Watch video ‘Recurrence’ by Vladislav Solovjov

Vladislav Solovjov is a 21 year old Motion designer / Film maker from Saint-Petersburg (Russia)
This video is a self-initiated project about eternity, afterlife, revival and pacification.
Enjoy!

| Headphones + Full Screen Recommended! |

Design // Render // Animation // Direction: Vladislav Solovjov

Music: Intro – Sample From The Air I Breathe
Ludovico Einaudi – Nuvole Bianche

The Strypes in New York, Jan 22, 2014 – The Studio @ Webster Hall

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Inside a small, sweaty club, four young men are tearing through songs by the likes of Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley. They wear tight suits and ties, have mops of hair and the vocalist clutches a harmonica to blow up a storm of ferocious rhythm and blues. It is, perhaps, not unlike witnessing the young Rolling Stones at the Marquee in 1962. However, the band are the Strypes, from Cavan in Ireland; their average age is 16.

Watching The Strypes perform, you’re struck by a worrying thought that these four Irish teens have been body-snatched by a band of hoary old pub rockers. On record, happily, they sound their age. Debut album ‘Snapshot’ sees the band stomp through a dozen tunes in 35 minutes, guitars squealing impressively and harmonicas wailing throughout. It’s bread and butter blues-rock, packed with lyrical anachronisms and clichés, but it’s done well and – importantly – is not as shamelessly retro as those covers-packed live shows. The downside of this is, occasionally, they sound a little bit like McFly. The upside is that The Strypes have begun to carve out a personality of their own.

Some of the Strypes’ covers – among them Diddley’s I Can Tell and Leiber/Stoller’s I’m a Hog for You Baby – were given a similar electric shock by Dr Feelgood in the 1970s; and indeed the wild-eyed, instrument-shaking guitarist Josh McClorey has more than a hint of the Canvey islanders’ Wilko Johnson.

Their original songs hold their own. Blue Collar Jane and I’m No Good are raw, three-minute, lip-curling explosions of adolescent concerns delivered with blistering musicianship. As the gig progresses, the quartet play their instruments increasingly as if they’re taming wild animals, their hair becomes more unruly, their screaming racket more thrillingly demented. There’s a wonderful moment when McClorey holds a note, stares at the crowd as if in utter shock, returns to the note and then looks up again as he crashes into a riff.

They could well become absolutely huge, and once the cancer-stricken Johnson plays his final dates this spring, he can rest knowing that a younger generation is taking up the cause.

20 Feet From Stardom: 2014′s Music Documentary Oscar Hope

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Can the world’s most soulful backline repeat Searching For Sugar Man’s golden statue win?

20 FEET FROM STARDOM, Morgan Neville’s documentary charting the lives of some of music’s greatest background singers, picked up an Oscar nomination earlier today. Its makers are hoping to recreate the success of last year’s Best Doc winner, the uplifting Rodriguez film Searching For Sugar Man.

Like …Sugar Man, 20 Feet From Stardom isn’t short of crossover potential, having already taken $5 million at the US Box Office. Its cast of singers wear their hearts on their sleeves and prove that music’s real stars aren’t always those standing at the front.

20 Feet From Stardom – Oscar nominated, out in the UK on March 28.

20 Feet From Stardom – Oscar nominated, out in the UK on March 28.

The women behind the powerhouse voices include Darlene Love (the often-uncredited star of Phil Spector’s ’60s productions), Merry Clayton (that gut-wrenching vocal on the Stones’ Gimme Shelter? That’s her), Lisa Fischer (the Stones’ lead backing singer since 1989 and the person responsible for this mind-blowing vocal), Judith Hill (booked to sing with Michael Jackson at hisz ill-fated O2 comeback shows and now singing with Stevie Wonder), Tata Vega (touring with Elton John and the voice behind the soundtrack for The Color Purple) and Claudia Lennear (Ikette, member of Joe Cocker’s legendary Mad Dogs And Englishman band and one-time Jagger squeeze).

Their stories – each peppered with heady successes, plummeting failures and some serious hard graft – are bonded by a simple desire to serve the music, to stay out of the spotlight and to maintain concentration on what they describe as “the blend”.

Whether 20 Feet From Stardom can follow the success of …Sugar Man will be decided at the Oscars ceremony on March 2. UK readers will be able to catch it when it’s released on March 28. Until then, check out the trailer below.

Ross Bennett, January 16, 2014

Film Comment’s Essential Cinema: “Gravity”

Gravity (2013) Sandra Bullock

Gravity (2013)
Sandra Bullock

The winner of Best Director at the 71st Annual Golden Globe Awards last night, Mexican director Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity is also among the 15 selections for Film Comment’s Essential Cinema series. Co-written by indexhis son Jonás, Cuarón’s film premiered at the Venice International Film Festival before screening at the Telluride Film Festival and being released in IMAX 3D to much financial and critical success across the country.

Sandra Bullock and George Clooney star in the film as astronauts who encounter several malfunctions and misfortunes while in space, with Bullock’s character becoming helplessly stranded in the process. The fim has been praised for its visual effects and lead performance from Bullock, who has received nominations from the Golden Globes, SAG awards and BAFTA for her turn here.

Sandra Bullock and George Clooney

Sandra Bullock and George Clooney

Writing for Film Comment, Scott Foundas extolled the film’s bold employment of sound.

No, this isn’t The Artist in space, although Gravity shares its DNA with an even earlier strain of silent cinema than the one referenced by that Oscar-garlanded bauble. There are voices here (belonging to two big movie stars, Sandra Bullock and George Clooney), heard in plosive bursts over radio headsets, and there are sound effects and music—bold adagio strings, in fact, from the journeyman film composer Steven Price—all of it designed to take full advantage of Atmos, the latest iteration of the Dolby sound system. But even then, the movie’s fundamental disposition remains subjective: you hear—or feel, in great, thunderous eruptions—things as Bullock’s novice astronaut does, inside her spacesuit, cast adrift by a sudden storm of debris, floating through the universe. You are there.

Gravity is currently playing in theaters and appears to be a strong contender for multiple Academy Award nominations when they were announced this Thursday morning.

Posted by Erik Luers on January 13, 2014 in The Season

French Duo Cassius Create Summer Soundtrack on ‘Sunchild’ – Song Premiere

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Putting together “Sunchild” for the Ed Banger records Ed Rec Vol. X compilation wasn’t the easiest task for French electronic duo Cassius. With a deadline looming, they were about to abandon the track altogether before Boom Bass called up his partner Philippe Zdar and told him to meet him at the studio for one last go at it.

“I threw together a very quick beat, and then recorded Hubert doing a bass line and a piano,” Zdar recalls. “Then I put down some synths and a very light live drum that we ended up keeping – one long live trip, and no editing, with even the flaws and bad fingers. We loved it. It sounded like the soundtrack to all of us having raones, sardinas or paella in our favorite Ibiza beach restaurant on a long summer lunch.”

Cassius  Duo

Cassius Duo

Now you can take an exclusive listen to “Sunchild,” which will absolutely appear on Ed Rec Vol. X, out June 11th (you can pre-order through iTunes now). The track stands as a tribute to DJ Mehdi, a beloved member of the Ed Banger family who died two years ago: “Now if I close my eyes, I can feel the warm breeze and the pine trees,” adds Zdar. “And if I listen really carefully, I can hear our dear brother Sunchild Mehdi laughing loud like he always did with his deep and warm ‘ha ha ha’s.”

Tom Waits – ‘Lie to Me’ [video]

Tom Waits -‘ Lie to Me’  (Live, Atlanta 2008)

“Lie To Me,” the opening track on a three-disc mother lode of rarities Tom Waits calls Orphans, is two minutes and 10 seconds of pure, unfiltered rock ‘n’ roll bliss. It’s not an ironic comment on rock hooliganism, or some sort of elliptical Waitsian postdoctoral thesis on the music’s history, but a handclapped backbeat twitching like it did in Memphis. And a guitar melody running cool and steady like the 8:40 local into town. And vocals, bathed in old-school reverb, that lift Waits out of the gutter long enough for him to channel the ghost of some long-dead early rock idol. Or a composite of ten of them.

Waits is a child of rock, of course. On his records he’s been cagey about it, employing discreet rockisms behind his carefully desiccated and determinedly pre-rock voice. Here, though, as he begs his baby to keep feeding his head with lies, he sounds like he’s living out the teen fantasies proffered by Elvis Presley and the Everly Brothers. He’s wild, she’s wild, the band’s crazy gone — we all want to be lied to like this.

“Lie To Me” isn’t the single best song on this overstuffed set, but it’s one of the most disarming ones, with a roar that can knock listeners sideways. That makes it a perfect tone-setter for the immense, thematically arranged outpouring that follows. By starting in this way, Waits signals that maybe we don’t know him as well as we thought — and suggests, in the most gracious way imaginable, that we ought to check all assumptions about him at the door.

Tom Waits’ unique vocal style and devoted following has such appeal to advertisers that they have resorted to using sound-alikes when Waits turns down requests to use his original music. That has led the artist to take legal action.

Dawes Live @ Crystal Ballroom, Portland Oregon

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Dawes has spent a good deal of time with rock royalty during its short lifespan. They backed up Robbie Robertson of the Band, as well as opened up for Bob Dylan on his spring tour, earning them a bigger following and perhaps even more confidence as performers. Now, Dawes is headlining their own shows at larger venues in support of their third studio album, Stories Don’t End. Comprised of brothers Taylor (vocals, guitar) and Griffin Goldsmith (drums) as well as Wylie Gelber (bass) and Tay Strathairn (Keyboards), Dawes co-headlined a show with Dr. Dog at Portland’s Crystal Ballroom. Heavily influenced by ’70s rock such as Crosby Stills Nash, the Band, Creedence Clearwater Revival and Jackson Browne, Dawes brought their free and easy music to a small, but appreciative crowd.

After Dr Dog’s set, a significant amount of the crowd left, never to return. That was expected considering it was a Sunday evening and Dawes didn’t go on until 10:45. However the band remained unfazed and energetic. They came on and dove right into the catchy chord progression of “Most People.” Taylor with messy hair and a tight white button-up shirt, confidently and passionately belted out his vocals.

All of the instruments sounded tight, despite the muffled acoustics of the Crystal Ballroom. The hour and 15 minute set was mostly filled with songs from their new album, peppered by a few older ones. Taylor showed off his guitar chops on solos during “Most People” and “From a Window Seat”, shredding on his white Telecaster as he hopped across the stage. Taylor didn’t speak very much to the audience, besides, “What’s up Portland? We’re Dawes.” All four members made facial expressions that even Bruce Springsteen would be proud of, grimacing through each song.

Even though the crowd was small, the group that stuck around were very engaged. From the start of the show, the majority of the audience sang along . “From a Window Seat” and “Time Spent in Los Angeles” definitely got the biggest reaction from fans including three guys in their mid-twenties who stood together, arms around each other as they enthusiastically jumped around and sang along.

The energy that Dawes brought to the stage makes them a band I definitely would recommend seeing live. As each new album comes out, the songs become more mature. It will be interesting to see them continue to progress as a band and as showmen.

You must watch these guys live!

  • Venue:
    Crystal Ballroom
  • City/State:
    Portland, OR
  • Date:
    04/28/13