Haim interested in politics? The girls dedicated song to Prime Minister David Cameron as they meet on politics TV show.

The girls with the guru

The girls with the guru

Haim dedicate song to Prime Minister David Cameron as they meet on politics TV show

The love-in was mutual as the Prime Minister tweeted about the Californian band afterwards

Prime Minister David Cameron has tweeted about Haim after meeting the band during a BBC TV appearance (September 29).

Haim’s bass player Este cheekily dedicated their performance of ‘The Wire’ to David Cameron as they played on the show. At the end of the song, she pointed at the Prime Minister saying, “That was for you DC, it’s all about you.”

They were all guests on BBC1’s Sunday morning politics programme, The Andrew Marr Show.

Following their appearance, David Cameron tweeted: “Great to meet @HAIMtheband on Marr – looking forward to listening to the album they gave me.”

Haim also tweeted saying: “About to be on ?#marrshow? on bbc1! Este’s about to talk to the Prime Minister… Oh no.”

The program, which has seen musical guests like Snow Patrol and PJ Harvey in the past, often concludes with a band playing new material.

Critics are working their tongue so far up the band’s backside that it is licking their teeth clean, but the honeymoon period soon will come to an end.  The album Days are Gone has 11 tracks of which only 4 are new songs co-written with other artists; the rest are reheated tunes.  Chuck D  yelled out, “Don’t believe the hype!” but the fact remains that music and the language of hyperbole go hand in hand.  This can be seen in the onslaught of orgasmic gushing from people who should know better.

So far nothing justify the immense media attention and endless coverage. There is a gap between the unusual media attention and actual fanbase. You’d think they are par with Kanye West or Lady Gaga, considering the endless coverage and articles about them on the UK. The fact remains that their last single reached #27 in Australia only. They are only truly “popular” in the UK – and Australia. Maybe their record will top the charts. They’ve released 4 singles so far, 2 charted #32 and #30 in the UK. That is with endless BBC, NME and Guardian coverage.

The group are eager to please their parents and to make the right marks. Yet they lack that special spark. They are proficient, they “can play” and entertain crowds with chit-chat and jamming, and yet we don’t get much heart from them.  There’re are bands like The Strypes whose members are 16-18 years old and they are incredibly professional and totally dedicated to music.  The Haim sisters are much older with Este Haim getting closer to 30 – she’s 27 now, and behaving like kids who decided to form a band for the sole purpose of having fun.  We don’t get much from the singer either.  We find her style to be imitative and lacking in identity. At this point we all know they are  “Californians,”  “hilarious”,  and “lacking good songs,” and that they started a band with their parents who “encouraged” them to perform in their living room.   Next thing you know, the BBC tipped them as Best Sound of 2013.  Didn’t we all know next will be to make that mediocre debut album the #1 in the UK charts?  Are you kidding me, dudes?

Haim performing Forever REDUB? – Later… with Jools Holland?

Haim performing The Wire for PM David Cameron

The record industry, supported by the so-called mainstream “critics” want pop stars, the reason the mediocre and much hyped new album of Haim has received positive reviews. Pop stars market to the system as a cover for mediocrity. While rockers  boldly presents his or her music to the masses with a take-it-or-leave-it mentality,  Pop stars don’t dare produce anything but people-pleasing material, often at the expense of quality. They give the people what they want, but it’s fast-food fare – instant gratification with no lasting value. The bigger problem, though, is not that the pop star’s work is mediocre, but that mediocre is the best they can do. It’s impossible to hold a pop star to a higher standard when the ability just isn’t there.

Clearly there are a wide array of both rock stars and pop stars in the working world, and it’s not hard to see which would be the most beneficial addition to your team. Recruiting can often be an experience as dynamic as the music scene itself, but being able to separate the rockers from the pop stars can help to ensure a smoother process.

And for those about to hire, we salute you!

kFB9sFn

XUhmV3Y

Q&A: Pearl Jam Producer Brendan O’Brien on the Making of ‘Lightning Bolt’

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‘Eddie Vedder still pulls out the same typewriter he’s been using for 20 years’

Pearl Jam have worked with a handful of producers over their two-decade career, but they keep coming back to Brendan O’Brien. He first worked with the band on Vs. in 1993, and since then he’s produced everything from Vitalogy to Yield to their 2009 LP Backspacer. O’Brien teamed up with Pearl Jam again for their upcoming 10th disc, Lightning Bolt, in stores on October 14th.

We spoke with O’Brien about the new album, his long history with Pearl Jam, his ill-fated attempt to cut a record with Aerosmith and the summer he spent on the road as Neil Young’s keyboardist.  

I was just watching the footage of you playing with Pearl Jam at Wrigley Field. That must have been a lot of fun.
That was a blast. 

What was the scene like backstage during the rain delay?
It was a little tense here and there, because the band really wanted it to work out. This was a real big moment for those guys – for Eddie, for all of them. They were really concerned it was gonna get blown out. I don’t believe there was a “rain day” anywhere. There wasn’t a chance to make it up.

They were determined to make it work. Their road manager, Smitty, just worked those people at the neighborhood coalition to let them extend the curfew until two a.m. When it became clear that was going to happen, spirits definitely picked up.

I remember standing off to the side of the stage when they came back on. I was expecting to see a smattering of empty seats. Nobody went home. Everybody was there, ready to go.

Tell me how this new Pearl Jam album started. What were the first steps?
The seeds of this album actually started when we were doing the last record, Backspacer. Everybody was really happy with how that worked out. We had a really good time doing it. The idea was to do another record in the same way, where we get together in Seattle, work the songs up and cut them down in Los Angeles at Henson, the studio where I usually work.

We started working about a year and a half ago, maybe even longer. We did about six or seven songs that were ready. My idea was, “Let’s do these songs, make them great and be all excited about them, and then that will propel the band into writing the rest of the songs. We’ll get right back and do the rest of them.” Well, that didn’t happen. I was not able to get them into the studio for another year and a half. 

Why?
[Laughs] They had a lot of things going on. I just don’t think they were quite ready just yet to do the whole . . . Once they finish a record, I think they know they’ve gotta crank the whole thing up. If they’re happy with the record, it sort of means they’re going to get the whole thing rolling. I just don’t think they were quite ready to do all of that. They all had various solo things going on.That’s the best I can figure. You’ll have to ask them. Whatever happened, we got together about five months ago and started back up. We had a group of songs, and we picked from those. The good news is that we had sort of a template of songs that we started in the first session, and we knew we had to do something at least that good, or better. If they weren’t rising to that kind of level, we would just move on from there. Do you think they benefited from all that time off because they came back with fresh heads?
Um . . . I don’t know if it would’ve been any different if we’d started right back up, but I do know that for whatever reason, the songs weren’t there previously. And we kind of had to wait for the songs to come. I don’t know if that’s any better or worse. Certainly not worse, but I don’t know if it was any better for the time off. But it certainly worked out great. I can’t complain about it. 

Do they get together as a group and write prior to meeting back up? Do they record stuff separately and then present them to the group when they reconvene with you? How does the process work?
At this point, most of the guys kind of work on their own thing separately and then bring them in, and they finish them as a group. That’s how most of the stuff has worked out on the last few records I’ve worked on. I think it works out best for them when they do that. Everyone has their own sort of recording gear and their own little studios. I mean, Stone [Gossard] has a full-blown, actual studio. They all have their own recording rigs at home, so they’re able to do their own demos.

In the early days of Vs. and Vitalogy there was a certain amount of everybody getting in a room and kind of jamming out. Now, it’s pretty much everyone puts together songs, and they finish them together as a band. 

It’s a relatively unique situation, where you have a band with five songwriters.
Yeah, right. Everyone has something to offer. It’s unique, and it has its own special challenges. You’d like everyone to be heard, but I think everyone has sort of grown up at this point. We’re going to put 11 or 12 songs on the record. Someone may or may not be as represented as they were on other records. This is how it works out.

For some records, someone gets a lot of songs, and the next one . . . It’s just how the songs work out as a team. Again, it can be a challenge from a producer’s perspective, because you’re trying to keep everybody involved. This is very much a band, as much as any band I’ve ever worked with. They do have a leader – Eddie is their leader. But they all kind of lead different spots in different ways, and they do all have their moments. They’re all very capable guys, songwriting-wise. 

How does the sound of this record compare to the previous one?
I’m terrible at stuff like that. The way I’ve always kind of recorded records and made records is that we shut up and the songs dictate how it’s going to sound. We don’t really think about it that much. There’s not a lot of pretense about it. So I don’t know that they sound that much . . . we kind of recorded in the same fashion.

But I guess there are a few longer, more devoted songs. On Backspacer I really love that all the songs were fairly short. I love that about it. They were all “get in, get out fast.” This record has a few songs that have a bit more of a . . . they kind of . . . what’s the word I’m looking for here? They’re longer. [Laughs] I don’t know if the word “depth” is right, but some of the songs kind of take you down a road for a while.

There’s a song called “Sirens” that I think is one of the best songs on the record. That clocks in around five minutes, which is long pop song. It really works out. A song called “Infallible” – at least that’s what I believe it’s called – is also a little more developed that way.

I’ll leave it to the guys in the band to describe what the songs are about and that kind of stuff. But as far as sonically, the way it sounds different, I don’t know. You’ll have to tell me.

Why?
[Laughs] They had a lot of things going on. I just don’t think they were quite ready just yet to do the whole . . . Once they finish a record, I think they know they’ve gotta crank the whole thing up. If they’re happy with the record, it sort of means they’re going to get the whole thing rolling. I just don’t think they were quite ready to do all of that. They all had various solo things going on.

That’s the best I can figure. You’ll have to ask them. Whatever happened, we got together about five months ago and started back up. We had a group of songs, and we picked from those. The good news is that we had sort of a template of songs that we started in the first session, and we knew we had to do something at least that good, or better. If they weren’t rising to that kind of level, we would just move on from there. 

Do you think they benefited from all that time off because they came back with fresh heads?
Um . . . I don’t know if it would’ve been any different if we’d started right back up, but I do know that for whatever reason, the songs weren’t there previously. And we kind of had to wait for the songs to come. I don’t know if that’s any better or worse. Certainly not worse, but I don’t know if it was any better for the time off. But it certainly worked out great. I can’t complain about it. 

Do they get together as a group and write prior to meeting back up? Do they record stuff separately and then present them to the group when they reconvene with you? How does the process work?
At this point, most of the guys kind of work on their own thing separately and then bring them in, and they finish them as a group. That’s how most of the stuff has worked out on the last few records I’ve worked on. I think it works out best for them when they do that. Everyone has their own sort of recording gear and their own little studios. I mean, Stone [Gossard] has a full-blown, actual studio. They all have their own recording rigs at home, so they’re able to do their own demos.

In the early days of Vs. and Vitalogy there was a certain amount of everybody getting in a room and kind of jamming out. Now, it’s pretty much everyone puts together songs, and they finish them together as a band. 

It’s a relatively unique situation, where you have a band with five songwriters.
Yeah, right. Everyone has something to offer. It’s unique, and it has its own special challenges. You’d like everyone to be heard, but I think everyone has sort of grown up at this point. We’re going to put 11 or 12 songs on the record. Someone may or may not be as represented as they were on other records. This is how it works out.

For some records, someone gets a lot of songs, and the next one . . . It’s just how the songs work out as a team. Again, it can be a challenge from a producer’s perspective, because you’re trying to keep everybody involved. This is very much a band, as much as any band I’ve ever worked with. They do have a leader – Eddie is their leader. But they all kind of lead different spots in different ways, and they do all have their moments. They’re all very capable guys, songwriting-wise. 

How does the sound of this record compare to the previous one?
I’m terrible at stuff like that. The way I’ve always kind of recorded records and made records is that we shut up and the songs dictate how it’s going to sound. We don’t really think about it that much. There’s not a lot of pretense about it. So I don’t know that they sound that much . . . we kind of recorded in the same fashion.

But I guess there are a few longer, more devoted songs. On Backspacer I really love that all the songs were fairly short. I love that about it. They were all “get in, get out fast.” This record has a few songs that have a bit more of a . . . they kind of . . . what’s the word I’m looking for here? They’re longer. [Laughs] I don’t know if the word “depth” is right, but some of the songs kind of take you down a road for a while.

There’s a song called “Sirens” that I think is one of the best songs on the record. That clocks in around five minutes, which is long pop song. It really works out. A song called “Infallible” – at least that’s what I believe it’s called – is also a little more developed that way.

I’ll leave it to the guys in the band to describe what the songs are about and that kind of stuff. But as far as sonically, the way it sounds different, I don’t know. You’ll have to tell me.

How has your role as producer changed since the days of Vs. and Vitalogy?
It’s changed a bit. We all kind of hit at the same time. They had just blown up with popularity out of nowhere. So I think that my role at the time was really getting those guys in a room and getting them in a headspace to record and make records. In a lot of ways it was as lot more difficult, just because they were trying to feel their way around it.

We made a lot of good records in those days, but there was a different way of doing it. In those days, there was a lot of setting up. We actually went into Vitalogy without having any songs. We’d start at noon and say, “What have you got?” and we’d start working. We’d never do that now. That’s for young people. That’s for people who have not made many records yet.

Once you’ve made a few records, you realize that’s just toil and trouble. I think my role now has turned into more of a traditional producer. I kind of help them pick songs and help with all of the sessions. We’ve had a trust develop over the years where they trust me to do the right thing, for the most part. And if there’s anything that they’re just not digging what we’re doing, they know that I’ll listen and we’ll figure something else out. 

Walk me through a typical day of creating this album.
Well, there’s two different days. One is the tracking sessions, where they’re all in the room at the same time. We still do track the songs with everybody playing at the same time. We may not use everything we tracked at the same time, but I think it’s important for all of us, even with Eddie’s singing. I’ve got to hear everybody at the same time so I know if the parts are going to work or if the key is going to work, or the tempo. All that stuff.

If everybody is in the room at the same time, we’ll listen to the demo that whoever has made, and then we’ll start working on the arrangement that works best for the band. We pretty much worked out every song on this record one song at a time. We would work a song up, work the arrangement, get it sounding right, and then track the song. We’d do that before we moved onto the next one.  

How many weeks total did you track?
Mixing and everything, probably no more than six or seven weeks. Maybe a little more. 

But that’s across two years.
Right. Well, we did them in two sessions. The first session, over a year and a half ago, took three weeks.  Then we were probably in Los Angeles for a couple of weeks to record at this last session. I think we mixed everything in Seattle. They wanted to mix up there because they all wanted to be around. It takes a little longer when everybody is around. I say a “little longer,” but It probably took 10 days. That’s not a long time for some people, but that seems like a long time to me.  

Do you ever serve as a band mediator? I mean, what do you do when they don’t agree on something? Are you the designated neutral party?
Sometime’s the producer’s role is to try and be a little bit of – I don’t know if “conscience” is the right word, but just the voice of the band that says, “This is really working. Let’s give it a shot.” And I have said those things out loud: “Hey, let’s really give this a shot, and I promise if this is not working out, at some point we’ll stop and do something else.”

If I really think something deserves attention, I will say that. And they’ll usually do it. And there are times when it works out, and other time they’ll do it and they’ll come back to me and go, “Uh, hey, we’ve tried it and we’re not digging it. Let’s move on.”  

I’m sure everything is much easier now. When you started, these were young guys with a lot of pressure on their shoulders.
I like to think we’re all better at our jobs than we were in those days. I feel like I’m better at what I do. But I feel like we were pretty good at it then. They’ve all sort of come to terms with what they want and what they’re doing. They’ve really learned over the years. When we first met and started working, I knew Jeff [Ament] and Stone OK, but I didn’t know anyone else very well at all.

I barely knew Eddie, and Eddie was a tough guy to get next to in those days. And so I didn’t really try that hard, because he didn’t seem to want to. He wanted to be more of a working thing, and that was difficult sometimes. But that’s just how it was.

In those early days, how difficult or hard it might have been, it seemed to work out. But you’re right that it is easier now in several ways. Everything is a little smoother. 

Are they more democratic these days?
In some things they’ve always been very democratic, and in some things someone takes over and it’s their moment. That’s how it works. They’ve usually been pretty good at identifying what those moments are. If Eddie’s got a song that he feels really strongly about, then we’re probably going to do it. If one of the guys has a song that they feel really strongly about, I can promise you that we’re going to do everything we can to try and work that out.  

There’s also a lot less pressure on them these days. They have this massive fan base, but it’s not like 1993, where the media and the entire music industry was obsessing over their next move.
I think they probably feel that. I don’t. I take each record very personally. I feel like it’s my job to help them put the very best forward. It’s my job to help them put out a record where people say, “Oh, them. I love Pearl Jam! I’d forgotten how much I liked them. I like this stuff, too. It’s great!”

It’s easy for a band that’s been around for a long time to gear down a bit when it comes to songwriting and making records. It’s very easy to bring it down. But not these guys. They want it badly. I think that’s awesome. I’m very happy with that.

How has your role as producer changed since the days of Vs. and Vitalogy?
It’s changed a bit. We all kind of hit at the same time. They had just blown up with popularity out of nowhere. So I think that my role at the time was really getting those guys in a room and getting them in a headspace to record and make records. In a lot of ways it was as lot more difficult, just because they were trying to feel their way around it.

We made a lot of good records in those days, but there was a different way of doing it. In those days, there was a lot of setting up. We actually went into Vitalogy without having any songs. We’d start at noon and say, “What have you got?” and we’d start working. We’d never do that now. That’s for young people. That’s for people who have not made many records yet.

Once you’ve made a few records, you realize that’s just toil and trouble. I think my role now has turned into more of a traditional producer. I kind of help them pick songs and help with all of the sessions. We’ve had a trust develop over the years where they trust me to do the right thing, for the most part. And if there’s anything that they’re just not digging what we’re doing, they know that I’ll listen and we’ll figure something else out. 

Walk me through a typical day of creating this album.
Well, there’s two different days. One is the tracking sessions, where they’re all in the room at the same time. We still do track the songs with everybody playing at the same time. We may not use everything we tracked at the same time, but I think it’s important for all of us, even with Eddie’s singing. I’ve got to hear everybody at the same time so I know if the parts are going to work or if the key is going to work, or the tempo. All that stuff.

If everybody is in the room at the same time, we’ll listen to the demo that whoever has made, and then we’ll start working on the arrangement that works best for the band. We pretty much worked out every song on this record one song at a time. We would work a song up, work the arrangement, get it sounding right, and then track the song. We’d do that before we moved onto the next one.  

How many weeks total did you track?
Mixing and everything, probably no more than six or seven weeks. Maybe a little more. 

But that’s across two years.
Right. Well, we did them in two sessions. The first session, over a year and a half ago, took three weeks.  Then we were probably in Los Angeles for a couple of weeks to record at this last session. I think we mixed everything in Seattle. They wanted to mix up there because they all wanted to be around. It takes a little longer when everybody is around. I say a “little longer,” but It probably took 10 days. That’s not a long time for some people, but that seems like a long time to me.  

Do you ever serve as a band mediator? I mean, what do you do when they don’t agree on something? Are you the designated neutral party?
Sometime’s the producer’s role is to try and be a little bit of – I don’t know if “conscience” is the right word, but just the voice of the band that says, “This is really working. Let’s give it a shot.” And I have said those things out loud: “Hey, let’s really give this a shot, and I promise if this is not working out, at some point we’ll stop and do something else.”

If I really think something deserves attention, I will say that. And they’ll usually do it. And there are times when it works out, and other time they’ll do it and they’ll come back to me and go, “Uh, hey, we’ve tried it and we’re not digging it. Let’s move on.”  

I’m sure everything is much easier now. When you started, these were young guys with a lot of pressure on their shoulders.
I like to think we’re all better at our jobs than we were in those days. I feel like I’m better at what I do. But I feel like we were pretty good at it then. They’ve all sort of come to terms with what they want and what they’re doing. They’ve really learned over the years. When we first met and started working, I knew Jeff [Ament] and Stone OK, but I didn’t know anyone else very well at all.

I barely knew Eddie, and Eddie was a tough guy to get next to in those days. And so I didn’t really try that hard, because he didn’t seem to want to. He wanted to be more of a working thing, and that was difficult sometimes. But that’s just how it was.

In those early days, how difficult or hard it might have been, it seemed to work out. But you’re right that it is easier now in several ways. Everything is a little smoother. 

Are they more democratic these days?
In some things they’ve always been very democratic, and in some things someone takes over and it’s their moment. That’s how it works. They’ve usually been pretty good at identifying what those moments are. If Eddie’s got a song that he feels really strongly about, then we’re probably going to do it. If one of the guys has a song that they feel really strongly about, I can promise you that we’re going to do everything we can to try and work that out.  

There’s also a lot less pressure on them these days. They have this massive fan base, but it’s not like 1993, where the media and the entire music industry was obsessing over their next move.
I think they probably feel that. I don’t. I take each record very personally. I feel like it’s my job to help them put the very best forward. It’s my job to help them put out a record where people say, “Oh, them. I love Pearl Jam! I’d forgotten how much I liked them. I like this stuff, too. It’s great!”

It’s easy for a band that’s been around for a long time to gear down a bit when it comes to songwriting and making records. It’s very easy to bring it down. But not these guys. They want it badly. I think that’s awesome. I’m very happy with that.

How has your role as producer changed since the days of Vs. and Vitalogy?
It’s changed a bit. We all kind of hit at the same time. They had just blown up with popularity out of nowhere. So I think that my role at the time was really getting those guys in a room and getting them in a headspace to record and make records. In a lot of ways it was as lot more difficult, just because they were trying to feel their way around it.

We made a lot of good records in those days, but there was a different way of doing it. In those days, there was a lot of setting up. We actually went into Vitalogy without having any songs. We’d start at noon and say, “What have you got?” and we’d start working. We’d never do that now. That’s for young people. That’s for people who have not made many records yet.

Once you’ve made a few records, you realize that’s just toil and trouble. I think my role now has turned into more of a traditional producer. I kind of help them pick songs and help with all of the sessions. We’ve had a trust develop over the years where they trust me to do the right thing, for the most part. And if there’s anything that they’re just not digging what we’re doing, they know that I’ll listen and we’ll figure something else out. 

Walk me through a typical day of creating this album.
Well, there’s two different days. One is the tracking sessions, where they’re all in the room at the same time. We still do track the songs with everybody playing at the same time. We may not use everything we tracked at the same time, but I think it’s important for all of us, even with Eddie’s singing. I’ve got to hear everybody at the same time so I know if the parts are going to work or if the key is going to work, or the tempo. All that stuff.

If everybody is in the room at the same time, we’ll listen to the demo that whoever has made, and then we’ll start working on the arrangement that works best for the band. We pretty much worked out every song on this record one song at a time. We would work a song up, work the arrangement, get it sounding right, and then track the song. We’d do that before we moved onto the next one.  

How many weeks total did you track?
Mixing and everything, probably no more than six or seven weeks. Maybe a little more. 

But that’s across two years.
Right. Well, we did them in two sessions. The first session, over a year and a half ago, took three weeks.  Then we were probably in Los Angeles for a couple of weeks to record at this last session. I think we mixed everything in Seattle. They wanted to mix up there because they all wanted to be around. It takes a little longer when everybody is around. I say a “little longer,” but It probably took 10 days. That’s not a long time for some people, but that seems like a long time to me.  

Do you ever serve as a band mediator? I mean, what do you do when they don’t agree on something? Are you the designated neutral party?
Sometime’s the producer’s role is to try and be a little bit of – I don’t know if “conscience” is the right word, but just the voice of the band that says, “This is really working. Let’s give it a shot.” And I have said those things out loud: “Hey, let’s really give this a shot, and I promise if this is not working out, at some point we’ll stop and do something else.”

If I really think something deserves attention, I will say that. And they’ll usually do it. And there are times when it works out, and other time they’ll do it and they’ll come back to me and go, “Uh, hey, we’ve tried it and we’re not digging it. Let’s move on.”  

I’m sure everything is much easier now. When you started, these were young guys with a lot of pressure on their shoulders.
I like to think we’re all better at our jobs than we were in those days. I feel like I’m better at what I do. But I feel like we were pretty good at it then. They’ve all sort of come to terms with what they want and what they’re doing. They’ve really learned over the years. When we first met and started working, I knew Jeff [Ament] and Stone OK, but I didn’t know anyone else very well at all.

I barely knew Eddie, and Eddie was a tough guy to get next to in those days. And so I didn’t really try that hard, because he didn’t seem to want to. He wanted to be more of a working thing, and that was difficult sometimes. But that’s just how it was.

In those early days, how difficult or hard it might have been, it seemed to work out. But you’re right that it is easier now in several ways. Everything is a little smoother. 

Are they more democratic these days?
In some things they’ve always been very democratic, and in some things someone takes over and it’s their moment. That’s how it works. They’ve usually been pretty good at identifying what those moments are. If Eddie’s got a song that he feels really strongly about, then we’re probably going to do it. If one of the guys has a song that they feel really strongly about, I can promise you that we’re going to do everything we can to try and work that out.  

There’s also a lot less pressure on them these days. They have this massive fan base, but it’s not like 1993, where the media and the entire music industry was obsessing over their next move.
I think they probably feel that. I don’t. I take each record very personally. I feel like it’s my job to help them put the very best forward. It’s my job to help them put out a record where people say, “Oh, them. I love Pearl Jam! I’d forgotten how much I liked them. I like this stuff, too. It’s great!”

It’s easy for a band that’s been around for a long time to gear down a bit when it comes to songwriting and making records. It’s very easy to bring it down. But not these guys. They want it badly. I think that’s awesome. I’m very happy with that.

I imagine it’s very healthy for all the guys to have solo projects. It means they can go work on their own and then come back and be really reinvigorated. Do you feel that way?
Um, yeah, sure. [Laughs]

So, no?
To be honest, I would have loved to have gotten back together sooner than a year and a half between sessions. I think it was very doable, but they’re going to do what they’re going to do. One of the reasons they’ve been a band so long and have been able to stay together is that they’ve figured out how to make it work. And it really is not up to me.

People ask me all the time, “Hey, why don’t you work with so and so? Why don’t you work him, him or her?” It’s like, they have to ask me first. It’s really not up to me. The schedule is not up to me. I’ve got to work around their schedules, for the most part.

So their solo things are very important to them. They put a lot of energy and effort into it. My thinking is that I’m very selfish when it comes to Pearl Jam. I’m like, “I want all your energy and your best songs for these records. That’s all I care about.” The other stuff, I’m thrilled that you’re doing it, but I’m very single-minded when it comes to that. 

But they keep bringing you back year after year. They could have basically any producer in the world, so that’s got to be flattering.
Well, yeah. That’s awesome. Trust me, I do not take that for granted. I work my hardest, and I have a great team, and I put my best people together with them. Again, I don’t take it for granted at all. 

There must be a comfort level with you that they could simply not have with any other producer.
I think so. But along with that, sometimes I’ve got to keep it all business. There are times away from the studio where we’ve become friends. They know my family and I know their families. My kids have grown up around them, and so we have that. That’s a separate, awesome part of our lives that I cherish.

But when we’re in the studio, sometimes I gotta keep it all business. I have to address them and have talks about songs in a way that’s not necessarily, “Hey, we’re all bros!” It’s like, “Hey, I’m your producer and you’re paying me to make tough decisions.” But that’s the gig.  

How is the Eddie Vedder of today different than the guy you first met 20 years ago?
To me, he’s remarkably the same. When it comes to writing songs and his intensity towards his work . . . He stills pulls out the same typewriter from the same little brown suitcase he’s been using for 20 years. It’s remarkable how much he approaches it the same. I know he’s a different guy since he’s a family man now, a father, but all that looks the same to me.   

I was talking to Joey Kramer from Aerosmith about three years ago and he was telling me about the record you started with them. He said it was a tragedy the thing never happened.
[Laughs] Yeah, yeah. 

I guess sometimes things just don’t work out.
[Laughs] Um, yeah. You could say that. Joey seems to be an awesome guy. How about that? Let me just say that I really enjoyed hanging out with Tom [Hamilton,] Brad [Whitford] and Joey. They were great. They were awesome. I just think you caught them at a particularly bad moment in time.
Maybe so, but that didn’t stop . . . Ah, well, never mind. I’m talking to a writer here. I gotta stop. Lastly, I was just watching video of the Pearl Jam/Neil Young 1995 European tour. You look like you were just having an absolute blast as part of that band.
It really was. From my perspective, I had just gone from someone trying to get anybody to pay attention to me. I was like, “Please hire me to do a job. I don’t care what it is. I want to make records.” Then in 1993, it just blew up. I worked nonstop. Late 1992 and 1993 was out of control, and I had a family. So I decided to take the whole summer off. Everybody was cool with that.

We’d done this record [Mirror Ball] with Neil Young. We did it very fast, but it was a lot of fun. I get a call from Pearl Jam’s manager and I hear, “Hey, Neil’s going on tour and he wants you to come play keyboards and sing, because Eddie’s not going. It’s the rest of the guys, and Eddie’s the only who could play all of the keyboards parts and sing the background.” I said, “Hey, I would love to, but I’m taking the summer off.”

So then I get a call from Neil’s manager.:”Hey man, Neil really wants you.” I said, “Listen, I would love to tour Europe with Neil, but I just can’t go. I told my family I was taking the summer off.”

The next call is from Neil. “Hey man, I’d really love for you to come. Bring you family along.” And I went, “OK. Sounds good.” [Laughs]

His point was, “You can play keyboards. You can do all this stuff.” I said to him, “I’m really a guitar player, Neil.” He goes, “I know, but you’re really good at keyboards, so you can do that. And I need somebody to sing all the backups.” So that was kind of my job. I took my wife and my two older daughters. My youngest was too small. We toured Europe together as a family, and it was a blast. 

It had to be surreal to be playing stuff like “Powderinger” and “Cortez the Killer” with Neil Young at these enormous concerts.

It really was. I’ m a little older than the band. I think I was 35 at the time. I remember thinking, “I really, really need to take this in. I need to put this in the memory bank.” I made a point to do my best to soak it all in. It was a great time. My older kids are in their early 20s now, but they all remember it. We’ve got pictures of them with Jeff and the band and Neil. It was just a blast.

I don’t think I made any money. I think I spent all of it on my family and traveling, but it was still absolutely great. 

It was a bummer that tour never came to the States. Lots of people forget it even happened.
There was talk of that happening, but for whatever reason it just didn’t. I was ready to go. At that point I was like, “This is a blast.” But it didn’t happen. We went over to the Middle East, we played in Jerusalem and other places. It was just unbelievable.

The countdown on Pearl Jam‘s website has finally hit zero and with it comes news that the band will release their 10th studio album, Lightning Bolt, on October 15th. The album cut “Mind Your Manners” is also available for your listening pleasure, and you can now pre-order Lightning Bolt as well.

Helmed by the band’s longtime producer Brendan O’Brien (who’s also worked with artists including Bruce Springsteen, Audioslave and the Gaslight Anthem), Lighting Bolt follows up the band’s last effort, 2009’s Backspacer.

Pearl Jam Talk ‘Lightning Bolt’ + “Sirens” Official Music Video

Lightning Bolt, A Short Film by Danny Clinch – Pearl Jam

Pearl Jam’s new record Lightning Bolt is set for release on October 15th, and now the band is offering a peek inside the record with a new short documentary directed by Danny Clinch. (He helmed the band’s 2007 concert film Imagine in Cornice, as well as the videos for Lightning Bolt tracks “Sirens” and “Mind Your Manners”).

“Sirens” is currently available for purchase on iTunes.

The short film takes a unique approach, with the band chatting about the new record with a handful of interviewees, including director Judd Apatow, Portlandia star and rocker Carrie Brownstein, champion surfer Mark Richards and former NFL safety Steve Gleason.

Intercut with tracks from Lightning Bolt, the band opens up about their new material and the continued growth of their songwriting process, with frontman Eddie Vedder drawing similarities between writing music and surfing. “The wave is actually the song and the words are kind of like the board, so it’s really how you’re moving around that,” he says. “Surfing is pretty easy once you’re on the wave, and so is songwriting, once you’re on the wave. But you can spend a lot of days out there paddling around and not getting anything.”

Pearl Jam have shared an official music video for “Sirens,” the second single off their upcoming 10th studio album, Lightning Bolt (out October 15th).

The stark clip, directed by filmmaker-photographer Danny Clinch, finds the band playing the mid-tempo power-ballad on a moody, dramatically lit stage. It’s a sharp contrast to the chaotic “Mind Your Manners” video (also directed by Clinch), which featured images of massive explosions and falling missiles. Clinch has a long history with the band, having also directed their 2007 concert film, Immagine in Cornice.

“Sirens” (Official Music Video) – Pearl Jam

Pearl Jam have worked with a handful of producers over their two-decade career, but they keep coming back to Brendan O’Brien. He first worked with the band on Vs. in 1993, and since then he’s produced everything from Vitalogy to Yield to their 2009 LP Backspacer. O’Brien teamed up with Pearl Jam again for their upcoming 10th disc, Lightning Bolt, in stores on October 14th.

Thom Yorke’s Atoms for Peace shakes up Brooklyn’s Barclays Center

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Atoms For Peace Concert @ Barclays Center 9/27

“I’m Justin Bieber,” quipped Thom Yorke, before gesturing to the man on his left, Flea. “And this is…Justin Bieber.” This was the extent of the band’s introductions at last night’s Atoms For Peace concert at Brooklyn’s cavernous Barclays Center. Yet also a good indication of what this project represents for Yorke: a chance to cut loose, and a welcome respite from the (at times) stifling severity his other band warrants. The lanky frontman soaked up every second, gleefully flailing his arms and greeting the crowd with a big, goofy “Wassssup?!” It helps that he’s palling around with a guy whose perhaps best known for this.

The near-capacity crowd at Barclays responded accordingly: arms aloft, sway-dancing, shrieking, and hollering. Given the degree of obsession Yorke and Radiohead inspire, it’s doubtful many were ignorant of their proper debut from earlier this year, Amok, but such a physical response was likely from the band’s nefarious live sound. Simply put, Yorke’s co-conspirators — the aforementioned Flea, famed Radiohead producer Nigel Godrich, esteemed session drummer Joey Waronker, and percussion virtuoso Mauro Refosco — rock, injecting irresistible rhythmic life into these songs. Flea, in particular, is a joy to watch, bounding from one side of the stage to the other with the alacrity of a toddler, and hearing him crush the outro to “Harrowdown Hill” was one of the show’s highlights. Hell, the Chili Peppers bassist even made the melodica look cool (as he did on “Skip Divided”).

Together, these five covered a significant amount of musical ground over the course of the night’s 90 odd minutes. In addition to just about everything from Amok and 2006′s The Eraser, Yorke also utilized the first encore (of two) to bust out some rarities, including Radiohead B-side “Paperbag Writer”, a jammy rendition of rare single “Feeling Pulled Apart by Horses”, and, most impressively, his 1998 collaboration with U.N.K.L.E., “Rabbit in Your Headlights” (if you’ve never seen its music video, fix that immediately). Performed live, the typical Atoms For Peace song starts relatively simple and gradually explodes with color, texture, and rhythm, and it was the same with the scintillating light-show, a frenzy of zig-zagging lines and pulsating fields that could go calm and serene during the more intimate moments.

Put together, it was an odd balancing act that didn’t look like one because it was so seamlessly executed. It also, in some ways, felt like a more authentic experience than a Radiohead concert might, at least in that a universally adored and critically lionized man ought to appear as if he’s having fun commanding a rapt crowd of thousands. (Even if his lyrics suggest he’s anything but deluded.) Ideally, for Yorke, Atoms For Peace will continue to provide the yang to Radiohead’s yin, part of a creative cycle of tension and release that yields masterful work on both ends.

While Atoms For Peace had no trouble holding down the arena, opener James Holden went over surprisingly well in the massive space, particularly for a two-man operation dishing out instrumental electronic music. Radiohead have a history of booking adventurous openers, and it’s good to see this tradition continue with Yorke’s other projects. Holden’s presence also served to place Yorke in a broader context, as a key link between the murky electronic underground vanguard and the grander gestures of arena-friendly pop and rock. If Yorke can get a few ignorant kids hopped up on the possibilities of music outside their comfort zone — or get a few hardened cynics out to an arena show — the world of music is better off for it.

Setlist:
Before Your Very Eyes…
Default
The Clock
Ingenue
Stuck Together Pieces
Unless
And It Rained All Night
Harrowdown Hill
Dropped
Cymbal Rush
Encore #1:
Skip Divided
Feeling Pulled Apart By Horses
Rabbit In Your Headlights
Paperbag Writer
Amok
Encore #2:
Atoms For Peace
Black Swan

NYC: Global Citizen Festival: A Day of Hope to End Poverty in the World

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Click here to watch the livestream.

It’s been a beautiful day in NYC.  A day of hope.  Thousands of people gathered at Central Park great lawn to give their support to this year’s Global Citizen Concert 2013 to end poverty in the world.  A huge concert is going on right now at the park. Hope is in the air.

Stevie Wonder, Alicia Keys, Kings of Leon and John Mayer  headlined the second annual Global Citizen Festival in New York’s Central Park. The artists are playing without compensation to support eradicating global poverty. “These four headlining artists are willing to play for free because they believe this generation wants to see the end of extreme poverty,” explains Hugh Evans, co-founder and CEO of Global Poverty Project, the organizers of the event along with AEG/Goldenvoice and a host of corporate supporters and altruistic organizers. “They’re all committed to that goal – in partnership with tens of thousands of global citizens.”

The focus of this year’s Global Citizen Festival is celebrating success and accelerating progress to a world without extreme poverty by 2030.  If we all, citizens of the world, get together to make this project a  reality we can end poverty in the world.

Poverty also exist right here in New York City. Did you know that one in every five NYC residents can’t bring food to their table?  Amazing, right?, being that there’re many millionaires in this city that pay a lower tax rate than you.  Find out yourself here.

And some billionaires are paying less than one percent in taxes.  Disgusting, right?

Despite making more than a billion dollars, some of the nation’s super rich manage to pay an extremely low tax rate.

The top 400 earners in the U.S. paid an average tax rate of 18 percent, according to a Bloomberg TV report noticed by Think Progress. And though that’s a far lower rate than the 26.5 percent that many families making less than $100,000 pay annually in taxes, some of America’s super-rich have been able to whittle their tax bill down even more, paying a tax rate as low as one percent, according to Bloomberg.

How? Many of the super rich take advantage of a variety of tax loopholes to lower their tax burden. For some of America’s rich, most of their wealth comes from stock appreciation, according to Mayor Bloomberg, which some billionaires don’t end up defining as taxable income.

These findings echo earlier reports, which suggest that the super rich may not be paying their full share in taxes. More than 1,400 millionaires paid no U.S. income taxes in 2009, according to an August report from the Internal Revenue Service.

In addition, 25 percent of all millionaires pay a smaller percentage of their income taxes than millions of middle class households.

But billionaires aren’t the only ones that use loopholes to pay lower taxes. Thirty of America’s most profitable corporations used rules like the “active financing exception” — allowing corporations to sidestep paying taxes on overseas profits if they were derived by “actively financing” some activity or deal — to pay less than zero in income taxes, according to a recent report from the Center for Tax Justice.

Though many super wealthy Americans and very rich corporations use loopholes to lower their tax burden, some have advocated for raising taxes on themselves. Warren Buffett became the most prominent advocate for raising taxes on the rich when he wrote an op-ed in The New York Times in August encouraging lawmakers to raise taxes on millionaires so that they pay the same or higher rate as middle class earners.

Earlier this week, a band of millionaires went to Capitol Hill to lobby Congress to raise their taxes. And they seem to have the support of millionaires around the country, nearly 70 percent of whom said in a survey last month that they support raising taxes on those making $1 million or more.

Even worse: The rabid Republicans threaten with shutting down the government!  Check your complete guide to the GOP’s campaign to shut down the government.

FOOD BANK FOR NEW YORK CITY LAUNCHES “GO ORANGE,” A CAMPAIGN TO RAISE AWARENESS OF HUNGER IN NEW YORK CITY

Watch Mayor Bloomberg report here, courtesy of ThinkProgress:

Billionaires use tax loopholes to pay 1% tax rate

Check this out:  A Food Secure NYC 2018

Now think about this: If there’s poverty in New York City which has a high concentration of  millionaires, what can be expected in those poor countries where children and adults are dying of starvation?  There are not millionaires there, some of those countries are ravaged by civil  wars.  They only have us to help them, we are their only hope.

Please think about all this and then decide whether to support and join the Global Citizen project to end poverty in the world.  Every  small contribution counts.  TAKE ACTION PLEASE!

And last but not least A BIG THANKS!  to the artists and bands that helped promote this project by performing at the concert in Central Park.

ALTER BRIDGE: Entire ‘Fortress’ Album Available For Streaming

Alter Bridge

Alter Bridge

ALTER BRIDGE‘s fourth album, “Fortress”, is available for streaming in its entirety in the YouTube clip below. Due on October 8 via EMI Label Services, the CD was helmed by longtime ALTER BRIDGE producer Michael “Elvis” Baskette, known for his work with FALLING IN REVERSE, STORY OF THE YEAR and INCUBUS, to name a few.

“Fortress” track listing:

01. Cry Of Achilles
02. Addicted To Pain
03. Bleed It Dry
04. Lover
05. The Uninvited
06. Peace Is Broken
07. Calm The Fire
08. Waters Rising
09. Farther Than The Sun
10. Cry A River
11. All Ends Well
12. Fortress

The 51st New York Film Festival Is as Varied as Its Hometown

@mx_1400

Grand Theft Auto V is coming to NYFF Convergence with two panels and a live concert

September 27 – October 13

Film Society of Lincoln Center – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center

144 W. 65th St.
New York, NY 10133

300px-Lincoln_Center_Twilight

This multiscreen theater located on Lincoln Center’s campus houses two theaters and an amphitheater for lectures, panels, and educational programs. The larger theater, the 150 seat Francesca Beale Theater shows special releases while the much smaller, 90-seat Howard Gilman Theater screens new releases and special programs.

Website: http://www.filmlinc.com/nyff2013

By Aaron Hillis

Last year’s New York Film Festival may have celebrated its golden anniversary, but the 51st edition—launching half a century plus a couple weeks after Lincoln Center’s inaugural fest—has distinctively, determinedly expanded in breadth, offering the closest NYFF has come to a something-for-every-cineast saturnalia. Among the bevy of sidebars alone are “Revivals” (11 little-screened repertory picks, including two by Holy Motors auteur Leos Carax), “Applied Science” (three docs based on ambitious non-film projects, like Google’s digitization of every book ever written), “Motion Portraits” (eight of those; don’t miss the austerely magical cable car curiosity Manakamana), “Emerging Artists” (spotlighting three features each from Mexico’s Fernando Eimbcke and the U.K.’s Joanna Hogg), plus the return of “Views from the Avant-Garde,” featuring a whopping 45 blocks of radical mind-benders.

Largely plucked off the prestigious vines of Cannes, Venice, Locarno, and Berlin, over half of this year’s record-breaking 36 main slate titles represent new work from returning NYFF filmmakers such as Catherine Breillat (Abuse of Weakness), Arnaud Desplechin (Jimmy P: Psychotherapy of a Plains Indian), Jia Zhangke (A Touch of Sin), and Spike Jonze (closing-night selection Her). It’s a sucker’s game to find rhyming themes among this wisely curated lot of formalist documentaries, one-man thrillers, period dramas, and modern comedies, so just imagine programmers Kent Jones, Dennis Lim, Marian Masone, Gavin Smith, and Amy Taubin have locked down a Netflix-style algorithm called “Masterworks and Other Bold Cinematic Visions, Minus That Mediocre Alan Partridge Farce, That You Didn’t Have to Fly to Europe to See.” With an unsurprisingly measured ratio of challenging slow-burners to red-carpet–friendly crowd-pleasers, it’s business as usual, just more so.

The action kicks off September 27 with the world premiere of Paul Greengrass’s Captain Phillips, a grimly docudramatic recount of the real-life Massachusetts seaman’s calamitous 2009 kidnapping by Somali pirates. With the director’s trademark aesthetic of handheld kineticism and punctuating zooms, this suspenseful high-seas misadventure could be seen as his third entry in some Wiki-thrills trilogy (following his similarly dour white-knucklers about historical chaos, Bloody Sunday and United 93). Politically conscious but emotionally underwhelming, Greengrass’s and screenwriter Billy Ray’s ship might have had more tug if it spent more than one scene and a couple lines of dialogue establishing how desperate motives are deeper than easy vilifications (cf. A Hijacking), but Tom Hanks—chewing through a Boston accent as the besieged Phillips—is absolutely unsinkable.

More tales of survival (uh-oh, themes are materializing): Straightforward in its storytelling and therefore a relentless, visceral experience, Steve McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave—presented here by Film Comment—tackles America’s ugly heritage of human bondage as a harrowing first-person experience without being couched in melodrama (Roots), exploitation (Mandingo) or flat-out insincerity (Django Unchained). Its dedication to authenticity and overall lack of editorializing means plenty of thoughtful year-end conversations (and cringe-inducing think pieces) about closure and reconciliation will follow, but don’t be duped by the hyperbolic who, following Telluride and Toronto, proclaimed it the one movie to cure cancer, save Christmas, or at least be the Bestest Best Picture of all time.

Forget all that hype and draw your eyes first to Jehane Noujaim’s potent doc The Square, an even more crucial, immersive, and exhilarating tale of the fight against oppression, which proves that the Egyptian Revolution didn’t end in 2011. Obviously, social media and YouTube played vital roles in the nonviolent takedown of Mubarak’s regime, but Noujaim’s intense, you-are-there observations of the passionate activists camping in Tahrir Square (including The Kite Runner star Khalid Abdalla, whose televised testimony to Anderson Cooper is enough to inspire some overturning of police cars) are more than just muckraking journalism. There’s plenty of distressing and shockingly timely footage (some shot as recently as August) that is rarely-to-never aired by American news outlets, but it doesn’t take a bullet or tear-gas pellet whizzing by the camera to frame the film as a provocative indictment of media negligence, and perhaps the limp inadequacy of the Occupy Wall Street movement.

Considering the hellacious frustrations those citizens still experience, nobody had better bitch about their poor gluteal muscles after screenings of Agnieszka Holland’s Burning Bush, her Czech miniseries about political self-immolation; Claude Lanzmann’s Shoah footnote, The Last of the Unjust; or Lav Diaz’s tough-minded Dostoyevsky reimagining, Norte, the End of History—all hovering around four hours in length. So, too, does Frederick Wiseman’s terrific microscope-view of higher education’s inner workings, At Berkeley, one of the vérité godfather’s richest features yet (a mere four and a half decades after he directed High School). Culled from several weeks of refined, riveting, fixed-camera footage, Wiseman audits a class, embeds with a large-scale student protest, sits in on meetings full of exasperated, resource-challenged faculty members, witnesses a Ph.D. student retooling bionic limbs for a disabled soldier, and winds up speaking volumes about quintessentially American struggles through the institutional microcosm. Don’t miss it, even if you think you learned these lessons from the fourth season of The Wire.

There’s far too much to cover here—including gala tributes to Ralph Fiennes and Cate Blanchett, the 12-feature-long “How Democracy Works Now” series, and a sampler for the Film Society’s forthcoming Jean-Luc Godard retrospective—but allow me to heartily recommend double features with explicit queer sex (the Palme d’Or–winning Blue is the Warmest Color and the French minimalist thriller Stranger by the Lake), fantastic soundtracks (Claire Denis’s Tindersticks-scored, unnerving noir Bastards, the Coen brothers’ ’60s-era Greenwich Village folk panorama of a talented almost-was, Inside Llewyn Davis), and giant steps forward for directors named Jim (Jarmusch’s chic, comically downbeat vampire riff, Only Lovers Left Alive, and James Gray’s formidable, old-fashioned 1920s-set melodrama, The Immigrant).

Oh, but please stop asking about Nebraska. Every festival needs their misfire to make the other programming shine brighter, but Alexander Payne’s dull-as-dirt road trip through the Midwest—as seen through the caricatured relationship between cantankerous dad Bruce Dern and his quietly incensed son Will Forte—is the kind of condescending look at funny-looking, weird-talking Americana that gives New York aesthetes a bad name.