Foo Fighters leave David Letterman in tears with emotional performance of “Miracle” — watch

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Wednesday night’s episode of the Late Show with David Letterman featured a full gamut of emotions, from funny to exciting to bittersweet.

Marking the third night of Foo Fighters’ week-long residency on the late-night show, Letterman first employed his musical guests for a quirky faux commercial for the law firm of Grohl, Hawkins, Mendel, Shiflett, Smear, & Associates.

Later, the band hit the stage for their latest all-star performance. This time, they were joined by swamp rock legend Tony Joe White for a stomping rendition of “Polk Salad Annie”. Letterman seemed especially tickled by the performance, remarking of White, “If I were this guy, you could kiss my ass.”

At the request of Letterman, Foo’s also performed one of their own songs for a special web exclusive video. Letterman introduced the band by discussing their relationship, “These gentlemen, we’ve known each other for a long long time now. They have crossed my path in ways unexpected and expected. And, as a result, each and every year they grow to mean more to me as human beings and talents musical artists.” He then relayed a story about taking his four-year-old son skiing, which the ski instructor caught on video and soundtracked with Foo Fighters’ song “Miracle”. “It’s the second song of theirs that will always have great great meaning to me for the rest of my life,” he explained. Following the performance, a teary eyed Letterman proclaimed, “You see what I mean? That’s pretty good!”

Earlier in the week, Foo Fighters teamed with Heart for a performance of “Kick It Out” and Zac Brown to cover Black Sabbath’s “War Pigs”. It all comes in support of the band’s new album, Sonic Highways, due November 10th via Roswell Records.

Hear Led Zeppelin’s Loose, Alternate Mix of ‘Rock and Roll’

English rock group Led Zeppelin performing at the Empire Pool, Wembley, London, 23rd November 1971. Left to right: Robert Plant, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page and John Bonham (1948 - 1980). (Photo by Michael Putland/Getty Images)

English rock group Led Zeppelin performing at the Empire Pool, Wembley, London, 23rd November 1971. Left to right: Robert Plant, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page and John Bonham (1948 – 1980). (Photo by Michael Putland/Getty

“As a song, it was actually kind of punky,” John Paul Jones says.

“It’s a lot of fun to play”

Later this month, Led Zeppelin will release deluxe reissues of 1971’s Led Zeppelin IV and 1973’s Houses Of The Holy. The latest installments of their year-long archival campaign, both were remastered by Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page and include a second disc of bonus, unreleased music.

Already we’ve heard a grittier version of Led Zeppelin IV‘s “Black Dog” and a stripped-down rendering of “The Rain Song” off Houses Of The Holy. Now, comes an alternate rendition of the Led Zeppelin IV track “Rock and Roll”. Here, a different mix of guitars evokes a somewhat softer, less dynamic tone. It doesn’t shift the song into a new direction per se, but this take certainly doesn’t wield the sweltering oomph of the final track we all know and love today.

Page spoke to Rolling Stone about the song’s undeniable exuberance, saying, “‘Rock and Roll’ has just got that cheeky energy about it. It’s a party. ‘It’s been a long time since I rock and rolled.’ It says it all, really. It’s great lyrics and it’s a great performance.”

Bassist John Paul Jones added, “As a song, it was actually kind of punky; pre-punk. It was really fast too, onstage anyway. It just got really quick, a lot of energy. It’s a lot of fun to play. The crowd loved it. We loved it.”

Listen in below.

Both reissues are due out on October 28th. The Led Zeppelin IV deluxe edition includes unreleased versions of every song appearing on the original album, including alternate mixes of “Misty Mountain Hop”, “Four Sticks”, “The Battle Of Evermore”, and “Stairway To Heaven”. Meanwhile, the companion disc for Houses Of The Holy includes rough and working mixes for “The Ocean” and “Dancing Days”, a guitar mix backing track for “Over The Hills And Far Away”, and a version of “The Rain Song” without piano.

Led Zeppelin IV Deluxe Reissue Tracklist:

Disc One:
01. Black Dog
02. Rock And Roll
03. The Battle of Evermore
04. Stairway To Heaven
05. Misty Mountain Hop
06. Four Sticks
07. Going To California
08. When The Levee Breaks

Disc Two:
01. Black Dog – Basic Track With Guitar Overdubs
02. Rock And Roll – Alternate Mix
03. The Battle Of Evermore – Mandolin/Guitar Mix From Headley Grange
04. Stairway To Heaven – Sunset Sound Mix
05. Misty Mountain Hop – Alternate Mix
06. Four Sticks – Alternate Mix
07. Going To California – Mandolin/Guitar Mix
08. When The Levee Breaks – Alternate UK Mix

Houses of the Holy Deluxe Reissue Tracklist:

Disc One:
01. The Song Remains The Same
02. The Rain Song
03. Over The Hills And Far Away
04. The Crunge
05. Dancing Days
06. D’yer Mak’er
07. No Quarter
08. The Ocean

Disc Two:
01. The Song Remains The Same – Guitar Overdub Reference Mix
02. The Rain Song – Mix Minus Piano
03. Over The Hills And Far Away – Guitar Mix Backing Track
04. The Crunge – Rough Mix – Keys Up
05. Dancing Days – Rough Mix With Vocal
06. No Quarter – Rough Mix With JPJ Keyboard Overdubs – No Vocal
07. The Ocean – Working Mix

Sixteen People Die Falling Through Grate at South Korea Concert

Rescue workers stand around a collapsed ventilation area at a K-Pop Concert in Seongnam, South Korea on October 17th, 2014. Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/sixteen-people-die-falling-through-grate-at-south-korea-concert-20141017#ixzz3GRCSZtHJ Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

Rescue workers stand around a collapsed ventilation area at a K-Pop Concert inSeongnam, South Korea on October 17th, 2014.  Photo: Getty 

At least 16 South Korean music fans plummeted more than 65 feet to their deaths at an outdoor K-pop concert by the group 4Minute on Friday when a ventilation grate collapsed. The grate, which the victims had been standing on, had covered a concrete shaft that led to an underground garage. Eleven others were seriously injured in the accident, according to The Associated Press, which cites information from an official in Seongnam, a city to the south of Seoul. The BBC reports that the number of those killed and injured by the collapse could rise as investigations continue.

“Twelve peoplewere killed at the scene, two others died while theywere being rushed to the hospital,” the BBC reported a local fire official as saying, via South Korea’sYonhap news agency. “Othersare assumed to have passed away while receiving medical treatment.”

The victims have not been identified, but AP reports that YTN television network suggested that the concertgoers were mainly female students. About 700 people were in attendance at the concert, which was part of a local festival being held at what the BBC described as “a multi-purpose complex for technology firms.”

Fan-shot video from the concert showed 4Minute continuing with their concert, unaware of the disaster.

The grate itself was elevated to shoulder height for most concertgoers. The fans had likely climbed atop it to get a better view of the stage. The hole left by the grate appeared to be 10 to 14 feet square, according to AP. The cause of the collapse is not yet known.

“There was a sudden, loud screaming, and when I turned it looked as if people were being sucked down into a hole,” a concertgoer told YTN, according to the BBC.

U.N. Chief Offers Stark View of Gaza Devastation

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JERUSALEM — Visiting Gaza on Tuesday for the first time since this summer’s 50-day war between Israel and Hamas, the secretary general of the United Nations, Ban Ki-moon, said the destruction was “beyond description,” even as reconstruction efforts were underway for the first time.

“No amount of Security Council sessions, reports or briefings could have prepared me for what I witnessed today,” Mr. Ban told reporters after touring some of the most badly damaged areas of the Gaza Strip and visiting a United Nations school that was shelled during the fighting.

Perhaps anticipating the secretary general’s harsh assessment, Israel on Tuesday allowed a first delivery of building materials across the border into Gaza in a move to signal its support for the reconstruction effort and to deflect international criticism.

But that did little to soften Mr. Ban’s critique. “The build-destroy, build-destroy cycle must be broken,” he said. “The mindless pattern of blockade, rockets and destruction must stop.”

Mr. Ban’s visit to Israel, the West Bank and Gaza, came after an international donor conference in Cairo on Sunday garnered $5.4 billion in pledges for the rehabilitation of the tiny coastal enclave, which has a population of some 1.8 million. Palestinian officials said that half the funds would be used for rebuilding while the other half would provide budgetary support for Gaza for the next three years.

United Nations officials said they were also encouraged by the symbolic first meeting in Gaza last week of the Palestinian government of national consensus that was formed in June with the backing of the West Bank-based Palestinian Authority and its rival Hamas, which had previously maintained a monopoly of power.

But the continuation of the reconstruction effort will largely hinge on a United Nations-brokered mechanism to monitor and supervise the process — a tracking system meant to balance between the urgent need for relief in Gaza and Israel’s demand for assurances that the building materials will not end up used by Hamas to rebuild its military infrastructure.

“For this to be successful there needs to be full calm — no rebuilding of tunnels or rockets,” Robert H. Serry, the United Nations special envoy for the Middle East peace process, said in a telephone interview.

The Gaza recovery plan drawn up by the Palestinian government states that 2.5 million tons of rubble must be removed and that 60,000 homes were damaged in the war. Of those, it said, 20,000 were severely damaged or completely destroyed.

The shipment Tuesday of building materials included 600 tons of cement, 50 trucks of aggregates and 10 trucks of metal, according to the office of the Israeli defense ministry that coordinates civilian activities in the Palestinian territories. It described the transfer as a “pilot” presumably meant to test the mechanism for monitoring the reconstruction, which is still in its early stages.

The system for ensuring it was all properly used, agreed upon by the United Nations, the Palestinian Authority and Israel last month, involved running a central database for tracking the ordering and delivery of materials.

 

Once in Gaza, the materials would be transferred to private sector vendors approved by the Palestinian Authority. Contractors and engineers would also have to be licensed by the authority. The United Nations will contract local engineers to carry out spot-checks of some projects.

Nazmi Muhana, the Palestinian Authority’s director of crossing points, described the conditions for shipping the building materials as “strict and complicated.” Speaking by telephone from Ramallah in the West Bank he said the materials had to be stored in warehouses equipped with cameras and protected by guards. Since the Palestinian Authority has no forces on the ground in Gaza, Mr. Muhana said, the authority has handed responsibility for the materials to the United Nations.

Israeli officials have refused to discuss the details publicly; one said exposure would only lead people with an interest to look for and exploit the loopholes.

Sami Abu Zuhri, a spokesman for Hamas in Gaza, said Hamas would have nothing to do with the deliveries of building materials. “This is a Palestinian Authority-United Nations business,” he said. “They have to stop seeking pretexts obstructing the delivery of materials in sufficient amounts.”

The sole goods crossing now in use between Israel and Gaza has the capacity for 400 to 450 trucks per day, according to Israeli officials, and already transfers about 300 to 350 trucks a day of consumer goods. Eventually, when the reconstruction effort is at its peak, the capacity will need to grow to accommodate 700 to 900 trucks a day.

Since Hamas took over the territory in 2007 Israel and Egypt have tightened the restrictions on the movement of people and goods across their borders with Gaza. Critics of the new mechanism for reconstruction say it falls far short of the lifting of the blockade, a condition they say is necessary for Gaza’s recovery.

Israel has shown willingness to ease the blockade after reaching a cease-fire with Hamas in late August. Israel announced on Tuesday that it would allow the export of agricultural produce from Gaza to the West Bank in the coming weeks, beginning with about 15 tons of dates and sweet potatoes and expanding over time to apply to other products, including fish.

But for a full lifting of the closure, Mr. Serry said, “You need more. You need peace.”

Back in Israel, Mr. Ban visited Nirim, an Israeli community just across the border from Gaza where two residents were killed by Palestinian mortar fire in the final hours of the war. He met the grandparents of a 4-year-old Israeli boy who was killed in another mortar attack on a nearby community and was taken by Israeli army officers into one of the tunnels built by Hamas to infiltrate Israeli territory.

That was meant as a poignant reminder of Israel’s security concerns and its fears that Hamas, the Islamic militant group that dominates the Palestinian enclave, would try to divert funds and materials meant for reconstruction to replenish its rocket stocks and rebuild the destroyed tunnels.

Catalunya Cancels Vote to Secede From Spain, but Calls for Nonbinding Ballot

Students protested in Barcelona last week after Spain's Constitutional Court issued a ruling that prevented Catalonia from holding an independence referendum on Nov. 9. Lluis Gene/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Students protested in Barcelona last week after Spain’s Constitutional Court issued a ruling that prevented Catalonia from holding an independence referendum on Nov. 9. Lluis Gene/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

 

The Times

In his latest act of defiance toward Madrid, Artur Mas, the Catalan leader, called off his push for a secession vote next month but announced that the regional Catalan government would instead urge its citizens to take part in a looser, nonbinding consultation on the same date. He added that his government had the right to organize such an expression of popular will and that doing so would not violate Spanish law.

“We have sufficient strength to do what we said we would do, which is to consult the people of Catalonia,” Mr. Mas said at a televised news conference. “There will be ballot boxes and papers” on Nov. 9, he added.

Catalans in Barcelona were among hundreds of thousands in a human chain on Wednesday to show support for separating from Spain.

His alternative plan is less likely to push Spain into a constitutional crisis, even if it creates, at least for now, further political and legal uncertainty and continues to be opposed by the central government of Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy. An informal ballot would also struggle to receive the international legitimacy that Mr. Mas had hoped to achieve with a vote.

In the coming weeks, Mr. Mas also faces a significant challenge in keeping other pro-independence parties aligned with his governing Convergence party. “We continue to go forward, but at the moment not as united as 10 days ago,” he said.

Mr. Mas, a late but staunch convert to secessionism, has been trying to lead Catalonia toward independence without being held responsible for provoking an unprecedented crisis for Spain. Catalonia, Spain’s economic powerhouse, has been pushing for a vote on secession that the central government has vowed to block. Mr. Rajoy is also counting on the support of Spain’s Constitutional Court.

Mr. Mas and Mr. Rajoy have been at loggerheads for two years, initially over fiscal issues. However, tensions came to the fore late last month, when Mr. Mas signed a decree approving the Nov. 9 vote. Mr. Mas contends that his position had been made untenable by Mr. Rajoy’s refusal to talk, even after Scotland rejected independence from Britain in a referendum in September.

Mr. Rajoy’s government has steadfastly refused to allow Catalans to vote on independence and, if anything, has been emboldened by the failure of the Scottish push for secession.

Earlier on Tuesday, Mr. Rajoy described the cancellation of the Catalan vote as “excellent news.” He said at an economic conference in Madrid that “Spain is a democracy and an advanced country, and to comply with the law is an obligation for everybody.”

But Mr. Mas later sought to dampen Mr. Rajoy’s celebration.

“There are people who say they have excellent news, but excellent news sometimes lasts only a few hours,” Mr. Mas said. He added that his government had “competencies in terms of consultation” of its citizens, without specifying how his latest plan could be deemed legal by Spanish courts.

Mr. Mas must now hope a nonbinding referendum can generate sufficient popular enthusiasm amid discord among the main secessionist parties and without legal guarantees from the government of Spain.

However, the possibility that Mr. Mas will instead eventually switch to a longer-term strategy to achieve an independent Catalonia, by calling for new elections for the regional Parliament, raises the prospect that Mr. Rajoy will end up facing a Catalan Parliament controlled by more hard-line secessionist politicians than Mr. Mas.

Mr. Mas changed tack on Tuesday after a long, tense meeting with other secessionist politicians on Monday, during which he failed to gain their support for his latest consultation plan. After that meeting, Esquerra Republicana de Catalunya, a left-wing secessionist party that has the second-largest representation in Catalonia’s Parliament, issued a statement suggesting that it wanted new elections to move swiftly toward a unilateral declaration of independence.

“I don’t consider what happened yesterday as the burial of the consensus in Catalonia,” Mr. Mas said. “The real adversary isn’t within Catalonia, but it is the Spanish state, which is doing everything possible to deny us the right to vote.”

Mr. Mas was also forced to forget his voting decree after the Constitutional Court recently ordered the suspension of the Catalan voting campaign pending a final ruling on its legality. The court could take as long as five months to rule.

Still, Mr. Mas insisted that the vote on Nov. 9 would look similar to what had initially been planned, organized with the help of more than 20,000 volunteers, held in polling stations across Catalonia and with the backing of 920 town halls that recently voted in favor of a secession ballot in November.

On Tuesday, Mr. Rajoy suggested that he would be willing to reopen talks with Mr. Mas, if his voting plan was shelved. “We need to dialogue and speak,” Mr. Rajoy said.

Mr. Mas has fanned expectations for independence among Catalans since a falling out with Madrid in 2012, after Mr. Rajoy rejected a Catalan request to reduce its contribution to a Spanish system that redistributes tax revenues from richer to poorer regions.

The fiscal dispute coincided with hundreds of thousands filling downtown Barcelona on Catalonia’s national day to push for independence. Catalonia has 7.5 million people, 16 percent of Spain’s population, and it accounts for 19 percent of the nation’s output.

Fighting Continues – Donetsk in Ruins

Ukrainian soldiers detain a man, center, "suspected" of spying for pro-Russian militants at a checkpoint near Debaltseve, in Ukraine’s Donetsk region. Ukraine's crisis entered dangerous new territory with Kiev claiming its forces destroyed a Russian military convoy, while the United States warned Moscow over its "provocative" efforts at destabilisation. Anatolii Stepanov/AFP via Getty Images

Ukrainian soldiers detain a man, center, “suspected” of spying for pro-Russian militants at a checkpoint near Debaltseve, in Ukraine’s Donetsk region. Ukraine’s crisis entered dangerous new territory with Kiev claiming its forces destroyed a Russian military convoy, while the United States warned Moscow over its “provocative” efforts at destabilisation. Anatolii Stepanov/AFP via Getty Images

As living conditions worsen near the rebel-held city of Donetsk, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko says he would accept humanitarian aid.

RelativesOfUkrainianSoldiersReleased

Aug. 15, 2014 Relatives meet with 25 Ukrainian servicemen who had been released from captivity in the Donetsk region during a meeting in Kiev. Shelling killed 11 civilians and wounded eight more over the past 24 hours in the besieged rebel stronghold of Donetsk in eastern Ukraine, local authorities said Friday. Mykhaylo Markiv/Presidential Press-Service via AFP/Getty Images

 

Breaking news Poroshenko: Ukraine, Russia fail to reach agreement on gas dispute

‘Difficult, full of disagreements’: No breakthrough in Milan talks on Ukraine crisis

(L to R) France's President Francois Hollande, Russia's President Vladimir Putin, Italy's Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko sit during a meeting on the sidelines of a Europe-Asia summit (ASEM) in Milan October 17, 2014. (Reuters/Daniel Dal Zennaro)

(L to R) France’s President Francois Hollande, Russia’s President Vladimir Putin, Italy’s Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, Ukraine’s President Petro Poroshenko sit during a meeting on the sidelines of a Europe-Asia summit (ASEM) in Milan October 17, 2014. (Reuters/Daniel Dal Zennaro)

RT news

Published: October 17, 2014

The talks on the Ukrainian crisis, where the presidents of Russia and Ukraine have met with their European counterparts, have resulted in “no breakthrough,” according to Chancellor Merkel, but were still labeled “positive” by most participants.

The presidents of Russia and Ukraine met on Friday morning in Milan on the sidelines of the summit of Asian and European leaders in Italy. They were joined by German Chancellor Angela Merkel, French President Francois Hollande, British Prime Minister David Cameron and European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso.

I cannot see a breakthrough here at all so far,” Merkel said after the meeting, according to Reuters.

We will continue to talk,” she added. “There was progress on some details, but the main issue is continued violations of the territorial integrity of Ukraine.”  – Ms Merkel’s favorite song lyrics.

A political solution to the conflict in Ukraine has not yet been found, President of the European Council Herman Van Rompuy commented on the talks and urged both Russia and Ukraine to follow through on the peace agreement reached in Minsk, Belarus at the beginning of September.

What we agreed was the protocol of Minsk on the ceasefire, and the peace plan is of crucial importance,” Rompuy said. “We have to implement this. This would guarantee again a future for Ukraine. So implementation, implementation, implementation — those are the key words.”

 

 

Russia’s President Vladimir Putin has so far been laconic in his assessment of the talks’ outcome.

It was good, it was positive,” the smiling president told reporters after the event, Reuters reported.

It was Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, who eventually elaborated on the negotiations, describing them as “difficult” ones.

The negotiations are really difficult, full of disagreements, full of misunderstandings,” Peskov said. “Nevertheless they are still taking place. There’s an exchange of opinions.

The participants have discussed in detail the implementation of the Minsk agreements,” Peskov said.

Unfortunately, some of the breakfast participants demonstrated their complete reluctance to understand the real situation in the southeast of Ukraine.”

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko complained to Austria’s chancellor Werner Faymann later in the day, that the morning talks did not leave him hopeful about achieving a breakthrough in the crisis.

Unfortunately, I am not very optimistic,” Reuters cited Poroshenko as saying.

(L to R) Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko, EU Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron talk during a meeting on the sidelines of a Europe-Asia summit (ASEM) in Milan October 17, 2014. REUTERS/Daniel Dal Zennaro/Pool (ITALY - Tags: POLITICS) - RTR4AJ1R

(L to R) Ukraine’s President Petro Poroshenko, EU Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron talk during a meeting on the sidelines of a Europe-Asia summit (ASEM) in Milan October 17, 2014. REUTERS/Daniel Dal Zennaro/Pool (ITALY – Tags: POLITICS) – RTR4AJ1R

Other European leaders, who participated in the talks, seemed to be more encouraged by their outcome. “Positive” has been the most frequently used definition.

Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, who hosted the meeting said he was “really positive” after it, although he also acknowledged “a lot of differences” remained.

It was a very positive meeting,” said British Prime Minister David Cameron, according to AFP. “Vladimir Putin said very clearly that he doesn’t want a frozen conflict and he doesn’t want a divided Ukraine.”

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Ukraine’s President Petro Poroshenko had one more meeting later in the day trying to resolve the crisis. This time they were only accompanied by German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francois Hollande.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Ukraine’s President Petro Poroshenko had one more meeting later in the day in an effort to resolve the crisis.

Putin was once again concise, commenting on the outcome.

The results of the talks are good,” he told journalists when he left the negotiations room, TASS reported.

Petro Poroshenko announced that the meeting had resulted in a preliminary agreement on Russian gas supplies to Ukraine.