Global Research Org: Confirmed: U.S. Armed Al Qaeda to Topple Libya’s Gaddaffi

The U.S. “Switched Sides” to Support Al Qaeda

Posted by Global Research Organization

We reported in 2012 that the U.S. supported Al Qaeda in Libya in its effort to topple Gadaffi:

The U.S. supported opposition which overthrew Libya’s Gadaffi was largely comprised of Al Qaeda terrorists.

According to a 2007 report by West Point’s Combating Terrorism Center’s center, the Libyan city of Benghazi was one of Al Qaeda’s main headquarters – and bases for sending Al Qaeda fighters into Iraq – prior to the overthrow of Gaddafi:

The Hindustan Times reported last year:

“There is no question that al Qaeda’s Libyan franchise, Libyan Islamic Fighting Group, is a part of the opposition,” Bruce Riedel, former CIA officer and a leading expert on terrorism, told Hindustan Times.

It has always been Qaddafi’s biggest enemy and its stronghold is Benghazi.

Al Qaeda is now largely in control of Libya.  Indeed, Al Qaeda flags were flown over the Benghazi courthouse once Gaddafi was toppled.

(Incidentally, Gaddafi was on the verge of invading Benghazi in 2011, 4 years after the West Point report cited Benghazi as a hotbed of Al Qaeda terrorists. Gaddafi claimed – rightly it turns out – that Benghazi was an Al Qaeda stronghold and a main source of the Libyan rebellion.  But NATO planes stopped him, and protected Benghazi.)

The Daily Mail reported yesterday:

A self-selected group of former top military officers, CIA insiders and think-tankers, declared Tuesday in Washington that a seven-month review of the deadly 2012 terrorist attack has determined that it could have been prevented – if the U.S. hadn’t beenhelping to arm al-Qaeda militias throughout Libya a year earlier.

‘The United States switched sides in the war on terror with what we did in Libya, knowingly facilitating the provision of weapons to known al-Qaeda militias and figures,’ Clare Lopez, a member of the commission and a former CIA officer, told MailOnline.

She blamed the Obama administration for failing to stop half of a $1 billion United Arab Emirates arms shipment from reaching al-Qaeda-linked militants.

‘Remember, these weapons that came into Benghazi were permitted to enter by our armed forces who were blockading the approaches from air and sea,’ Lopez claimed. ‘They were permitted to come in. … [They] knew these weapons were coming in, and that was allowed..

‘The intelligence community was part of that, the Department of State was part of that, and certainly that means that the top leadership of the United States, our national security leadership, and potentially Congress – if they were briefed on this – also knew about this.’

***

‘The White House and senior Congressional members,’ the group wrote in an interim report released Tuesday, ‘deliberately and knowingly pursued a policy that provided material support to terrorist organizations in order to topple a ruler [Muammar Gaddafi] who had been working closely with the West actively to suppress al-Qaeda.’

‘Some look at it as treason,’ said Wayne Simmons, a former CIA officer who participated in the commission’s research.

The same thing is happening in Syria. The U.S. “switched sides” and is supporting our arch enemy Al Qaeda.

Specifically, the Benghazi “embassy” became the CIA headquarters for transferring – after Gaddaffi fell – weapons in Libya to the Syrian Al Qaeda rebels, as confirmed by Pulitzer prize winning reporter Sy Hersh.

A Millionaire Saves The Silenced Symphonies Of Pakistan

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Izzat Majeed address a crowd in New York during a collaborative concert between Sachal Studios musicians and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. The Lahore-born philanthropist founded a recording studio and provided opportunities for musicians in Pakistan. Hiroyuki Ito/Getty Images

The city street where Sachal Studios is located looks like any other in Lahore, Pakistan. There are tea stalls and rickshaws and grimy car repair shops.

But it doesn’t quite sound the same — or more precisely, there’s a sound that Pakistanis have begun to forget.

Inside Sachal Studios, an orchestra is in rehearsal. The musicians are all men. Most are old enough to be grandfathers.

Their skills were going out of fashion in Pakistan. Now, they’re winning applause worldwide.

The city street where Sachal Studios is located looks like any other in Lahore, Pakistan. There are tea stalls and rickshaws and grimy car repair shops.

But it doesn’t quite sound the same — or more precisely, there’s a sound that Pakistanis have begun to forget.

Inside Sachal Studios, an orchestra is in rehearsal. The musicians are all men. Most are old enough to be grandfathers.

Their skills were going out of fashion in Pakistan. Now, they’re winning applause worldwide.

Home And Away

It’s not easy running an orchestra in Pakistan. Some skills do seem to have vanished, Majeed says.

“I can’t find a single piano player in Lahore, maybe in Pakistan, a real piano player,” Majeed says. “People come and say, ‘Oh, I can play,’ but he can play atrociously — he doesn’t know what the piano, the real piano, is. There’s no brass left. Brass is dead.”

When Sachal musicians go on tour abroad — to, say, London or New York — they hook up with outside musicians. That includes some big names, among them Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra.

The studio orchestra is now firmly on the map.

It recently released its second album, Jazz and All That. There’s more Brubeck, among other Western classics by The Beatles, Jacques Brel, Antonio Carlos Jobim, R.E.M. — all with a South Asian flavor.

The weird thing is, Mushtaq Soofi says, while the old Lollywood session men are now winning plaudits abroad, no one back home knows or cares much about them.

“Music has to be recognized, and there is no patronage for music in Pakistan,” Soofi says. “That is why people are upset, musicians are upset. If you sing, if you are a singer or a vocalist, you get kind of fame and name and money, but if you are a musician, a pure musician, people don’t bother much about you.”

The only people who do bother about you tend to be the religious extremists, like the Taliban.

“It is very difficult for musicians, because music is considered forbidden because it is un-Islamic,” cellist Ghulam Abbas says. “Yet the same people think it is acceptable to kill people.”

Be that as it may, Abbas says he isn’t planning to hang up his cello again.

Neon Trees, The Mormon Band Who Made It Big, On Honesty

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To look at the members of Neon Trees — their technicolor clothes, skinny ties, hair bleached and lacquered into gravity-defying shapes — you might fairly place them in the same musical lineage that spawned bands like and . (They’ve toured with both.) But the culture from which the musicians emerged is a story unto itself. Singer Tyler Glenn, drummer Elaine Brady, guitarist Chris Allen and bassist Branden Campbell are all members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints — a fact that has dominated discussion about the band since Glenn in March.

Neon Trees’ latest release, Pop Psychology, continues its steady arc of catchy, danceable pop-rock — though the lyrics, Glenn says, often deal with the conflicts of identity and faith he dealt with while in the closet. He and Bradley spoke with NPR’s Scott Simon; hear the radio version at the audio link, and read more of their conversation below.

SCOTT SIMON: I’m just guessing that more people who want to be musicians leave Provo for Southern California than vice-versa. How did you folks decide, “We want to go into music. Let’s head for Provo’?

TYLER GLENN: Chris, our guitar player, ended up going to school there — massage school, of all trades. We’re both Southern California natives and we’d ended up just clicking when we started playing music together, so I followed him there. I was the same way; I didn’t think Provo would be the spot. But when I got there I was quickly surprised that there was an actual scene. There’s a college there, really cool bands, and Elaine and Branden were in some of those bands.

ELAINE BRADLEY: I’m from Chicago originally. I went to Utah to go to BYU, and I thought that I was leaving the mecca of music and my career would be over, you know? But I wanted to be practical, so I wanted to go get a degree. And it’s funny that arriving in Provo was really refreshing, that the music scene was so vibrant, and even competitive to a certain extent — which, I don’t know, helps me strive for excellence. If I hadn’t moved to Utah, I definitely wouldn’t be in the position I’m in now.

SIMON: If I may: I don’t understand how you get music clubs when they can’t sell alcohol.

BRADLEY: Yeah, it’s very interesting, because the clubs in Provo don’t do it. I thought that was going to be a terrible thing, but, funny enough, I think it actually creates a culture of music appreciation — because there’s nothing else to do, so you end a song and people are there watching you. There’s no clanking bottles and loud, drunk shouting. It’s all very much about the band, so it’s a really great kind of a litmus test. These kids are totally paying attention to you, and if you can get them to move and dance and respond, you know you’re doing something right. If they’re just blankly staring at you, you know you have a problem. So, it’s actually kind of good that way.

SIMON: Tyler, haven’t you actually said that some of the LDS prohibitions against drinking and drugs might actually have helped your band?

GLENN: Ten thousand percent, in the beginning especially. To have a sober audience in front of you that is really engaged and responding, it really helped us gauge what songs were working and craft a good live show. It also gave us an opportunity to really build an avid fan base, instead of just casual bargoers liking the nightlife and also liking your music.

SIMON: I want to ask about a song from the new album, “Living in Another World.” Is there a story with this one?

GLENN: I say in the song, “I guess I’ve always been this way / It’s been hard for me to say,” which relates to me sorting out some of my identity issues: my sexuality and my religion and sort of how the two meet. I felt like I was living in a new world entirely, because it was like my happy place. And I think a lot of people do that, and a lot of people can relate. I think I’ve learned it’s OK to have those flaws, or things that don’t quite make sense.

SIMON: What’s the flaw? We all have them, but I hope that you’re not referring to your sexuality.

GLENN: Not at all. I think it’s OK to have things not make sense. Like, I think I’ve definitely received positivity, but are also those comments: “How can you say you’re Mormon and also gay?” And maybe that’s the thing that doesn’t make sense to people. But to me it makes sense to say, “I’m figuring it out.”

SIMON: Is it something you’d leave the church over, or is it something you’d hope to change the church with?

GLENN: More the latter. I mean, I’m not looking to disrespect anyone, but I think there’s already a little bit of a change on the horizon anyway, that slowly, the church has been more accepting. I also feel like the media has over-spun some things said within the church. Honestly, growing up and being actively Mormon, I was never told anything about homosexuality being wrong. But obviously, the Prop 8 situation is kind of when it started to become more public, and that’s kind of when I also started to question things, discover things about myself. I think it’s just been a natural thing, but as part of accepting who I am sexually, I also wanted to not throw away my faith. And I’m figuring out how the two align.

SIMON: Both of you were Mormon missionaries, I gather.

GLENN: Yeah.

SIMON: Tyler, you were in Nebraska for two years?

GLENN: I lucked out.

SIMON: Well, I’ve interviewed a lot of people who have been on Mormon missions over the years, and forgive me, I love Nebraska, but it’s usually some exotic place where you learn another language.

GLENN: All the band members when to more extravagant places, but I went to Omaha, and I only knew about Nebraska from the Bruce Springsteen record, honestly. I actually fell in love with it, so, it’s all been great now. But yeah, you’re opening the letter with your family filming you, and everyone’s crying, and I’m crying mostly because I’m going to Nebraska. So there’s that.

SIMON: Elaine, you were in Germany?

BRADLEY: Yeah, I served in Frankfurt. I learned how to speak German, which is a good thing, because later I went to college and met my future husband, and he’s from Germany.

SIMON: So you were away on mission for a few years. What happened to the music in that time?

BRADLEY: I think we both found ways to be musical within our own missions. Secular music definitely isn’t something that we’re encouraged to listen to or anything, but the leader of my mission allowed me to have a guitar, and he actually gave me a recorder to record songs so that he could listen to them. So I was able to keep playing music, basically every night when I got home, and write songs that way.

GLENN: I made three albums on my mission. I had a four-track tape recorder. I would make songs, and give them to the people I was teaching and ward members, and I sang at the conferences we had. I definitely made it known that I loved music, because that’s the language I knew how to speak.

SIMON: Do you think, in your mission work, you drew anybody across the line with your music?

GLENN: Yeah, I think music is a great meeting point for everyone, because everyone likes music and everyone feels music to a degree. I didn’t ever use it to persuade people, but I think that people can feel a certain spirit in music, and I think that helps.

SIMON: What’s going on in the song “Unavoidable?”

GLENN: A lot on this record, I try to really convey the anxiety of trying to find out who you are. An interesting topic that I’m going through is finding love in the modern age. There’s lots of technology, and lots of ways to communicate more than ever — but I feel like no one is communicating or everyone’s over-communicating. So I try to get that point across because it’s scary for me as a single, 30-year-old, now-out gay man, using technology.

SIMON: Do you mean things like text messages?

GLENN: There’s an app called Tinder, where you basically can use your geo services on your phone to see who’s near you and then look at their photos and see if you like them — which is kind of inherently odd, that it’s just window shopping at this point.

BRADLEY: It’s a meat market.

SIMON: Well, how do you feel about that?

GLENN: It’s a struggle, man. Being a closeted gay man in my 20s and using those apps, a lot of it is hookup based, and that’s not something I’m always about. It really doesn’t give you rewarding romance passionate relationships, and that’s what I’m seeking, ultimately.

SIMON: It’s none of my business, but I’m just moved to tell you, you sound like an awfully fine young man.

GLENN: Oh, I appreciate it. Thank you, that’s very nice.

BRADLEY: I vouch for him. He is a fine young man!

SIMON: With the advantage of 10 years’ hindsight, has music given you a way of working out your place in the world?

GLENN: Not at all. I think it’s OK to have things not make sense. Like, I think I’ve definitely received positivity, but are also those comments: “How can you say you’re Mormon and also gay?” And maybe that’s the thing that doesn’t make sense to people. But to me it makes sense to say, “I’m figuring it out.”

SIMON: Is it something you’d leave the church over, or is it something you’d hope to change the church with?

GLENN: More the latter. I mean, I’m not looking to disrespect anyone, but I think there’s already a little bit of a change on the horizon anyway, that slowly, the church has been more accepting. I also feel like the media has over-spun some things said within the church. Honestly, growing up and being actively Mormon, I was never told anything about homosexuality being wrong. But obviously, the Prop 8 situation is kind of when it started to become more public, and that’s kind of when I also started to question things, discover things about myself. I think it’s just been a natural thing, but as part of accepting who I am sexually, I also wanted to not throw away my faith. And I’m figuring out how the two align.

SIMON: Both of you were Mormon missionaries, I gather.

GLENN: Yeah.

SIMON: Tyler, you were in Nebraska for two years?

GLENN: I lucked out.

SIMON: Well, I’ve interviewed a lot of people who have been on Mormon missions over the years, and forgive me, I love Nebraska, but it’s usually some exotic place where you learn another language.

GLENN: All the band members when to more extravagant places, but I went to Omaha, and I only knew about Nebraska from the Bruce Springsteen record, honestly. I actually fell in love with it, so, it’s all been great now. But yeah, you’re opening the letter with your family filming you, and everyone’s crying, and I’m crying mostly because I’m going to Nebraska. So there’s that.

SIMON: Elaine, you were in Germany?

BRADLEY: Yeah, I served in Frankfurt. I learned how to speak German, which is a good thing, because later I went to college and met my future husband, and he’s from Germany.

SIMON: So you were away on mission for a few years. What happened to the music in that time?

BRADLEY: I think we both found ways to be musical within our own missions. Secular music definitely isn’t something that we’re encouraged to listen to or anything, but the leader of my mission allowed me to have a guitar, and he actually gave me a recorder to record songs so that he could listen to them. So I was able to keep playing music, basically every night when I got home, and write songs that way.

GLENN: I made three albums on my mission. I had a four-track tape recorder. I would make songs, and give them to the people I was teaching and ward members, and I sang at the conferences we had. I definitely made it known that I loved music, because that’s the language I knew how to speak.

SIMON: Do you think, in your mission work, you drew anybody across the line with your music?

GLENN: Yeah, I think music is a great meeting point for everyone, because everyone likes music and everyone feels music to a degree. I didn’t ever use it to persuade people, but I think that people can feel a certain spirit in music, and I think that helps.

SIMON: What’s going on in the song “Unavoidable?”

GLENN: A lot on this record, I try to really convey the anxiety of trying to find out who you are. An interesting topic that I’m going through is finding love in the modern age. There’s lots of technology, and lots of ways to communicate more than ever — but I feel like no one is communicating or everyone’s over-communicating. So I try to get that point across because it’s scary for me as a single, 30-year-old, now-out gay man, using technology.

SIMON: Do you mean things like text messages?

GLENN: There’s an app called Tinder, where you basically can use your geo services on your phone to see who’s near you and then look at their photos and see if you like them — which is kind of inherently odd, that it’s just window shopping at this point.

BRADLEY: It’s a meat market.

SIMON: Well, how do you feel about that?

GLENN: It’s a struggle, man. Being a closeted gay man in my 20s and using those apps, a lot of it is hookup based, and that’s not something I’m always about. It really doesn’t give you rewarding romance passionate relationships, and that’s what I’m seeking, ultimately.

SIMON: It’s none of my business, but I’m just moved to tell you, you sound like an awfully fine young man.

GLENN: Oh, I appreciate it. Thank you, that’s very nice.

BRADLEY: I vouch for him. He is a fine young man!

SIMON: With the advantage of 10 years’ hindsight, has music given you a way of working out your place in the world?