Not Fade Away: A Love Letter To Rock ‘N’ Roll

NOT FADE AWAY

** ENTER **

Film review by Peter Travers

You expect a hot dose of bada-bing, what with David Chase, creator of HBO’s groundbreaking crime drama The Sopranos, making his feature debut as a writer-director. Instead, Chase offers a gritty, graceful salute to rock & roll. Like Douglas (John Magaro), his film’s protagonist, Chase grew up in suburban New Jersey in the 1960s playing covers of Buddy Holly and the Stones in his garage. Unlike Douglas, Chase never went farther than his garage. But the impact of the music, the way it opened doors to a larger world that embraced TV, film, politics and renegade social change, never left Chase. His love for the period permeates every frame.

Douglas and his bandmates Eugene (Jack Huston of Boardwalk Empire) and Wells (Will Brill) vie for the attentions of Grace (a luminous Bella Heathcote), and they comically and touchingly prepare for a fame that never comes. Home from college, Douglas debates his old-school father (a splendid James Gandolfini), who hates his Dylanesque hair and Cuban heels. Later, at a restaurant, when Dad confesses to an affair and a possibly terminal illness, father and son make a connection that is more heart-piercing for being so tentative. Chase shows a natural affinity for actors, who are uniformly excellent. The awkwardness comes in letting some of the stories breathe at the expense of others, suggesting something lost in the cutting. The music, expertly curated by Steven Van Zandt, is in the film’s DNA. Watching Antonioni’s Blow-Up at a theater with Grace, Douglas complains about the lack of scoring in a silent park scene. “The trees are the music,” Grace tells him. She knows the secrets that lie in the spaces between words and music. So does Chase. His ardent, acutely observed debut makes him, at 67, a filmmaker to watch.

** ENTER **

First trailer of Not Fade Away released

Check out the full press release below:

David Chase’s NOT FADE AWAY announced by
THE FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
as the Centerpiece Gala Selection for the 2012 NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL

NEW YORK, August 15, 2012 —The Film Society of Lincoln Center announced today that David Chase’s NOT FADE AWAY will make its World Premiere on Saturday, October 6 as the Centerpiece Gala selection for the 50th New York Film Festival (September 28-October 14).

Making his feature directing debut, David Chase’s (The Sopranos) coming-of-age movie is set in New Jersey in 1964 where a group of friends are inspired to form their own rock band fronted by a gifted singer-songwriter (terrific newcomer John Magaro). The film masterfully captures the era’s conflicting attitudes and ideologies, all set to a dynamic soundtrack produced by the legendary Steven Van Zandt. The film also stars Jack Huston, Will Brill, Bella Heathcote, James Gandolfini, Brad Garrett and Christopher McDonald. To be released by Paramount Vantage, the film’s roll-out will begin on December 21, 2012.

Rose Kuo, Executive Director, The Film Society of Lincoln Center, said, “It’s a privilege to welcome David Chase to the New York Film Festival with his feature film debut. NOT FADE AWAY’s fun, music-infused world created by Chase offers an endearing and complex portrait of a young man’s coming-of-age in the 60s and features terrific work by an ensemble cast of exciting new talent.”

Chase said, “NOT FADE AWAY is a personal film with a backdrop very important to me, a period in American music that was one of the best. To have the film debut at the NYFF exceeds my wildest dreams and the dreams of everyone associated with the movie. So many of my favorite films have been revealed to the public at the NYFF. I’m honored and thrilled.”

The 17-day New York Film Festival highlights the best in world cinema, featuring top films from celebrated filmmakers as well as fresh new talent. The selection committee, chaired by Peña also includes: Melissa Anderson, Contributor, Village Voice; Scott Foundas, Associate Program Director, The Film Society of Lincoln Center; Todd McCarthy, Chief Film Critic, The Hollywood Reporter; and Amy Taubin, Contributing Editor, Film Comment and Sight and Sound.

The New York Film Festival is generously sponsored by Royal Bank of Canada, American Airlines, The New York Times, Stella Artois, HBO, WABC, Trump International Hotel and Tower, the National Endowment for the Arts and New York State Council on the Arts.

Readers Vote The Killers’ Miss Atomic Bomb The Best Song of 2012

Happy_New_Year_2013

The Killers are genuine rock & roll survivors. The group took a long break after they wrapped a tour behind 2008’s Day and Age. During that time frontman Brandon Flowers focused on other projects and mourned the loss of his mother. Some fans feared the break was going to become permanent, but last year they started doing overseas shows and begin work on their long-awaited fourth album. They pulled out all the stops for the disc, working with many of the biggest producers in rock, including Brendan O’Brien, Daniel Lanois, Steve Lillywhite and Stuart Price, who worked on “Miss Atomic Bomb.” The track was inspired by a famous photograph of a Nevada woman who was named “Miss Atomic Bomb” in a pageant held after a nuclear bomb was tested.

Grizzly Bear’s Ed Droste Upset About Grammys, Justin Vernon Reminds Him Grammys Are Bullshit

Watch the Brooklyn band Grizzly Bear performing @ Letterman Show – Dec 13, 2012

Vernon: “the grammies aren’t a measure of much that is calculable or quantifiable by our own contexts for music. why you create is most important.”

The nominations for the 2013 Grammy Awards were named. Frank Ocean, Fiona Apple, Jack White, M83, the Black Keys, and many more are up for awards. But not Grizzly Bear, which appears to have upset the band’s Ed Droste, who expressed his feelings in a string of Tweets last night. His thoughts provoked Justin Vernon of Bon Iver, who took home several awards last year, to reply with words of encouragement for Droste and disdain for the Grammys. It seems winning those Grammys has not changed Vernon’s feelings towards them.

Here’s how the conversation went down. First, Droste described his sad (“:(“) feelings:

2k12 has been a mixed vibe.
We won’t win the Grahmees! 😦
So the Grammies are literally based off sales and nothing else?#bummerzone
Super relieved Taylor Swift is up for another award. Was worried she didn’t have enough! #phew

He then @-replied Vernon:

@blobtower bb, want to know the Grammy secret! ❤
Don't know how you managed to infiltrate @blobtower, what's the secret?
or maybe we gotta make better music :/ point is a year ago I was so excited you were nominated, and nobody from "our world" 😦

Vernon then explained why he hates the Grammys:

this is why i hate the grammies. because it allows you to question what you've done. don't question what you’ve done Ed.
y'alls music is pure as fuck and there is nobody making music like you and i think it's truly unique. the grammies aren’t a measure of much that is calculable or quantifiable by our own contexts for music. why you create is most important.
All this being said, FUCK those morons for not knowing enough about GB [Grizzly Bear] #jordongotcutfromhighschoolbasketball

Finally, Droste said, "thanks boo! Not really questioning what we've done, definitely questioning other things tho."

Here’s To Axl Rose and the Bunch of Random Dudes Calling Themselves Guns N’ Roses Getting the Hell Out of Town

Guns N Roses at Purple Magazine Party

Guns N Roses playing Paradise City live at the Rose Bar for the Purple Fashion magazine after party, New York. Video Olivier Zahm

So Sebastian Bach saved Axl Rose from being attacked by a maniac with a blade two years ago at the Gramercy Hotel’s Rose Bar in NYC. “Nobody is getting anywhere near my man Axl Rose with a knife,” said the one-time Skid Row frontman, and from his position atop a banquet, he summoned security to cast what may in fact have been a very sensible individual out into the cold. It was Valentine’s Day at the Purple mag afterparty, and the band of misfits who call themselves Guns N’ Roses were blasting the assembled celebrities with a two hour set not unlike the one the band had visited on an unsuspecting crowd inside a John Varvatos store last week. Fashion Week ends tomorrow and with any luck, it will take Axl Rose with it.

Because even as various comparatively youthful fashion mafia members like the Opening Ceremony kids and Erin Wasson are sensible enough to fill their events with guests like the Dirty Projectors and Yeasayer–bands that whatever you might think of them, are at least having a real moment of their own–the venal and dark heart of Fashion Week’s grown-up contingent is laid bare by the industry’s compulsion to fete a washed up, fake band, over and over and over again. And make no mistake: if Chinese Democracy and the stooge-filled line-up (sorry Tommy Stinson) who parade around pretending to be Guns N’ Roses didn’t convince you that it’s past time for Axl Rose to abandon this charade, allow the videos to change your mind. They are awful. Even in a world of fucked up YouTube audio and blurry cameraphone footage, we can calibrate. We can make these distinctions. And anyone who is being honest with themselves knows that this band’s two stops in the city have been long and abysmal.

But of course this is a spectacle that belongs to Fashion Week, an event that can’t help but gravitate toward the most ostentatious, cynical, and exclusive displays of so-called glamour and nightlife. Which is fine: nobody is asking Oliver Zahm to hang out at Death By Audio. But enough with the excitable sightings of a band who basically exists at this point to make the hordes of models and magazine editors surrounding it feel special, like they’re living some sort of magical moment. They are not.

They are chasing the myth over the reality, the thing they held dear in their youth over whatever might be vital and real today. This isn’t a sin–fashion is all about this stuff, as we heard over and over again the wake of Alexander McQueen’s suicide. But there is genuine escapism and then there is an overweight and physically taxed band calling themselves Guns N’ Roses playing bad versions of decades-old songs, to audiences so exclusive that Axl Rose couldn’t have gotten anywhere near the door, circa 1986. Where is the magic in that?

Is Your Band Having Issues? Ask Lola Palizza For Advice

UFO

Are you a musician? Is your group having issues?
Relax, you are not alone. Most bands have issues sooner than later. Critic Lola Palizza can help you. She has played in and managed bands, toured internationally, booked shows, produced records, worked as a publicist, and she is here to help you stop doing it wrong. Send your problems to her — confidentiality is assured, unless you want to use your drama as a ticket to Internet microfame.

Hi Lola,
Should My Band Hire a Publicist? I’m in a psychedelic punk band (think Flaming Lips/Minutemen/Cake combo) and wrapping up work on a new self-released EP. I have this feeling nobody is going to hear it outside of our small circle of friends. Our main goal is to have the EP reviewed in music magazines/websites/blogs in hopes that would spread our music to at least a few other people and maybe get some attention from small festival promoters. We’re on a pretty tight budget but I’ve thought about contacting publicists who work for more prominent bands we dig, but I’m sure they wouldn’t be interested in working with a mostly unknown band with such weird music. I figure we’re going to need a publicist with connections to the right music reviewers to make this happen, but I don’t know how to find a good one. Help!
Thanks a bunch,
Echos Myron

Dear E.M.,
It’s good you’re facing your fear now because your hunch is correct: your record is probably going to languish amongst your friends and existing fans. Even if you are totally awesome, which maybe you are, that is just kind of how it goes. You are a small local band still.

Also, your music is not that weird. Some of your reference points are bands that have had hits now and again. “Weird” is Keiji Haino doing a side of thumb piano and washing machine. Purge this idea that you are too out there to be fully understood; it’s tripping you up needlessly. It’ll make you bitter over time. You’ll end up sounding like Jim O’Rourke in that interview he did with The Wire about how he was expatriating because no one in Chicago knew about super obscure British folk music; how no one gets you is kind of a sad trope.

The other thing that’s tripping you up? This idea that if you do x, then you will automatically get a particular, fixed result. That’s one of the myths of being in a band. And also of just being alive in general. You could hire a really fancy publicist that knows all the right people and get you some really good reviews in secondary market weeklies and a two line review in Men’s Health and a Brooklyn Vegan post. And then you are out $6000, give or take a grand, and nothing has changed or gotten easier. The main difference is now you have a press kit.

Another problem is that it’s an EP. A lot of people don’t often care about or write about EPs; I myself am one of those people. For a recent example of a famous musician issuing an EP and people barely giving a shit, see Lana Del Rey. How many EPs are in your iPod at this very moment? Be honest. How many times this years did someone say to you “Oh my god, I loved their EP!” and they weren’t talking about Angel Haze? I understand that sometimes doing an EP instead of an album is a matter of money, but its 2012, you can find a way to do it for free or very cheap. I think the nature of how we consume music means you need to either make it a single or make it an LP. An EP can read as a lack of commitment or that you are a band with only three good songs. Exception to that rule being that it’s all covers, or it’s a tribute or themed around a holiday like Arbor Day or Lincoln’s Birthday there is only so much inspiration one can mine.

If you are wondering when I am going to answer your question about how to hire a publicist, I’m not, because you shouldn’t. I say that as someone who did PR for bands like yours for a decade. Focus on getting local press through making personal contact with those folks, or maybe rope in an ambitious young person in your scene who is interested in getting into “the music industry” and see if they want to help you out with promoting your release. It is a fantasy that the right publicist can just “make it happen.”

Your time is going to be best spent promoting your release in town and regionally. Being written up in the Eau Claire Daily Pinecone is certainly not as exciting as being Best New Music’d out of obscurity by Pitchfork–but build locally and work up. Sure, email a little pitch and Soundcloud link to every music blog and website that matters to you and cross your fingers, but do not spend money on a publicist until you have something good going locally. By that I mean consistently drawing 150-200 people every time you play, supporting national bands at bigger venues in your city, have buzz and tangible audience in nearby cities.

Once you have all that and have an album to promote and are planning on touring to support it, then we can talk about hiring a publicist.
Peace,
Lola Palizza

Upcoming Concerts NYC – Dec 29 -31-2012

DEC 29

Phish
Madison Square Garden
Seventh Ave. & 32nd St. New York, NY 10001
212-465-6741
http://www.thegarden.com
$59.50

Jane’s Addiction
Terminal 5
610 W. 56th St. New York, NY 10019
212-260-4700
http://www.terminal5nyc.com
$43

The Disco Biscuits
Best Buy Theater
1515 Broadway
New York, NY 10036
$56

My Morning Jacket + Deer Tick
The Capitol Theatre
149 Westchester Ave.
Port Chester, NY 10573
$56

Beatles Brunch
12:00 p.m. every Sat.
B.B. King Blues Club & Grill
237 W. 42nd St.
New York, NY 10036

DEC 30

Phish
Madison Square Garden
Seventh Ave. & 32nd St. New York, NY 10001
212-465-6741
http://www.thegarden.com
$49.50-$179.50

Coldplay
Barclays Center
620 Atlantic Ave. Brooklyn, NY 11217
http://www.barclayscenter.com
$49.50-$179.50

Naturally 7
Barclays Center
620 Atlantic Ave. Brooklyn, NY 11217
http://www.barclayscenter.com
$58-$84

Pretty Lights
Roseland Ballroom
239 W. 52nd St. New York, NY 10019
212-247-0200
http://www.roselandballroom.com
$50-$70

Gov’t Mule + Sister Sparrow & the Dirty Birds
Beacon Theater
8:00 p.m. December 30
8:00 p.m. December 31
@ Beacon Theatre
2124 Broadway
New York, NY 10023
$50-$70

DEC 31

Phish
Madison Square Garden
Seventh Ave. & 32nd St. New York, NY 10001
212-465-6741
http://www.thegarden.com
$49.50-$499.50

Coldplay
Barclays Center
620 Atlantic Ave. Brooklyn, NY 11217
http://www.barclayscenter.com
$49.50-$499.50

Jay-Z
Barclays Center
620 Atlantic Ave. Brooklyn, NY 11217
http://www.barclayscenter.com
$58-$84

Pretty Lights
Roseland Ballroom
239 W. 52nd St. New York, NY 10019
212-247-0200
http://www.roselandballroom.com
$58-$84

Julian Jordan
Pacha
618 W. 46th St. New York, NY 10036
212-209-7500
http://www.pachanyc.com
$50

Sander Van Doorn
Pacha
618 W. 46th St. New York, NY 10036
212-209-7500
http://www.pachanyc.com
$50

Amanda Palmer and the Grand Theft Orchestra
Terminal 5
610 W. 56th St.
New York, NY 10019
$50-$60