Dave Grohl Confirms Foo Fighters Hiatus

David Grohl of Foo Fighters

Dave Grohl says his band Foo Fighters is officially taking a break.

Grohl posted an open letter to the group’s Facebook account Tuesday, calling the band “my life,” but noting “it’s a good thing for all of us to go away for a while.”

Grohl told fans Saturday at the Global Citizen Festival he didn’t know when the band would play together again, and affirmed that in the letter.

“Without making a big deal out of it, we don’t have any shows after this. This is it, man,” Grohl said at the concert in NYC’s Central Park. “Honestly, I don’t know when we’re gonna do it again… and this is the perfect place to do it.”

He went more in-depth in the letter, writing, “Never in my wildest dreams did I think Foo Fighters would make it this far… There were times when I wanted to give up. But I can’t give up this band. And I never will. Because it’s not just a band to me. It’s my life. It’s my family. It’s my world.”

Grohl says he’s “not sure” when the Foo Fighters will play again, and is now focused on his forthcoming Sound City documentary and album. “A year in the making, it could be the biggest, most important project I’ve ever worked on,” he said of the project. “Get ready… It’s coming.”

He created Foo Fighters in 1994 after his time as the drummer in Nirvana, recording the band’s self-titled debut before inviting other members to join. The band has been one of rock ‘n’ roll’s most enduring critical and commercial successes, winning 11 Grammys, including five earlier this year.

© 2012 The Associated Press.

The Rolling Stones Unearth Vintage Clips for ‘Crossfire Hurricane’ Trailer

Retrospective documentary covers the rockers’ entire career

The Rolling Stones – Crossfire Hurricane (Trailer)

Published on Sep 25, 2012 by The Rolling Stones

The Rolling Stones, the rock ‘n’ roll icons who have defined creativity, daring and durability, are to be chronicled in a kaleidoscopic new film that documents the key periods of their career and their incredible adventures.

The film will be broadcast live by satellite to over 250 cinemas across Europe, from the London Film Festival Premiere on Thursday 18 October and include live coverage from the red carpet before the film screening begins. For more information and to book tickets, go here: http://www.rollingstones.com/crossfire-hurricane/

‘Crossfire Hurricane’, directed by Brett Morgen, provides a remarkable new perspective on the Stones’ unparalleled journey from blues-obsessed teenagers in the early 60’s to rock royalty. It’s all here in panoramic candour, from the Marquee Club to Hyde Park, from Altamont to ‘Exile, from club gigs to stadium extravaganzas.

With never-before-seen footage and fresh insights from the band themselves, the film will delight, shock and amaze longtime devotees, as well as another generation of fans, with its uniquely immersive style and tone. ‘Crossfire Hurricane’ places the viewer right on the frontline of the band’s most legendary escapades.

Taking its title from a lyric in ‘Jumping Jack Flash’, ‘Crossfire Hurricane’ gives the audience an intimate insight, for the first time, into exactly what it’s like to be part of the Rolling Stones, as they overcame denunciation, drugs, dissensions and death to become the definitive survivors. It’s the backstage pass to outdo them all.

The odyssey includes film from the Stones’ initial road trips and first controversies as they became the anti-Beatles, the group despised by authority because they connected and communicated with their own generation as no one ever had. “When we got together,” says Wyman, “something magical happened, and no one could ever copy that.”

From the outset of the film, viewers know they’re in for a white-knuckle ride. No sooner had the early Stones line-up first played live under that name in the summer of 1962 than they were bigger than the venues that tried to hold them. Wyman remembers how the crowds were soon inspiring manic behaviour, especially among screaming girls, whose uncontrollable excitement was obvious as stardom beckoned for the band already earmarked as the bad guys with press headlines — ‘Would you let your daughter marry a Rolling Stone?

Riots and the chaos of early tours are graphically depicted, as is the birth of the Jagger-Richards songwriting partnership. The many dramas they encountered are also fully addressed, including the Redlands drug bust, the descent of Brian Jones into what Richards calls “bye-bye land,” and the terror and disillusionment of 1969’s Altamont Festival.

The film illustrates the Stones’ evolution from being, as Mick vividly describes it, “the band everybody hated to the band everybody loves”: through the hedonistic 1970s and Keith’s turning-point bust in Canada to the spectacular touring phenomenon we know today. Richards also reveals the song that he believes defines the “essence” of his writing relationship with Jagger more than any other.

Asked in a formative interview in the film what it is that sets them apart from other groups, Jagger says with quiet understatement: “A chemical reaction seems to have happened.” Keith Richards added, “You can’t really stop the Rolling Stones, you know when that sort of avalanche is facing you, you just get out of the way”. It’s been happening ever since, and the life and times of the Rolling Stones have never been as electrifyingly portrayed as they are in ‘Crossfire Hurricane.’

Worldwide distributors of ‘Crossfire Hurricane’ are Eagle Rock Entertainment in London, with Tremelo Productions and Milkwood Films as the production companies.

As befits the first rock band to reach the 50-year milestone with their global stature now greater than ever, the film combines extensive historical footage, much of it widely unseen, with contemporary commentaries by Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, Ronnie Wood and former Stones Bill Wyman and Mick Taylor. Period interviews, extensive live performance material and news archive give the production a truly kinetic aura and no-holds-barred approach. ‘Crossfire Hurricane’ has taken over a year to make and produce with the full cooperation of The Rolling Stones and will be released in November.

A Guitar Maker Aims to Stay Plugged In

Workers build Fender guitars in a factory in Corona, Calif., east of Los Angeles.

Fender is the world’s largest maker of guitars. But the company, based in Scottsdale, Ariz., is struggling to keep up in a tight economy. A piece of flame maple is prepared — one of the first steps to building a guitar.

IN 1948, a radio repairman named Leo Fender took a piece of ash, bolted on a length of maple and attached an electronic transducer.

You know the rest, even if you don’t know you know the rest.

You’ve heard it — in the guitar riffs of Buddy Holly, Jimi Hendrix, George Harrison, Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, Pete Townshend, Bruce Springsteen, Mark Knopfler, Kurt Cobain and on and on.

It’s the sound of a Fender electric guitar. Mr. Fender’s company, now known as the Fender Musical Instruments Corporation, is the world’s largest maker of guitars. Its Stratocaster, which made its debut in 1954, is still a top seller. For many, the Strat’s cutting tone and sexy, double-cutaway curves mean rock ’n’ roll.

But this heart of rock isn’t beating quite the way it once did. Like many other American manufacturers, Fender is struggling to hold on to what it’s got in a tight economy. Sales and profits are down this year. A Strat, after all, is what economists call a consumer discretionary item — a nonessential.

More than macroeconomics, however, is at work here. Fender, based in Scottsdale, Ariz., is also being buffeted by powerful forces on Wall Street.

Read entire article by The New York Times

Keeping the Music Alive – Slide Show

Credit: Monica Almeida/The New York Times