Lykke Li’s new song “Gunshot”

Lykke Li

Lykke Li

 

 

Lykke Li has unveiled “Gunshot”, the second single from her upcoming third studio album, I Never Learn, due out May 5th via LL/Atlantic Records. Similar to last month’s “No Rest For The Wicked”, Li pairs emotionally-gripping lyrics with surprisingly bombastic musical accompaniment. However, as opposed to simply focusing her sorrow inward, keeping it buried within her own soul, she’s now striving for personal catharsis, unearthing layers of anguish and deep-seated regret over a somewhat danceable medley of arena-rock guitars and dusty blues piano. Listen to the song here.

For more sounds, check out the teaser track “Love Me Like I’m Not Made of Stone” and “Du är den ende”, written specifically for Swedish crime thriller Tommy.

 

 

I Never Learn Tracklist:
01. I Never Learn
02. No Rest for the Wicked
03. Just Like a Dream
04. Silverline
05. Gunshot
06. Love Me Like I’m Not Made of Stone
07. Never Gonna Love Again
08. Heart of Steel
09. Sleeping Alone

 

The Space Project: Listen to Individual Tracks from the Album

The Space Project comes out on Record Store Day, which takes place April 19.

The Space Project comes out on Record Store Day, which takes place April 19.

 

As of last September — some 36 years after their launch on Sept. 5, 1977 — NASA’s Voyager 1 & 2 space probes were some 12 billion miles from home, easily the farthest man-made objects from Earth. Voyager’s primary mission ended back in 1980, when both satellites provided the closest, most detailed pictures taken of the gaseous planets of Jupiter and Saturn and their moons before continuing outward into space.

But in addition to their planet-photographing abilities, both Voyagers also contain instruments able to record the electromagnetic radiation fluctuations of those heavenly bodies — which means they can pick up what truly is the harmony of the spheres. And since each body — be it an asteroid, Saturn or any of Jupiter’s numerous moons — has a unique mass and elemental make-up, each emits a different “sound.” Spread across seven seven-inch singles to be released on Record Store Day (along with a CD, digital and regular vinyl release), Lefse Records’ The Space Project compilation features 14 modern bands and electronic-music producers who imbibe and ground such cosmic noise into an earthly delight.

For some acts, adding actual “space” to their space-rock is a given. Chilean duo The Holydrug Couple deploys leisurely drums and heavily reverbed guitars and organ in “Amphitrites Lost,” then has the song dilate midway through to allow in the noise of Neptune herself. Former Lungfish member Asa Osbourne’s spare project Zomes embraces the transmissions of Saturn for the haunting and hushed ambient drift of “Moonlet.”

The lineage of artists and composers imagining the sounds of our solar system — think the exotic bachelor-pad swing of Esquivel, the outré transmissions of Sun Ra or the “New World” weirdness of — is vast, and not every conjuring of the cosmos is so reverent. DFA’s Larry Gus pays tribute to the moon Io and fills in all that space with Henry Mancini hi-hats, caffeinated piano lines, krautrock bass and garbled transmissions. And Blues Control weaves and floats in “Blues Danube” like a UFO operator about to get a DUI.

Curiously, The Space Project’s finest moments are its most terrestrial. Beach House suggests not so much the weightlessness of space as the sensation of floating in a warm pond in “Saturn Song.” And space-rock master Jason Pierce and Spiritualized’s “Always Together With You (The Bridge Song)” meanders about before swan-diving into the interplanetary noise of its source. Ever so subtly, it announces: “Ladies and gentlemen, we are floating on earth.”

 

 

 

 

 

‘Farewell Transmission: The Music Of Jason Molina’

Singer/songwriter Jason Molina

Singer/songwriter Jason Molina –   Steve Gullick/Courtesy of the artist

 

Farewell Transmission: The Music of Jason Molina comes out April 22.

Jason Molina never sang to — or for — the many. The singer-songwriter, who died last year at 39, gave voice to despair and solitude, and to a lonely pursuit of the comfort and strength necessary to face each day. Whether he performed as Songs: Ohia, or Jason Molina, his big, yearning voice encountered only a small but intense cult following that heard in him a crucial combination of fatalism and fighting spirit.

Like many whose fan bases run narrow but deep, Molina was widely beloved by musicians; anyone who’s ever tried to channel the blues would know how pure his were. Within the last year, Molina has already inspired two double-length tribute albums, each intended to help his family and spread word of his work. Both, while naturally uneven in execution, nicely convey the sturdiness of Molina’s songcraft — not to mention his considerable gift for quotable melancholy.

Farewell Transmission: The Music of Jason Molina is the newer of the two collections — the other is last year’s — with proceeds split between the singer’s family and a charity called MusiCares, which battles Molina’s twin demons of alcoholism and depression. In 27 songs and just less than two hours, it provides a fine overview of the singer’s best-known work, highlighted by ‘s suitably epic take on the title track.

Given the reverence in which Molina’s work is held, it’s no surprise that Farewell Transmission rarely strays far from the singer’s original intentions, though it’s intriguing to hear Squares recast the almost impossibly desolate “” as a bold rock song. Molina’s former bandmates even come together as Memorial Electric Company to perform a new track, “Arm in Arm,” as well as to tackle the unrecorded Molina song “Trouble in Mind (Fade to Blue).” Between the incredible source material and a fine assortment of contributors — including , Murder by Death, Catherine Irwin, and another past Molina collaborator, Will Johnson of — Farewell Transmission marks a fine way to both celebrate a great career and mourn a man for whom mournfulness was stitched into the fabric of his art.