Foo Fighters leave David Letterman in tears with emotional performance of “Miracle” — watch

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Wednesday night’s episode of the Late Show with David Letterman featured a full gamut of emotions, from funny to exciting to bittersweet.

Marking the third night of Foo Fighters’ week-long residency on the late-night show, Letterman first employed his musical guests for a quirky faux commercial for the law firm of Grohl, Hawkins, Mendel, Shiflett, Smear, & Associates.

Later, the band hit the stage for their latest all-star performance. This time, they were joined by swamp rock legend Tony Joe White for a stomping rendition of “Polk Salad Annie”. Letterman seemed especially tickled by the performance, remarking of White, “If I were this guy, you could kiss my ass.”

At the request of Letterman, Foo’s also performed one of their own songs for a special web exclusive video. Letterman introduced the band by discussing their relationship, “These gentlemen, we’ve known each other for a long long time now. They have crossed my path in ways unexpected and expected. And, as a result, each and every year they grow to mean more to me as human beings and talents musical artists.” He then relayed a story about taking his four-year-old son skiing, which the ski instructor caught on video and soundtracked with Foo Fighters’ song “Miracle”. “It’s the second song of theirs that will always have great great meaning to me for the rest of my life,” he explained. Following the performance, a teary eyed Letterman proclaimed, “You see what I mean? That’s pretty good!”

Earlier in the week, Foo Fighters teamed with Heart for a performance of “Kick It Out” and Zac Brown to cover Black Sabbath’s “War Pigs”. It all comes in support of the band’s new album, Sonic Highways, due November 10th via Roswell Records.

Foo Fighters performed a secret show as The Holy Shits in an abandoned train tunnel

Foo Fighters - London

Foo Fighters – London

Foo Fighters were at it again Thursday night, performing another secret show in the UK ahead of their gig at the closing ceremony of the Invictus Games. Once again, the band appeared under the-holy-shit-that’s-awesome moniker, The Holy Shits. And while there was no Foo Fighters cover band to speak of, they did play in an abandoned train tunnel underneath London’s Waterloo Station.

In front of a crowd of 600 lucky fans, the Foos ripped through a 21-song set comprised mostly of their numerous greatest hits. There were a few exceptions, however: “Weenie Beenie”, off the band’s 1995 self-titled debut, was performed live for the first time since 2009. “For All The Cows” also made a rare live appearance.

Check out a few photos and videos, along with the full setlist, below.

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Setlist:
White Limo
Arlandria
Generator
Rope
See You
New Way Home
The Pretender
Learn to Fly
My Hero
Cold Day in the Sun
All My Life
Skin and Bones
Monkey Wrench
Hey, Johnny Park!
For All the Cows
Breakout
Weenie Beenie
This Is a Call

Encore:
Times Like These
Best of You
Everlong

Stream: The Birds of Satan’s debut album, featuring Dave Grohl

The Birds of Satan Album

The Birds of Satan Album

 

The Birds of Satan, the side-project of Foo Fighters drummer Taylor Hawkins, will let loose its self-titled debut album on April 15th through Shanabelle Records. In anticipation, the LP is streaming in its entirety below.

Comprised of Hawkins, Mick Murphy and Wiley Hodgen, of Hawkins’ Chevy Metal cover band, The Birds of Satan marks the trio’s first official release since launching earlier this year. The album was recorded over the course of one week at Dave Grohl’s Studio 606 in California and boasts appearances by Grohl, fellow Foo Pat Smear, Butch Vig, and Yes frontman Jon Davison.

[The Birds of Satan] is just all real old school rock with all sorts of little flares and touches,” Hawkins recently told Billboard. “It’s like a love letter to the music I love, a nod to everything, a homage sometimes. You’ll hear the (Rolling) Stones song that we learned last week and the Move song, or you’ll hear the Van Halen song or the James Gang song or whatever, but in our own songs.”

 

 

The Birds of Satan, the side-project of Foo Fighters drummer Taylor Hawkins, will let loose its self-titled debut album on April 15th through Shanabelle Records. In anticipation, the LP is streaming in its entirety below.Comprised of Hawkins, Mick Murphy and Wiley Hodgen, of Hawkins’ Chevy Metal cover band, The Birds of Satan marks the trio’s first official release since launching earlier this year. The album was recorded over the course of one week at Dave Grohl’s Studio 606 in California and boasts appearances by Grohl, fellow Foo Pat Smear, Butch Vig, and Yes frontman Jon Davison.

[The Birds of Satan] is just all real old school rock with all sorts of little flares and touches,” Hawkins recently told Billboard. “It’s like a love letter to the music I love, a nod to everything, a homage sometimes. You’ll hear the (Rolling) Stones song that we learned last week and the Move song, or you’ll hear the VanHalen song or the James Gang song or whatever, but in our own songs.” 

Pre-orders for the album are ongoing.

The Birds of Satan Tracklist:
01. The Ballad of the Birds of Satan
02. Thanks for the Line
03. Pieces Of The Puzzle
04. Raspberries
05. Nothing at All
06. Wait Til Tomorrow
07. Too Far Gone to See

Awesome Performance by Foo Fighters for Super Bowl Week Bash

David Growl of Foo Fighters

David Growl of Foo Fighters

 
“As far as I’m concerned, this is fucking half-time right here,” Grohl said.
 
Foo Fighters knew they were playing for a broader audience than usual at their Bud Light-sponsored Super Bowl week gig last night in midtown Manhattan, so, late in their set, Dave Grohl gave the crowd a lesson in Foo history. “Years ago, I was in this band and while I was in this band I wrote a bunch of songs and made a bunch of recordings in my basement. . . . [Then] I wasn’t in the band anymore, so I decided to do what I learned in Seattle – we started a band, bought a Dodge Van and played clubs. And that was 20 years ago.”
 
He began strumming 1995’s “Big Me,” delivering the endearing melody alone until the band joined in. The Foos then shifted into their more recent single “Walk,” with Taylor Hawkins pummeling explosive, dynamic rhythm as Grohl howled the arena-size choruses. The two songs proved just how far the Foos have come in the last 20 years, from opening for Mike Watt to selling out Madison Square Garden. “I wrote this song as a joke,” Grohl said before “Big Me.” “It’s not a joke anymore.”
 
As Grohl pointed out, the show was only the band’s third gig in the last year and a half. Set on a 1,500-capacity airplane hangar tent outside the old WWII aircraft carrier the Intrepid, it was a massive operation. Four thousand contest winners and corporate partners stayed onboard the ship; last night, concertgoers packed the multiple open bars while servers readily passed out hors d’oeuvres. (Openers the Zac Brown Band likely kept the barbecue for themselves backstage.)
 

It may have been an off-cycle gig for the Foos, but the minute they hit the stage with the thunderous “All My Life,” it was clear they weren’t holding back. Pat Smear grinned away, his guitar slung lower than ever while Taylor Hawkins created fireworks from his drum kit, looking like he just strolled in from the Santa Monica Pier. Grohl said being back onstage “makes me remember I have the greatest fucking job in the world.” Aside from perhaps Grohl’s buddy Paul McCartney, no one seems to approach the role of rock star with more palpable joy than Grohl. Toward the end of the night, he grabbed and sipped from someone’s Bud Light bottle and mugged with a thumbs up a la the “Big Me” video – a move few others could pull off. “As far as I’m concerned, this is fucking half-time right here,” Grohl said.
 
It really could have been, as Grohl ran, screamed and head banged throughout the tense, jagged grooves of “Rope” and “The Pretender.” One highlight was “Generator,” off the band’s most underrated album, There Is Nothing Left to Lose, whereGrohl rested his foot on the monitor, face down, concentrating on the winding riff. He seemed hypnotized by an extra-long “Monkey Wrench,” which broke down into a series of blues licks until he finally howled the song’s epic bridge.
 
At one point, “This is a Call” also turned into a funky roadhouse boogie –”That’s the Black Keys version,” Grohl joked – before the band broke into a steamrolling take on Pink Floyd’s “In the Flesh.” Before he left, Grohl acknowledged that he knew some fans were hoping to hear songs from the band’s next album : “I wish I could play you our whole new record,” he said. “But I can’t. It’s a surprise.”

Foo Fighters Are Coming Back with New Album, Says Guitarist

Chris Shiflett

Chris Shiflett

The band is rehearsing for new album says guitarist. Chris Shiflett’s honky-tonk side project takes a back sear as hiatus ends early.

 

Via Rolling Stone

Midway through a cover of the Buck Owens tune “King of Fools,” Chris Shiflett glimpses at an audience member watching television near the bar. When the song is over, he points to a TV facing the stage and yells, “Holy shit – is that Shark Week?” After a chuckle from the crowd, he adds, “How can we compete with that? I don’t even want to pay attention to us!”

Clearly, this is not Wembley Stadium, where Shiflett’s other band, the Foo Fighters, rocked out before 86,000 people in London a few years ago. This is SLO Brew, a college bar in San Luis Obispo, CA, where, on a night when Cal Poly students are still on summer break, about 60 people have showed up to see Shiflett’s side project, Chris Shiflett and the Dead Peasants, crunch out several honky-tonk country tunes.

“Nobody really knows who we are,” Shiflett admitted to Rolling Stone a couple of hours before the show. “And I feel if 20 people come, they almost look at me and go, ‘Awwwww.'”

But unlike Wang Chung, who appeared here the previous night, Shiflett’s days of playing club gigs are numbered.

“We actually just started making a new Foo Fighters record within the last few weeks,” said the band’s lead guitarist. “We’ve started rehearsing.”

When frontman Dave Grohl announced last October that the band was going on hiatus – “I’m not sure when the Foo Fighters are going to play again,” he wrote on Facebook – many thought the band was finished.

“I knew we weren’t done, but I just thought it’d be a little longer,” Shiflett said. “But whatever – it’s good. It’s good getting back to work.”

Still, when the Foo Fighters last performed – a year ago, with Grohl declaring the band wouldn‘t play again “for a long time” – Shiflett quickly returned to a side project he’d formed in 2010. While his debut with that band featured alt-country originals, this time Shiflett found himself veering toward more traditional country.

“I was out on the road, and I’d listen to old honky-tonk country all the time,” Shiflett said before his show, eating pita bread and carrots on the venue’s second floor. (His band, buddies from his native Santa Barbara, sat at a table nearby.) “I never played it, but I was like, ‘We should go immerse ourselves in that music and just live in that for a while. Just learn a bunch of old honky-tonk songs we love, go play some shows, and kind of do that for a while. I feel like the only way for me to internalize something is to do it a bunch.”

Shiflett has had side projects before, but they were punk bands, such as Jackson United and Me First and the Gimme Gimmes. Still, punk and honky-tonk do have a history, particularly in Southern California, where Dwight Yoakam played to punk crowds during his formative years.

“Honky-tonk and punk rock to me are kind of kindred spirits,” said Shiflett, who played in the band No Use for a Name before he joined the Foo Fighters. “You can’t quite put a finger on it. Maybe it’s just sort of a fuck-you attitude. It’s that rebellious streak.”

Soon after Shiflett and his band began performing the honky-tonk tunes, they decided to record some. The result is All Hat and No Cattle, a new album of covers by artists like Owens, Merle Haggard and Waylon Jennings.

While most of the songs channel the Bakersfield Sound popularized by California country acts dating back to the Fifties, there’s no twang in Shiflett’s vocals and no tear-in-my-beer sadness He does dress the part: shortly before the show, he ditched a Rolling Stones T-shirt in favor of a long-sleeve button-up shirt and cowboy hat. And while he has quickly mastered the country licks on guitar, his up-tempo covers feature a sly rock edge, evident in his version of Jennings’ tune “Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way?,” a two-chord song that Shiflett ended with a rollicking jam, complete with Stax-style horns.

While he grew up listening to bands like Aerosmith and the Stones – his first gig was performing Kiss songs at a high school talent show – he has developed a fondness for country guitarists.

“I think this is almost just an extended exercise in guitar playing for me,” he said. “Because I love country pickers.”

Finding himself on a roll, Shiflett had planned to release another album of originals with the Peasants, until that other band came calling.

“It was a very short hiatus,” he said with a smile. “We’re going to start recording the new Foo Fighter record at the beginning of next year.”

Don’t expect his country foray to influence that album much, though Shiflett joked that he might try to get a banjo part in there somewhere. “I’ll see if I can slip one in on the next album when no one’s looking,” he joked. “Dave will go, ‘Who put that fucking banjo on there?'”