The National to start working on new album this fall

Matt Berninger of The National

Matt Berninger of The National

 

While the National are still on tour supporting their 2013 album Trouble Will Find Me, the band is setting their sights on making a new record. In an interview with Gigwise, frontman Matt Berninger revealed the band’s plans to get together in October to begin work on their seventh studio album, CoS informed.

For the first time, the band plans to to write together in the same room, as Berninger explained, “We always work on little things and email back and forth. We have no idea whether it’s going to work or not, but that’s as far as we’ve got with the new record: trying to work out a plan and a different approach.”

“That might fail miserably,” Berninger added, “but then we’ll try it a different way.”

Below, watch the band perform “Graceless” on Saturday Night Live earlier this year.

 

Kiev Regime Atrocities in East Ukraine: The Bombing of Slavyansk, “You kill women. You are killing children”. Video Evidence

 

The bombing of Slavyansk civilians in early June

“You kill women. You are killing children. You target civilians from the air with guided rockets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATO Allegations of Russian Tanks in Ukraine based on Fake Evidence

 

 

NATO is finally getting closer to their pretext for placing Ukraine under the West’s thumb. The Alliance’s Secretary General declared on Sunday that three tanks were shipped from Russia into Eastern Ukraine to abet the popular revolt against the West’s puppet regime in Kiev.

The accusation rests on a set of satellite images gathered from a commercial vendor based in Colorado and undated, anonymous YouTube videos that supposedly show tanks originating from a staging area in Southwest Russia rolling through the streets of Donetsk. The US State Department was quick to confirm the reports, and condemned the alleged actions as a grave escalation of the conflict.

However, although NATO has been waiting for months for an excuse to intervene in Ukraine and reignite the Cold War tensions that sustained the American military industrial complex for decades, the evidence of Moscow’s involvement is almost non-existent.

The first piece of evidence is a set of satellite images of a staging site in Russia from May 30and June 11. The site is largely inactive, but NATO officials claim that tanks moved into the area last Wednesday, before three were loaded onto a truck and left the area. By itself, this piece leaves independent observers begging for more.

First, the Russian army has been pulling back troops and supplies for weeks, so activity at a staging area is far from surprising. Second, NATO has a history of passing off old photographs as new evidence of Russian activity – look no further than the alliance’s attempt to pass off images from August 2013 as evidence that Putin was building up troops to invade East Ukraine last month

(see http://www.globalresearch.ca/nato-uses-old-images-taken-in-august-2013-to-claim-that-russian-troops-are-deployed-on-ukrainian-borders/5377530 ).

The second piece is even more laughable. There, officials scoured the Internet to find images of Russian tanks in city streets in a sorry attempt to make it seem as though the vehicles that left the staging site ended up in Ukraine. The unattributed YouTube videos and stills could easily have been doctored or filmed outside of Ukraine. Indeed, the world went crazy in April when the New York Times posted a photo of Russian soldiers who later appeared in Ukraine, only to retract it once the photographer admitted that the photo was taken in Russia

(see http://www.globalresearch.ca/us-propaganda-on-ukraine-new-york-times-retracts-russian-photo-scoop/5379111).

At every step, the evidence is wanting.

Much more likely, the tanks came from rebel raids of Ukrainian military arms depots in the East, like most of the weaponry used during the conflict. Alternately, Chechen militants have access to tanks, so they might have transported them from Chechnya along with the troves of fighters that have spilled into Ukraine to support the self-determination of the people in the East. These most recent accusations hearken back to the reports of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. NATO needs to stop searching for excuses to flex its military might. 

Alexander Flint is an energy security expert who has advised the US Congress on nuclear security issues. 

http://www.globalresearch.ca/nato-allegations-of-russian-tanks-in-ukraine-based-on-fake-evidence/5387160″ data-title=”NATO Allegations of Russian Tanks in Ukraine based on Fake Evidence”>

Articles by:Alexander Flint

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Disclaimer: The contents of this article are of sole responsibility of the author(s). The Centre for Research on Globalization will not be responsible for any inaccurate or incorrect statement in this article. The Center of Research on Globalization grants permission to cross-post original Global Research articles on community internet sites as long as the text & title are not modified. The source and the author’s copyright must be displayed. For publication of Global Research articles in print or other forms including commercial internet sites, contact: publications@globalresearch.ca

www.globalresearch.ca contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available to our readers under the provisions of “fair use” in an effort to advance a better understanding of political, economic and social issues. The material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving it for research and educational purposes. If you wish to use copyrighted material for purposes other than “fair use” you must request permission from the copyright owner.

For media inquiries: publications@globalresearch.ca

 

The Afghan Whigs, ‘Do To The Beast’

The Afghan Whigs

The Afghan Whigs

A lover’s obsessiveness may charm at first, but it can soon turn frightening. For an artist, the relentless pursuit of one object — a sound, a memory dragged up and reshaped, a fantasy that makes the long hours of work feel intimate — feeds creativity or freezes it. Greg Dulli has been chasing the same seductive nightmare since he was 22, when his band formed. Next year, he’ll turn 50. He’s spent a long time, in his mind, sitting in a darkened car in front of the same house.

Maybe that’s why the first Afghan Whigs album in 16 years starts with such a door slam. “Parked Outside” features a solid-steel riff powered by four guitarists, with Dulli’s old friend Clay Tarver (of ) adding a lead that’s like a key scratching through urethane. Any Afghan Whigs fan will be impressed by how the song refreshes Dulli’s big theme: sex that’s inseparable from need and greed and hate. “Allow me to illustrate how the hand becomes the fuse,” Dulli screams. And that scream, like all of Dulli’s vocalizing since he quit smoking several years back, is freer and more musical than the ones that made The Afghan Whigs’ music so cathartic in the ’90s. This is a sophisticated crash.

If “Parked Outside” serves to justify calling Do to the Beast an Afghan Whigs record, what unfolds afterward makes clear that for Dulli, the name is a frame more than a solid unit. Stalwart Whigs fans have already noted that because original guitarist Rick McCollum didn’t play on this album, it isn’t strictly a return; that’s true in the conventional sense. The absence of McCollum’s playing, based in harmonically driven guitar riffs and the use of pedals to induce sonic chemical burns, separates Do to the Beast from the band’s other six albums. In its glory, Afghan Whigs was a band of players locked in with each other. The anchoring presence of founding bassist John Curley, Dulli’s best pretentiousness detector, doesn’t make McCollum’s absence less notable.

But Afghan Whigs has also always been an idea, or really a vehicle for Dulli’s ideas about what rock, specifically, can say (and make listeners feel) about love, sex and loneliness. He’s both expanded upon and sometimes abandoned those ideas on his other main project, the loose conglomeration The Twilight Singers, which has always had a more down-tempo, electronic bent and a cinematic sense of space. (Dulli has used the phrase “shot on location” to credit the studios where he records for years.) He used the Twilight Singers approach to make Do to the Beast a big, de-centered thing — writing the music first to make sure it was a multilayered enough to let his stories breathe; inviting many guests, from Usher’s musical director Johnny “Natural” Najera to Emeralds auteur Mark McGuire and longtime pals like Joseph Arthur and Queens of the Stone Age’s Alain Johannes and Dave Catching — to augment the Whigs core, which was already expanded to a five-piece. (Drummer deserves special notice for finesse and whomp.) But its core depictions of erotic dread and reckoning are what The Afghan Whigs’ records have always been about.

Running with the album’s cinematic feel, Do to the Beast is in many ways Dulli’s . It conjures the 1990s in flashbacks, but its voices belong to men who’ve outlived the youth they had then. Dulli uses murder metaphors in “Matamoros” and “The Lottery,” and the supernatural enters into “Lost in the Woods” and “Royal Cream.” The real reason Do to the Beast resembles this year’s television preoccupation is that it gives us the voice and vision of a solitary, brilliant man in a constant tug-of-war with evil, as he imagines it — and as it still runs, though quieter now, in his veins. “My only cover was a con,” Dulli moans in the dusty ballad “I Am Fire.” He’s not undercover anymore.

The Afghan Whigs – Algiers [OFFICIAL VIDEO]

How to Dress Well – Face Again (Part 2 of 3 “What Is This Heart?” trilogy) (Official Video)

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How to Dress Well

“Face Again”

Weird World

 

 

 

Desperation’s always been at the heart of How to Dress Well’s music, but “Face Again”, the latest from HTDW’s forthcoming third LP, “What Is This Heart?”, quite literally sounds as if it’s gasping for air. After the beat clicks into place at the top of the track, the second sound you hear is a reedy, distortion-laden pulse, like the beep of a heart monitor or a high-in-the-chest wheeze of a machine-assisted breath. “Face Again,” with its talk of broken bones and bitten hands, finds a now-reeling Krell yearning for clarity. “I know I want an answer,” Krell confesses at one point, “but I forgot the question.”

The queasy, post-Yeezus lurch of “Face Again” perfectly mimics the encroaching dread and overwhelming anxieties Krell finds himself faced with. With writhing synths and 10,000 leagues of sub-bass behind him, Krell—his voice doubled, downshifted and faintly depraved-sounding—howls into the void: “Look me in the face again and tell me what I oughta be.” “Face Again” is a live-and-direct dispatch from the precise moment shock, stress and anguish make their way under the skin and lodge themselves in your chest.

Panda Bear – Panda Bear Meets the Grim Reaper

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Panda Bear – Panda Bear Meets the Grim Reaper, new album

due in July.

Noah Lennox (born July 17,1978) in Baltimore, Maryland), also known as Panda Bear, is an experimental musician and a founding member of Animal Collective, currently based in Lisbon, Portugal. His third album “Person Pitch” won best album of 2007 on many publications including Pitchfork.

Panda Bear has come a long way. From humble origins as a mere Animal Collective member Panda Bear has gone on to appeal to a vast (yet shrinking) audience of Giant Pandas. Since his breakthrough critical success of ‘Person Pitch’ in 2007, he’s been a bit slower with his output. ‘Tomboy’ out back in 2011 was a bit of a ‘grandfathered’ kind of release. Given ‘Best New Music’ felt a bit much for an album that built up the hype only to fall short.

His input for other artists tends to be the highlights. Most recently he had a high profile on the vaguely reputable French robot group of ‘Random Access Memories’. People seemed to enjoy his great work with Daft Punk, his weird vocals coming from the moon. Unfortunately down here on planet Earth he’s been a bit beaten down.

Animal Collective, his proverbial bread and butter, has fallen on hard times. Of course any band would after the tremendous success of ‘Merriweather Post Pavilion’. To keep ‘Merriweather Post Pavilion’ a true success Animal Collective avoided the big reveal that it was named after a place in Maryland. Only later on was it fully revealed. ‘Centipede Hz’ forced Animal Collective to reevaluate where they were going with their dorm room style.

Can ‘Panda Bear Meets the Grim Reaper’ capitalize on the prolific fear of death? Does it root for Panda Bear’s timely demise? Or is it just a name? Only time will tell. Hopefully time will tell something nice instead of a hard truth.

I’d love Noah to sit on the moon with the worlds largest microphone and every morning  serenade the entire world with this song: