Trent Reznor Blasts Grammys With ‘A Heartfelt F–k You’ Tweet

Queens of the Stone Age Thrash Grammys With Dave Grohl, Trent Reznor

Daft Punk’s big night at the Grammys turned into Taiwanese animation!!!

The Big question at the Grammys: Can someone tell me who the fuck Daft Punk is?

As you may recall, following Arcade Fire’s earth-shattering Album of the Year win at the 2012 Grammys, a Tumblr page was launched compiling various tweets asking, “Who is Arcade Fire?”. Though music writers and bloggers chuckled along, it wasn’t that outrageous of a question. At the time, Arcade Fire was still a relatively unknown band to mainstream America, a quirky group of Canadians signed to an independent record label and who dressed in funny outfits.

Surely, Daft Punk wouldn’t suffer from similar obscurity. After all, Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo have been heavyweights in music for two decades, with more than a few chart-topping songs to their name. They’ve even performed at the Grammys before, teaming with Kanye West for “Stronger”. So, yea, surely no one would tweet, “Who is Daft Punk?”.

"I thought we were known here.... "

“I thought we were known here…. “

Music fans weren’t the only ones disappointed by CBS pulling the plug early on the Grammys finale last night. About 45 minutes after the broadcast, Nine Inch Nails frontman Trent Reznor unleashed an invective on Twitter at the awards show’s organizers, playing with its tagline. “Music’s biggest night. . . to be disrespected. A heartfelt FUCK YOU guys,” he wrote.

“Music’s biggest night. . . to be disrespected,” NIN leader wrote after show-ending performance was cut off.

Although Nine Inch Nails, Queens of the Stone Age and Dave Grohl were all nominated for Grammys this year, only the drummer took home a trophy what Jay Z affectionately called a “gold sippy cup.” The Foo Fighters frontman Grammys for Best Rock Song – for “Cut Me Some Slack,” his collaboration with Paul McCartney and former members of Nirvana – and for Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media for Sound City: Real to Reel, an album that featured him playing with Reznor and Queens’ Josh Homme on the track “Mantra.”

Queens of the Stone Age had been nominated in three categories. And finally, likely adding to Reznor’s ire, Nine Inch Nails’ 2013 LP Hesitation Marks had been nominated for Best Alternative Music Album. It lost to Vampire Weekend, whose Modern Vampires of the City earned them the trophy.

grohl-reznor-homme

Video: Dave Grohl, Trent Reznor, Josh Homme, and Lindsey Buckingham destroy Grammys

VIDEO IS BLOCKED!!!

Trent Reznor Blasts Grammys With ‘A Heartfelt Fuck You’ Tweet.

What better way to close out the 2014 Grammys then with a super group for the ages. Dave Grohl, Trent Reznor, Josh Homme, and Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham joined forces for an epic, once-in-a-life performance of rock and roll excellence. Homme and Buckingham manned guitar and Grohl did his thing on drums as Reznor got things start with a rendition of Nine Inch Nails’ “Copy of A”. Homme then took over lead for Queens of the Stone Age’s “My God Is the Sun”, though was tragically cut short in favor of a Delta commercial. Bet that would never have happened to Taylor Swift. #NoRespect. Catch the replay below.

For a complete list of Grammy winners (who cares???), click here. Watch other Grammy performances, including Beyoncé and Jay Z, Paul McCartney, Kendrick Lamar, Metallica, Lorde, and more, by clicking here.

The awards show had been running about 15 minutes late by the time Nine Inch Nails took the stage with Queens of the Stone Age, Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham and Dave Grohl. The supergroup was able to play two songs – NIN’s “Copy of A” and most of Queens of the Stone Age’s “My God Is the Sun” – before the TV network ran ads for its programming and for an airline sponsor, all with the music going on in the background. Considering the group members had all played together in various configurations, the rest of their set remained a mystery to TV viewers.

WHAT A MESS!

The Strange Death of Gram Parsons: 1973

American singer and songwriter Gram Parsons may have rather been known for his music than a burning body in the desert. Watch video below.

The Strange Death of Gram Parsons: 1973

Published by ebni byrds watchers

To read about the last Gram Parsons tour and album, see Gram Parsons & the Fallen Angels: 1972-1973. This section covers the death of Gram Parsons in some detail. Although his music is by far the most vital part of the Gram Parsons story, his death is the first introduction to that story for many people. Perhaps some of those looking to read about that death will be persuaded by other parts of the profile to check out his music too. So think of this section as being sort of like sex education… Since the events of that day are the subject of so many myths, mistakes, and mysteries, better to describe frankly those events (as best as they can ever be known now) than to have people believing the even wilder gossip they pick up on the street.

Joshua Tree:

The foursome arrived Monday, September 17, 1973. That day they indulged sufficiently that Martin returned to Los Angeles the next morning to score more marijuana — even though Martin theoretically went along on the trip so he could look after Parsons. Parsons dragged the women out to the airport for lunch, throughout which he drank Jack Daniels non-stop.

When they returned from lunch, McElroy excused herself — she couldn’t drink because she was recovering from hepatitis, and she wasn’t having any fun watching Parsons drink.

Meanwhile, Parsons scored some heroin in town and then topped it off with morphine he acquired from a drug connection, who was staying at the Inn. Several hours later, a wasted Fisher showed up at McElroy’s door in a frantic state. Parsons had overdosed, she said. They grabbed some ice and went to Room 1, where he was passed out on the floor, blue. There Fisher revived him with an ice cube suppository — an old street remedy for overdoses. When McElroy left the two alone again, he was walking around the room, seemingly recovered.

After another hour or so, at about 10:00, Fisher returned to McElroy’s room and asked her to sit with the sleeping Parsons while she went out to get some dinner. McElroy grabbed a book and went to Parsons’s room — Room 8. After a few minutes, she realized that his breathing had gone from normal to labored. McElroy had no experience with drug overdoses and no training in CPR. Believing (incorrectly) that there were no other people in the hotel, she never called out for help. Instead she tried to get him breathing again by pumping his back and his chest and giving him mouth-to-mouth. “I tried to figure out whether to stay and keep him breathing or leave and get some help…. I figured if I left, he might die.

After about a half hour of futile pumping and pushing, McElroy realized that Parsons was probably beyond help. At this point Margaret Fisher returned, then left to call an ambulance. The rescue crew arrived quickly, but concluded that CPR would not be successful. They got Parsons to the nearby Hi-Desert Memorial Hospital in Yucca Valley by 12:15 AM. The doctors there found no pulse and, after trying unsuccessfully to restart his heart, declared him dead at 12:30 AM, Wednesday, September 19, 1973.

The press were told that Parsons had died of natural causes, but after performing an autopsy, the coroner listed the cause of death as “drug toxicity, days, due to multiple drug use, weeks.”* A blood test showed a blood alcohol level of 0.21% — high, but nowhere near fatal standing alone. No morphine showed in the blood test, though it did turn up in more than trace amounts in urine and liver tests. The urinalysis also revealed traces of cocaine and barbiturates. Since substances may accumulate in the body over a long time, it’s unclear from the urine and liver tests whether Parsons used morphine, cocaine or barbiturates that day.

Fisher and McElroy were questioned by the police at the hospital. McElroy called Phil Kaufman in Los Angeles, who persuaded the sheriff that he could answer all their questions as soon as he arrived. The sheriff then permitted Fisher and McElroy to stay at the motel until Kaufman arrived. When Kaufman got to the hotel, the women gave him Parsons’s drugs, which they had gathered up before the ambulance and police arrived.* Kaufman took the drugs and hid them in the desert, then called the police station. He promised the police he would bring McElroy and Fisher in for further questioning, then piled them in his car and drove them straight back to LA, where he hid them out for a few days. The Joshua Tree police never sought out the two women.

Both Margaret Fisher and Alan Barbary, the son of the hotel owners, told conflicting versions of that night’s events, which added to the confusion and exaggeration that soon surrounded the death of Gram Parsons.

To read about the last Gram Parsons tour and album, see Gram Parsons & the Fallen Angels: 1972-1973. This section covers the death of Gram Parsons in some detail. Although his music is by far the most vital part of the Gram Parsons story, his death is the first introduction to that story for many people. Perhaps some of those looking to read about that death will be persuaded by other parts of the profile to check out his music too. So think of this section as being sort of like sex education… Since the events of that day are the subject of so many myths, mistakes, and mysteries, better to describe frankly those events (as best as they can ever be known now) than to have people believing the even wilder gossip they pick up on the street.

The foursome arrived Monday, September 17, 1973. That day they indulged sufficiently that Martin returned to Los Angeles the next morning to score more marijuana — even though Martin theoretically went along on the trip so he could look after Parsons. Parsons dragged the women out to the airport for lunch, throughout which he drank Jack Daniels non-stop.

When they returned from lunch, McElroy excused herself — she couldn’t drink because she was recovering from hepatitis, and she wasn’t having any fun watching Parsons drink.

Meanwhile, Parsons scored some heroin in town and then topped it off with morphine he acquired from a drug connection, who was staying at the Inn. Several hours later, a wasted Fisher showed up at McElroy’s door in a frantic state. Parsons had overdosed, she said. They grabbed some ice and went to Room 1, where he was passed out on the floor, blue. There Fisher revived him with an ice cube suppository — an old street remedy for overdoses. When McElroy left the two alone again, he was walking around the room, seemingly recovered.

After another hour or so, at about 10:00, Fisher returned to McElroy’s room and asked her to sit with the sleeping Parsons while she went out to get some dinner. McElroy grabbed a book and went to Parsons’s room — Room 8. After a few minutes, she realized that his breathing had gone from normal to labored. McElroy had no experience with drug overdoses and no training in CPR. Believing (incorrectly) that there were no other people in the hotel, she never called out for help. Instead she tried to get him breathing again by pumping his back and his chest and giving him mouth-to-mouth. “I tried to figure out whether to stay and keep him breathing or leave and get some help…. I figured if I left, he might die.”

After about a half hour of futile pumping and pushing, McElroy realized that Parsons was probably beyond help. At this point Margaret Fisher returned, then left to call an ambulance. The rescue crew arrived quickly, but concluded that CPR would not be successful. They got Parsons to the nearby Hi-Desert Memorial Hospital in Yucca Valley by 12:15 AM. The doctors there found no pulse and, after trying unsuccessfully to restart his heart, declared him dead at 12:30 AM, Wednesday, September 19, 1973.

The press were told that Parsons had died of natural causes, but after performing an autopsy, the coroner listed the cause of death as “drug toxicity, days, due to multiple drug use, weeks.”* A blood test showed a blood alcohol level of 0.21% — high, but nowhere near fatal standing alone. No morphine showed in the blood test, though it did turn up in more than trace amounts in urine and liver tests. The urinalysis also revealed traces of cocaine and barbiturates. Since substances may accumulate in the body over a long time, it’s unclear from the urine and liver tests whether Parsons used morphine, cocaine or barbiturates that day.

Fisher and McElroy were questioned by the police at the hospital. McElroy called Phil Kaufman in Los Angeles, who persuaded the sheriff that he could answer all their questions as soon as he arrived. The sheriff then permitted Fisher and McElroy to stay at the motel until Kaufman arrived. When Kaufman got to the hotel, the women gave him Parsons’s drugs, which they had gathered up before the ambulance and police arrived.* Kaufman took the drugs and hid them in the desert, then called the police station. He promised the police he would bring McElroy and Fisher in for further questioning, then piled them in his car and drove them straight back to LA, where he hid them out for a few days. The Joshua Tree police never sought out the two women.

Both Margaret Fisher and Alan Barbary, the son of the hotel owners, told conflicting versions of that night’s events, which added to the confusion and exaggeration that soon surrounded the death of Gram Parsons.

Safe at Home:

When the news of his stepson’s death reached Bob Parsons, he immediately realized that his own interests would be best served by having the body buried in Louisiana, where the senior Parsons lived. Parsons knew that under Louisiana’s Napoleonic code, his adopted son’s estate would pass in its entirety to the nearest living male — Bob Parsons — notwithstanding any will provisions to the contrary. But the code would only apply if Bob Parsons could prove that Gram Parsons had been a resident of Louisiana. Burying the younger Parsons in New Orleans would bolster the tenuous arguments for Louisiana residency. Bob Parsons booked a flight to LA to claim the body. At stake was his stepson’s share of the dwindling but still substantial Snively fortune.

When Phil Kaufman learned of the plan to bury his friend in New Orleans, he became distraught. He knew that Parsons had no connection whatsoever to that city. He knew that Parsons had little use for his stepfather, and would not have wanted any of his estate to pass to him. He knew that Parsons had not wanted a long, depressing, religious service with family and friends. Most of all he knew he had made a pact with Parsons, at the funeral of Clarence White: whoever died first, “the survivor would take the other guy’s body out to Joshua Tree, have a few drinks and burn it.”

After a day of vodka-enhanced self-recriminations, Kaufman decided he had to try to make good on his promise. Thus began one of the most unforgettable episodes of what hackers call “social engineering.” For the full story, check out Kaufman’s biography, Road Mangler Deluxe, which describes the whole episode in Kaufman’s own inimitable fashion. What follows is only a taste of Kaufman’s tale.

Kaufman called the funeral parlor in the town of Joshua Tree and managed to learn that the body would be driven to LAX and then flown on Continental to New Orleans. He called the airline’s mortuary service and found out that the body would arrive that evening. Kaufman recruited Michael Martin, who knew about the pact, and commandeered a hearse of Dale McElroy’s, which she and Martin used for camping trips. It had no license plates and several broken windows, but it would do. They tried on suits, but decided they looked so ridiculous that they changed into their tour clothes — Levi’s, cowboy boots, cowboy hats, and jackets with the legend “Sin City” stitched on the back. They loaded the hearse up with beer and Jack Daniels and headed for LAX.

Kaufman and Martin arrived at the loading dock just as a flatbed truck rolled up with the Parsons casket. A drunken Kaufman somehow persuaded an airline employee that the Parsons family had changed its plans and wanted to ship the body privately on a chartered flight.

While Kaufman was in the hangar office, signing the paperwork with a phony name, a policeman pulled up, blocking the hangar door. Kaufman was sure his operation would be shut down, but the officer didn’t do anything — he just sat there. So Kaufman walked out to him, waved his copies of the paperwork, and said, “Hey, can you move that car?” The officer apologized, moved the car, and then, remarkably, helped Kaufman load the casket onto a gurney and into the back of the unlicensed, liquor-filled hearse.

Martin, also liquor-filled, got in the hearse and headed out of the hangar, only to run into the wall on his way out. The officer observed all this, and commented ruefully, “I wouldn’t want to be in your shoes now.” Then he left, and the two drunk bodysnatchers departed the airport with the body of their friend. They stopped at a gas station and filled a gas can with high test (“I didn’t want him to ping,” Kaufman says.) Then they headed back for Joshua Tree.

They reached the Monument and drove until they were too drunk to drive any farther. There, near the Cap Rock, a landmark geological formation, they unloaded their friend’s coffin. Then Kaufman saw car lights in the distance and concluded the police were coming. He quickly doused his friend with fuel and lit him. The two watched as a giant fireball rose from the coffin, sucking his ashes into the desert night. Then they abandoned the charred remains and headed for LA.

After a trip home filled with close calls, Kaufman and Martin laid low. The morning after their return, the papers were full of the story of the rock star’s hijacked and burnt corpse, playing up baseless speculation by local police that the amateur cremation may have been “ritualistic.”

Kaufman knew the police were looking for him, so after a few weeks, he and Martin just turned themselves in. They appeared in West L.A. Municipal Court on Parsons’s 27th birthday — November 5, 1973. Since a corpse has no intrinsic value, the two were charged with misdemeanor theft for stealing the coffin and given a slap on the wrist: $708 in damages for the coffin, and a $300 fine for each of the bodysnatchers. Kaufman has surely made that amount back just dining out on the story — his misadventures have been legendary in rock and country music circles ever since.

The aftermath of the court’s sentence was as unlikely as the events leading up to it. Kaufman threw himself a party to raise the fine money — Kaufman’s Koffin Kaper Koncert. They pasted beer bottles with some homemade labels featuring a bad likeness of Parsons and the legend, “Gram Pilsner: A stiff drink for what ales you.” Dr. Demento served as deejay, and live music was provided by Bobby “Boris” Pickett and the Crypt Kickers of “Monster Mash” fame and a young band being managed by Tickner and Kaufman at the time, Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers. Despite the gruesome streak running through the party, it was a memorable wake for their friend.

On the other side of the country, some other friends mourned Parsons in a somewhat quieter fashion. Emmylou Harris met with John Nuese, Bill Keith, and Holly and Barry Tashian for a quiet weekend at the Tashians’ cottage in Connecticut, where they listened for the first time to finished versions of the sessions from Grievous Angel (Reprise, 1974).

We’ll Sweep Out the Ashes in the Morning:

Gram Parsons left more than his share of loose ends.

Bob Parsons had the charred remains of his stepson shipped to New Orleans, where, after a small service with family only, he was buried in The Garden of Memories, an unimpressive cemetery on a highway near the airport. A bronze plaque marks the gravesite; it reads “God’s Own Singer.” Although Bob Parsons succeeded in getting the body to Louisiana, his scheme to seize control of the Snively fortune was nevertheless thwarted by a Florida court. About a year later, Bob Parsons died of an alcohol-related illness. He never made a dime off of Gram Parsons.

When Parsons left for Joshua Tree, he believed he had initiated divorce proceedings against Gretchen. As it turned out, this was not the case. Kaufman had the papers to serve on her but hadn’t yet done so by the time Parsons died. Along with Gretchen Parsons, his daughter Polly, his sister Avis, and his half-sister Diane all received some money from his estate as well.

Reprise finally released Grievous Angel (Reprise, 1974) in January of 1974 to rave reviews. Yet, despite the notoriety resulting from the death of Parsons, the LP peaked at a disappointing #195 on the album chart.

Despite his lack of commercial success, Gram Parsons acquired a small but fervent following. These fans paid for a plaque that was placed near the Cap Rock, with the words “Safe At Home.”

You’re Still On My Mind:

Twenty-two years after the death of Gram Parsons, his music is still very much with us. His major releases, from Safe at Home (LHI, 1968) to Grievous Angel, are currently available in the States, at least on import, as are compilations such as Farther Along (A&M, 1988) and Out of the Blue (A&M UK, 1996). Cosmic American Music (Magnum America, 1995) featured rehearsal tapes for GP, while Live 1973 (Sierra, 1994) offered a live performance by the Fallen Angels.

Cosmic American Music also lives on in the music of others, from Emmylou Harris to Country Gazette to the Eagles, from Elvis Costello to Tom Petty to the Long Ryders, from the Mekons to the Jayhawks to Uncle Tupelo. Today there is an explosion of country-influenced rock, as chronicled in the magazine No Depression, among other places. It’s clear now that Gram Parsons and his music will not be forgotten.

Know More About It:

Nearly all of the Gram Parsons catalog is available through Sierra Records. Sierra is currently preparing for the release of a Gram Parsons CD called The Early Years, which will feature the tracks from the earlier Shilos release, plus nine solo tracks recorded in New York with Dick Weissman, and concluding with the four early single sides by International Submarine Band. Sierra also specializes in the work of Clarence White, Gene Clark, and Gene Parsons. Anyone interested in these artists should check out their website (temporarily offline as this is written but due back soon) at http://www.sierra-records.com. You can also write for the Sierra catalog at the following address:

Sierra Records
P.O. Box 5853
Pasadena, California 91117-0853

You can also request their catalog by e-mail at sierra@sure.net.

Remembering the Grievous Angel: Gram Parsons

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Cecil Ingram Connor III (November 5, 1946 – September 19, 1973), known professionally as Gram Parsons, was an American singer, songwriter, guitarist, and pianist. Parsons is best known for his work within the country music genre; he also popularized what he called “Cosmic American Music”, a hybrid of country, rhythm and blues, soul, folk, and rock. Besides recording as a solo artist, he also worked in several notable bands, including the International Submarine Band, The Byrds, and The Flying Burrito Brothers. His relatively short career is described by Allmusic as “enormously influential” for both country and rock, “blending the two genres to the point that they became indistinguishable from each other.”

“A VOICE THAT WOULD break and crack but rise pure and beautiful and full of sweetness and pain.” – Emmylou Harris describes her friend and musical soul mate, Gram Parsons, in the liner notes for 1976′s Sleepless Nights.

Just 26 when he died in September 1973, the man born Cecil Ingram Connor III in Winter Haven, Florida on November 5, 1946 packed a lot into his quarter century. His commitment to blending his beloved country music – this was the man who taught Keith Richards the difference between the Nashville and Bakersville sounds – with the world of rock saw him work his way through The International Submarine Band, The Byrds and, most significantly, The Flying Burrito Brothers, before recording two solo albums that have become touchstones for those seeking the full-powered hit of mythic American music.

He may not have had the best voice in the business, but with master musicians like Chris Hillman and Emmylou Harris at his side, the ache, tenderness and vulnerability of the country boy with the hippie threads can really be something to behold.

Parsons And The Rolling Stones

You can hear, in songs like “Luxury Liner,” the country rock sound that would become his signature, so it was a perfect match when Gram hooked up with Chris Hillman and the Byrds in Los Angeles in the late 60s. They recorded a seminal album called “Sweetheart of the Rodeo” in 1968.

It was around this time that Gram Parsons found another soulmate in Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones. They bonded over their mutual love of music and unfortunately drugs.

Stones biographer Robert Greenfield calls them the psychedelic version of Don and Phil, the Everly brothers. Parsons was hanging out with Keith in France in 1971, while the Stones recorded “Exile on Main Street,” and while he doesn’t play on that record, his stamp is all over it, especially the steel guitar sound on songs like “Torn and Frayed.”