The Libertines headline London’s Hyde Park

Libertines

Libertines

 

The Libertines paid tribute to the armed forces as they brought their London comeback gig to a close tonight (July 5).The band, who played two intimate warm-up shows at Glasgow’s Barrowlands venue last weekend (June 28, 29), finished their set with dual frontmen Carl Barat and Pete Doherty reciting Siegfried Sassoon’s 1918 poem, Suicide In The Trenches.
After the pair recounted the poem word for word, which they also recited at the NME Awards in 2004, Doherty addressed the audience, saying: “We remember and honour those who gave their lives for liberty. We thought it was nerve-wracking coming out here tonight but leaving Kings Cross station with a rifle across your back in 1914 must have been really hard.”Earlier, the band’s set had to be halted over concerns for the crowd’s safety. The four piece had opened with ‘Vertigo’ and were midway through second song ‘Boys In The Band’ when security came on stage and stopped the performance. Doherty motioned to the crowd to move back before telling them: “We can’t carry on if you don’t calm down a bit.”
The Libertines then restarted where they left off onlyto be halted again seconds later. Drummer Gary Powell came down to the front of the stage to tell the crowd to calm down before leading them ina chant of the riff to The White Stripes’ ‘Seven Nation Army’. Doherty then joined in with a run through of The Foundations’ ‘Build Me Up Buttercup’.Things eventually got moving again with ‘The Delaney’ and ‘Campaign Of Hate’. Doherty then dedicated ‘Time For Heroes’ to the Guildford Four’s GerryConlon, saying: “GerryConlon, if you’re looking down this afternoon” before tearing into the song.A rendition of ‘Music When The Lights Go Out’ was preceded by Doherty chanting “Albion-ey, Albion-ey, ole, ole, ole”. After the song Barat playfully leapfrogged over the guitarist. The duo later shared an embrace before debut album track ‘Death On The Stairs’.

Towards the end of the set things had to be halted once more as fans climbed the sound towers to get a better view of the show. Powell and bassist John Hassall had left the stage for Doherty and Barat to play a version of stripped-down song ‘France’. Barat scolded fans as the gig was further delayed, telling them: “If you don’t stop climbing the towers, Pigman [Doherty] can’t do his solo.” The song was never played completely because of the stoppage.

“I wanted to drive my camper van into the backstage area,” Doherty revealed shortly after. “The security guards said ‘you don’t want to do that because of the traffic’. I wanted to drive it in and put union jacks on top. They said ‘you’ve got nothing to fly the flag for’ and I said what about William Blake? What about Jock Scott? What about Johnny Marr? What about Carl Barat?” The band then played ‘Albion’, which saw Doherty shouting out Barat’s hometown of Basingstoke.

As the show came to a close, Doherty chanted once again over the microphone, this time singing “Libertine til I die/Libertine til I die/I know I am, I’m sure I am, Queen’s Park Rangers til I die.” They then brought the set to a riotous end with ‘I Get Along’ which concluded with Barat and Doherty jumping around hugging until they brought each other down to the floor.

As the four band members gathered in a line to salute their fans, Doherty initiated a burst of the hokey cokey while Powell told them: “You are all amazing and you are all Libertines.”

Earlier in the day, more issues had stopped some of the bands on the line-up from playing, including Swim Deep and Graham Coxon. Due to play in the Barclaycard Theatre, signs outside told fans the stage was closed due to a technical fault. North London quartet Wolf Alice were able to play on the same stage early in the afternoon, playing a similar set to that which they played at Glastonbury a week earlier. “Who’s excited to see The Libertines later?” asked guitarist Joff Oddie, with drummer Joel Amey adding: “What a day for friendship!” The group then launched into a version of their second single ‘Bros’, which followed the likes of ‘Blush’ and a cover of Chris Isaak’s ‘Wicked Games’. The band finished their set with debut single ‘Fluffy’, which concluded with bassist Theo Ellis jumping in the crowd.

Meanwhile, Spiritualized played a late afternoon set on the main stage, following Newcastle’s Maximo Park. Frontman J Spaceman sat on a chair on the right hand stage throughout, dressed all in white and playing a red guitar. He was joined by two backing singers, also dressed head-to-toe in-white, and his bandmates. The group played songs from across their back catalogue in front of visuals of black and white circles, such as ‘Hey Jane’ and ‘Sweet Talk’.

Irish band The Pogues followed them 45 minutes later and also had their set halted as a fan received medical attention. The stoppage came towards the end of the group’s performance, which had seen them play tracks like ‘Dirty Old Town’ and ‘Sally MacLennane’. “We’ll be back soon if it’s suitable to do so,” they told the crowd as singer Shane MacGowan puffed on a cigarette. They then returned for one more song before having to end their set.

Make sure you pick up next week’s issue of NME, out July 9 on newsstands and available digitally, for an exclusive interview with The Libertines talking about what the future holds for the band, plus the definitive verdict on their comeback shows.

The Libertines played:

‘Vertigo’
‘Boys In The Band’
‘The Delaney’
‘Campaign Of Hate’
‘Time For Heroes’
‘Horrorshow’
‘Begging’
‘The Ha Ha Wall’
‘Music When The Lights Go Out’
‘What Katy Did’
‘The Boy Looked At Johnny’
‘Can’t Stand Me Now’
‘Last Post On The Bugle’
‘Love On The Dole’
‘Death On The Stairs’
‘Radio America’
‘Don’t Look Back Into The Sun’
‘Tell The King’
‘Up The Bracket’
‘What A Waster’
‘France’
‘Albion’
‘I Get Along’

 

 

 

The Beatles in Mono

Beatles-in-mono-773

The Beatles

 

The Beatles in Mono is a box set compilation comprising the remastered monophonic recordings by The Beatles. The set was released on 9 September 2009, the same day the remastered stereo recordings and companion The Beatles Stereo Box Set were also released, along with The Beatles: Rock Band video game. The remastering project for both mono and stereo versions was led by EMI senior studio engineers Allan Rouse and Guy Massey. It was announced that the box set will be remastered (this time from the actual tapes and not the digital process) again on 180-gram heavyweight vinyl and it will be released on September 8, 2014.

The Mono Box Set was released to reflect the fact that the Beatles’ catalogue (aside from Abbey Road, Let It Be and Yellow Submarine) was originally released in mono, with the stereo versions as an addition. Many feel that these mono mixes reflect the true intention of the band. For example, in the case of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, all the mono mixes were done together with the Beatles themselves, throughout the recording of the album, whereas the stereo mixes were done in only six days by Abbey Road personnel George Martin, Geoff Emerick and Richard Lush after the album had been finished, with none of the Beatles attending. George Harrison commented:

At that time […] the console was about this big with four faders on it. And there was one speaker right in the middle […] and that was it. When they invented stereo, I remember thinking ‘Why? What do you want two speakers for?’, because it ruined the sound from our point of view. You know, we had everything coming out of one speaker; now it had to come out of two speakers. It sounded like … very … naked.”“The goal was simple: make them sound like the artist intended.”
Steve Berkowitz

The thirteen-disc collection contains the remastered mono versions of every Beatles album released in true mono. The original 1965 stereo mixes of Help! and Rubber Soul are included as bonuses on their respective albums. (In 1986 both albums had been remixed by George Martin for their CD release in 1987.) The box contains a new two-disc compilation album titled Mono Masters, which compiles all the mono mixes of singles, B-sides and EP tracks that did not originally appear on any of the United Kingdom albums or Magical Mystery Tour.

Universal and Apple’s first official unveiling of “The Beatles’ original mono studio albums on vinyl”. The more canny of you will realize that the Beatles’ original studio albums are already available on vinyl, but time and entropy hasn’t been kind to the versions released between 1963 and 1968. So, on September 8 (September 9 in the US), The Beatles’ nine UK albums, plus the American-compiled Magical Mystery Tour, and the Mono Masters collection of non-album tracks will be released in newly mastered mono versions on 180-gram vinyl LPs with lovingly replicated original artwork.

He places the specially designed Ortofon cartridge on the first track, Love Me Do. It sounds clear and beefy, but not falsely so. Instrumental fluffs and those plosive ‘p’s on “pretend” have been kept in. It’s like someone has polished the original 51-year-old pressing with the best record cleaner in the world. We hear ten tracks in full. Here are the Top 5.

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U.S. Box

U.S. Box

 

The last song, the mysteriously lovely Goodnight is played and some figures are rolled out before the next audience is ushered in. Before MOJO leaves it discovers that…

• The records will be manufactured at Optimal Media in Germany. They are planning on producing something in the region of 35-40,000 boxes.

• Those willing to immerse themselves in the complete mono experience can purchase a specially manufactured Ortofon 2M Mono Special Edition “Beatles Tribute” Cartridge. Although the LPs will sound “just fine” with an existing stereo cartridge.

• George Harrison was once ejected from New York’s Plaza Hotel for playing his McIntosh stereo too loud.

• If a meeting goes on too long at Abbey Road the Beatles track they choose to play to hurry everyone out is Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da.

• The Beatles On Mono is available to pre-order at http://www.thebeatles.com/news/beatles-get-back-mono

The Human Cost of the FIFA World Cup

By T. J. Petrowski
Global Research, July 05, 2014

Region: Latin America & Caribbean
Theme: Police State & Civil Rights, Poverty & Social Inequality

brazilAs the world watches the 2014 FIFA World Cup, people are protesting the cost and the human rights violations being committed by police and security forces to protect this corporate investment.

Working people in Brazil are understandably frustrated with the public cost of the World Cup, an estimated $14 billion. When compared to spending on social services, the cost of the World Cup is the equivalent of 61% of funding for education, or 30% of the funding for healthcare. Private companies, including those in the services and construction industries, will be the main beneficiaries of this public money. Adding to this cost is the forced evictions of the poor living in the favelas (slums) and the dispossession of indigenous people from their lands to build stadiums and parking lots. [1]

Over one million people in Brazil have protested the cost of the World Cup, the cutbacks and increased costs of social services, forced evictions, and other human rights violations.

The state security services have cracked down viciously on all anti‑FIFA demonstrations across the country. At least a dozen or more people have been killed and hundreds have been arrested. On the first day of the World Cup, 47 people were arrested, and police shot rubber bullets at medics helping the wounded. The state security services have been accused of killing of the poor and homeless, including children, to “clean up” the favelas prior to the start of the World Cup. To justify this violent response, the federal government has pushed to pass legislation that would criminalize all anti‑FIFA protests as “terrorism”, with 12 to 30 year prison sentences for those convicted. [2]

The state has deployed more than 200,000 troops, armed with such weapons as Israeli drones, German anti‑aircraft tanks, and rooftop missile defense systems, to protect the World Cup from protestors. The infamous American mercenary company, Blackwater, known for its role in the U.S. occupation of Iraq, is allegedly in Brazil helping with security for the World Cup.

The financial and social cost of events like the World Cup and the Olympics to working people are enormous.

During the London 2012 Olympics, 10,000 police officers and 13,000 troops, more than all British forces in Afghanistan, along with ships in the Thames, fighter jets, and surface‑to‑air missile defense systems, were deployed to protect the $11 billion event. At a time when 2 million are unemployed, 27% of children live in poverty, and austerity budgets are being forced on working people, $11 billion came at a significant cost to working people. [3]

The Sochi Winter Olympics cost a staggering $51 billion, even though 18 million Russians live in poverty and migrant workers were paid less than $2/hour to build the necessary infrastructure.

In 2022 Qatar will host the FIFA World Cup, and already hundreds of migrant workers have died working on the World Cup infrastructure. Over 400 Nepalese and 700 Indian workers have been have are already among the casualties. The conditions migrant workers are forced to work in have been compared to slavery. Robert Booth for the Guardian explains: “Workers described forced labour in 50C (122F) heat, employers who retain salaries for several months and passports making it impossible for them to leave and being denied free drinking water. The investigation found sickness is endemic among workers living in overcrowded and insanitary conditions and hunger has been reported. Thirty Nepalese construction workers took refuge in the their country’s embassy and subsequently left the country, after they claimed they received no pay.” The International Trade Union Confederation estimates that 12 workers will die each week and around 4,000 will have died before the event starts. [4]

The social and financial cost of these international corporate events should be fought by working people around the world at a time where millions are being forced into unemployment and are denied their basic needs, democracy is being eroded, the environment is being destroyed, and the threat of war is increasing.

Note

[1] http://www.forbes.com/sites/kenrapoza/2014/06/11/bringing-fifa-to-brazil-equal-to-roughly-61-of-education-budget/

[2] http://revolution-news.com/the-story-of-resistance-to-fifas-war-on-brazilian-people-video-blog/

[3] http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2012/mar/12/london-olympics-security-lockdown-london

[4] http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2013/sep/26/qatar-world-cup-migrant-workers-dead