Francesco Tristano – The bachCage album

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FRANCESCO TRISTANO / bachCage (english version)

Francesco Tristano
bachCage
Deutsche Grammophon / Universal
Release date: March 2011

The differences between Johann Sebastian Bach and John Cage are obvious. They are so obvious that you could be tempted to think that Tristano consciously decided on a high-contrast album programme. Which is certainly true to an extent. Only in the case of bachCage, the artist wasn’t out for provocation just for the sake of it. In fact, this album begins to unfold only at the second and third glance. In the foreground is Tristano’s idiosyncratic and very personal handling of his musical pioneers, Bach and Cage. In all of his precise interpretation of Bach, the music is very much alive and sounds conspicuously wiry and percussive. Probably in part due to the recording’s metallic, occasionally tough sound. Production partner Moritz von Oswald’s involvement becomes even more apparent in Tristano’s Cage recordings. Preparation of the instrument has given way to post-processing aided by studio technology subtly added by Von Oswald and Tristano. And so, the sound of Tristano’s dreamy interpretation of John Cage’s In a Landscape brings to mind distant Gamelan music echoes. The interludes by Tristano himself have a fey and disembodied effect due to the targeted use of reverb effects, and – thanks to filter technology – the final Bach Menuet II from French Suite no. 1 features the sound of a musical clock.

Another, deeper aspect comes to bear on this album, because his subjective choice of pieces sees Francesco Tristano organically blend Bach and Cage, blurring borders while emphasising shared elements. One of these being that both masters are connected by a mathematically oriented approach to composition. Tristano’s selection of pieces and their sequence, some of which has been tested in a live context, are based on tonal convergence, on cyclical structures and their polyphonic construction as duets. Tristano has also found spiritual common ground in both composers, which he conveys through his own compositions.

Perhaps Tristano is one of the first representatives of a new generation of musicians who no longer belong to a specific school. This generation also takes advantage of the fact that practically the whole repertoire of all music ever recorded is available on the Internet. The most diverse kinds of music stand alongside each other, taken out of their typical context and available in some would say, a more democratic form. Tristano makes use of this, stamping his mark on the world of music and providing a fresh and unique sound, unlike anything that has been heard before.

bachCage Track Listing.

1 Tristano Introit
Johann Sebastian Bach Partita n. 1 in Bb major, BWV 825
2 Praeludium
3 Allemande
4 Courante
5 Sarabande
6 Menuet I
7 Menuet II – Menuet I da capo
8 Gigue
9 John Cage In a Landscape (1948) (Ed. Peters)
John Cage The Seasons (1947) (Ed. Peters)
10 Prelude I
11 Winter
12 Prelude II
13 Spring
14 Prelude III
15 Summer
16 Prelude IV
17 Fall
18 Finale (Prelude I)
Johann Sebastian Bach Vier Duette 802-805
19 Duett n. 1 in E minor, BWV 802
20 Duett n. 2 in F major, BWV 803
21 Duett n. 3 in G major, BWV 804
22 Duett n. 4 in A minor, BWV 805
23 John Cage Etude Australe n Duett n. VIII, Book I (1974-75) (Ed. Peters)
24 Tristano Interludes
25 JS Bach Menuet II from French Suite n. 1, BWV 812

bachCage European tour.

27.2. 2011
Hamburg, Laeiszhalle
“bachCage”

11.4.2011
München, Allerheiligen Hofkirche
“bachCage”

12.4.2011
Frankfurt, Cocoon Club
Yellow Lounge – presenting “bachCage”

27.4.2011
Berlin, Radialsystem
“bachCage”

28.4.2011
Dresden, Yellow Lounge
presenting “bachCage”

8.5.2011
Wien, Konzerthaus
“bachCage”

9.5.2011
Klavierfestival Ruhr, Bottrop
“bachCage”

13.5.20011
Leipzig, Central Theater
“bachCage

10.9. 2011
Festspiele Mecklenburg Vorpommern
“bachCage”

Francesco Tristano Schlimé, stamping his mark on the world of music

Francesco+Tristano+Schlime+Francesco+Tristano

Classical and experimental pianist and composer, Francesco Tristano Schlimé composes both classical and electronic music

Tristano Schlimé is a genius.  He’s also an innovative musician. Born on 16 September 1981 in Luxembourg City, Schlimé studied at conservatories in Luxembourg, Brussels, Riga and Paris before graduating in music at New York’s Juilliard School.

He debuted in 2000 with the Russian National Orchestra, with which he recorded Sergey Prokofiev’s 5th Piano Concerto and Maurice Ravel’s Piano Concerto years later. In 2004, he presented and conducted, at the Grand Théâtre de Luxembourg and the Beaux-Arts in Brussels, an original transcription/adaptation for piano and strings of Antonio Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons. He was nominated by the Philharmonie Luxembourg for the 2008 European Concert Hall Organization’s Carnegie Hall Rising Stars series.

He is a specialist in Baroque music and contemporary music. In 2001, Schlimé founded The New Bach Players ensemble, with which he recorded Johann Sebastian Bach’s complete cycle of Keyboard concertos for Accord. He has also recorded the Goldberg Variations and the French Suites, as well as Girolamo Frescobaldi’s 1st book of Toccatas.

Tristano is also very involved in contemporary music too, he has recorded Luciano Berio‘s complete piano works and collaborated with electronic music artists such as Carl Craig and Murcof. He won the 2004 Concours International de piano XXe siècle d’Orléans. He is one with Rami Khalife, and Aymeric Westrich, Aufgang group whose namesake album was released in 2009.

1. Francesco Tristano the Pop artist @ 

roBOt_05 Palazzo Re Enzo Francesco Tristano

2. Francesco Tristano the Pop artist @ 

Piano feria 2 : “pop art a deux pianos”- le 7 aout 2012, espace Bellevue, Biarritz

3. Murcof and Francesco Tristano.

This is a cross-genre collaboration between Mexican electronic composer Murcof and Luxembourgian pianist and composer Francesco Tristano. An ongoing project, it was initiated from their shared base in Barcelona.

Murcof is an influential electronic producer who releases on The Leaf Label and has drawn inspiration from baroque and 20th century art music, first brought to Manchester attention performing at the 2009 Futuresonic Festival,

Francesco as one of classical music’s rising stars, a pianist who has repeatedly sought encounters outside the concert hall, performing with dance legends Carl Craig and Moritz von Oswald, and forming his band Aufgang.

Francesco Tristano is a graduate of the USA’s famous Juilliard School and debuted in 2000 with the Russian National Orchestra, with which he recorded Sergey Prokofiev’s 5th Piano Concerto and Maurice Ravel’s Piano Concerto.

He is a specialist in Baroque music. In 2001, he founded The New Bach Players ensemble, with which he recorded Johann Sebastian Bach’s complete cycle of Keyboard concertos for the Accord label. He has also recorded the Goldberg Variations and the French Suites. Very involved in contemporary music too, he has recorded Luciano Berio’s complete piano works and collaborated with electronic music artists such as Carl Craig and, as on this performance, Murcof.

Filmed by the Band on the Wall AV Unit on 15 November 2010. Distributed by Tubemogul.

Here are two music videos of Francesco Tristano for La Blogothèque’s Take Away Shows.

1.  Francesco Tristano playing ‘J.S. Bach: Partita No. 1 in B flat major BWV 825 – Allemande’Filmed at Théâtre de l’Atelier, Paris.  Images: Colin Solal Cardo. Edit: Julie Salon.  Sound & Mix: Julien Sanchez. Produced by Chryde.

2.  Francesco Tristano playing ‘Tristano Introit’ for La Blogothèque’s Take Away Shows.  Filmed at Théâtre de l’Atelier, Paris.  Images: Colin Solal Cardo. Edit: Julie Salon. Sound & Mix : Julien Sanchez. Produced by Chryde.

Listen to Francesco Tristano play John Cage’s “In A Landscape”. The piece is taken from the  album “bachCage” on Deutsche Grammophon. Dub techno legend Moritz von Oswald is responsible for the recording’s mastering.