Pearl Jam Play Entire ‘No Code,’ Debut New Song at Moline Concert

 

 

 

Pearl Jam had a pair of major surprises in store for fans at their Friday night concert at Moline, Illinois’ iWireless Center. Not only did Eddie Vedder debut a new song dedicated to the Quad Cities town, Pearl Jam performed their 1996 album No Code straight through in its entirety, from “Sometimes” to closer “Around the Bend,” Jambase reports. “No Code. Front to back. #PJMoline #PJFall2014,” the band tweeted before sharing a photo of the Moline setlist, which confirmed that the new song Vedder debuted onstage was also called “Moline.”

According to WQAD, Vedder told the crowd that the new song was written especially for Moline and the Quad Cities area. “Moline, it seems, this is for me. You can call me Nancy and I live in Moline,” Vedder sings on the track that’s about a woman who leaves Detroit for the Illinois city. Vedder also revealed that he’d written the song just minutes before the band took the stage, and that the cut was related to Vitalogy‘s “Better Man.”

It’s unclear why Pearl Jam opted to make Moline, Illinois the setting for the No Code performance other than the fact that the 1996 album was partially recorded nearly two decades ago at the not-so-nearby Chicago Recording Company studio. Vedder joked following the performance of No Code‘s “Off He Goes,” “Alright, end of side one.” The singer told the crowd that the No Code performance marked only the second time the band had performed a studio album of theirs in its entirety; as the band’s official message board points out, Pearl Jam played their whole 2006 self-titled record, out of sequence, at a Torino, Italy concert in September of that year.

In a wild coincidence, on the same night that the Foo Fighters were rocking out with Cheap Trick’s Rick Nielsen at Chicago’s the Cubby Bear and on a previously recorded Late Show With David Letterman performance, Mike McCready also paid tribute to the guitarist by busting out a checkerboard guitar Nielsen had given him while Jeff Ament brought out a bass with a similar pattern.

Pearl Jam’s Musician and Activist Eddie Vedder : ‘Black’ + Interview

 

 

Eddie Vedder Talks Music, Activism

Pearl Jam exploded onto the Seattle music scene in 1991 and has been fending off celebrity ever since. The group’s debut album, “Ten,” reached No. 2 on the pop charts and has sold some 12 million copies, but the band shunned endorsements and shied away from almost all self-promotion, even refusing to make videos for a time. Close to two decades later, it’s clear they didn’t need the hype. In a 2005 USA Today readers’ poll, Pearl Jam was voted the greatest American rock band of all time. They’ve managed to take up causes from health care to antitrust, even testifying before Congress in a Justice Department probe into Ticketmaster. Currently at work on their ninth studio album, Pearl Jam is re-releasing “Ten” in four new and expanded editions that include six bonus tracks. Lead singer Eddie Vedder, 44, spoke about the reissue, balancing music with activism, and life as a father of two. Excerpts:

How has Pearl Jam changed in the years since “Ten” was first released?
Eddie Vedder: I think in so many ways we’ve grown up, but I think in music you’re also able to hang on to a part of youth that in a normal job you’d have to surrender. In a way, it was a blessing that we didn’t have families at the time, because we could give everything to the music. But I never thought we’d have to actually look back and answer questions about 20 years ago.

How much of this has become about activism for you, and how much is still about music?
I think it’s always been a balance. I think music is the greatest art form that exists, and I think people listen to music for different reasons, and it serves different purposes. Some of it is background music, and some of it is things that might affect a person’s day, if not their life, or change an attitude. The best songs are the ones that make you feel something. But it’s really a balance, because part of it is just, well, you’re a rock-and-roll band. But what happens is you learn that a rock-and-roll band can be a whole lot of things.

Has the way you pursue activism changed?
Back [in our early days] it was very knee-jerk: You’d want to kick out a stained-glass window to get your point across. Now you try to deliver better business plans to corporate entities so they can still make a profit, but do it without destroying land or culture.

Has having a family changed your views about celebrity?
I don’t really have too many views on it, to be honest. [Laughs] Seattle’s very close-knit, and I don’t feel any different, even though I have a different job than some of the other parents at school. How else do I answer that?

Well, what’s it like to be a rock star?
You know, rock stardom … I have a hard time discussing that because I don’t really accept it. It’s not really that tangible. What’s really bizarre is how it’s used as a thing—you know, “He’s the rock star of politics,” “He’s the rock star of quarterbacks”—like it’s the greatest thing in the world. And it’s not bad, but it’s just different. I don’t understand it. Cause I’m going, “Well—am I that?” I want to be the plumber of rock stars.

How do you keep your music relevant?
I think by pushing the boundaries, by not doing something you’ve already done, and pushing each other as bandmates to create in a new way.

Do you miss that Seattle heyday of the early ’90s at all?
I think what we miss is the bands all showing up at each other’s shows, and five people being up onstage, and then the next night the same people that were up onstage being in the audience and vice versa. Everyone was very supportive of each other. And, you know, there were some great f–king living-room parties as well. And it still happens, it’s just a little less.

Does that community you talk about still exist?
You know, it’s amazing how few bands are able to keep it together. But I’d like to think there’s still a number of us who, for lack of a better word, are slaves to rock and roll. It’s in us and we need it. And I think it’s trickier now because a lot of us have to be a little bit more grown up. We’re parents and we’re figuring out how to do both. Because as much as I would dedicate my life solely to music, I wouldn’t sacrifice the kids’ upbringing to do it.

You recently had a second daughter.
Yep, she’s 4 months old. She was born on Bruce Springsteen’s birthday. So my one kid’s 4, my other kid’s 4 months, I’m 44 —it’s all lining up nicely here.

Do you still wear a lot of flannel?
I’m not wearing one today, but I sure was wearing one yesterday.

 

Eddie Vedder sings ‘Imagine’ in response to criticism

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Eddie Vedder frontman of Pearl Jam

This week, Pearl Jam frontman Eddie Vedder drew criticism for comments he made regarding the current Israeli-Palestinian conflict in Gaza. “I swear to fucking God, there are people out there who are looking for a reason to kill!” Vedder proclaimed during the band’s recent concert in England. “They’re looking for a reason to go across borders and take over land that doesn’t belong to them. They should get the fuck out and mind their own fucking business.” While Vedder never made reference to a specific country, many Israeli news publications have since dubbed his comments as anti-Israel, as Rolling Stone reports.

Eddie Vedder has a message for his critics: “Imagine.”

The Pearl Jam frontman addressed recent criticism of his anti-war comments by playing the John Lennon classic at a solo show Friday in Meco, Portugal.

“I think it is the most powerful song ever written, which is why I have never played it. It seems like maybe there is a reason to play it,” Vedder said, according to a video posted on the website Consequence of Sound.

“(Being) anti-war make(s) you pro many things. Pro peace, pro human, pro evolution,” he said before introducing the song. “Makes you pro communication, pro diplomacy, pro love, pro understanding, pro forgiveness.”

In recent weeks, Vedder has made headlines, first with an antiwar rant at a concert in Milton Keynes, England, and later comments on Pearl Jam’s website.

“I swear to f****** God, there are people out there who are looking for a reason to kill!” Vedder said at the English show before singing Edwin Starr’s “War.” “They’re looking for a reason to go across borders and take over land that doesn’t belong to them.”

Those comments were viewed by some Israeli publications as anti-Israel, Rolling Stone reported. One Israeli DJ, who was hoping to bring Pearl Jam to Israel, said that Vedder was now “invited not to come here.”

In response, Vedder reiterated his anti-war beliefs on Pearl Jam’s website in a post titled “Imagine That — I’m Still Anti-War.”

“Call me naïve. I’d rather be naïve, heartfelt and hopeful than resigned to say nothing for fear of misinterpretation and retribution,” he wrote. “War hurts. It hurts no matter which sides the bombs are falling on. … I know that we can’t let the sadness turn into apathy. And I do know we are better off when we reach out to each other.”

He then quoted from “Imagine”: ” ‘I hope someday you’ll join us,… ‘ ” and added a bit of Paul McCartney: “Won’t you listen to what the man said.”

Eddie Vedder has a message for his critics: “Imagine.”

The Pearl Jam frontman addressed recent criticism of his anti-war comments by playing the John Lennon classic at a solo show Friday in Meco, Portugal.

“I think it is the most powerful song ever written, which is why I have never played it. It seems like maybe there is a reason to play it,” Vedder said, according to a video posted on the website Consequence of Sound.

“(Being) anti-war make(s) you pro many things. Pro peace, pro human, pro evolution,” he said before introducing the song. “Makes you pro communication, pro diplomacy, pro love, pro understanding, pro forgiveness.”

In recent weeks, Vedder has made headlines, first with an antiwar rant at a concert in Milton Keynes, England, and later comments on Pearl Jam’s website.

“I swear to f****** God, there are people out there who are looking for a reason to kill!” Vedder said at the English show before singing Edwin Starr’s “War.” “They’re looking for a reason to go across borders and take over land that doesn’t belong to them.”

Those comments were viewed by some Israeli publications as anti-Israel, Rolling Stone reported. One Israeli DJ, who was hoping to bring Pearl Jam to Israel, said that Vedder was now “invited not to come here.”

In response, Vedder reiterated his anti-war beliefs on Pearl Jam’s website in a post titled “Imagine That — I’m Still Anti-War.”

“Call me naïve. I’d rather be naïve, heartfelt and hopeful than resigned to say nothing for fear of misinterpretation and retribution,” he wrote. “War hurts. It hurts no matter which sides the bombs are falling on. … I know that we can’t let the sadness turn into apathy. And I do know we are better off when we reach out to each other.”

He then quoted from “Imagine”: ” ‘I hope someday you’ll join us,… ‘ ” and added a bit of Paul McCartney: “Won’t you listen to what the man said.”

A transcript of Vedder’s full introduction of the song:

“You know if you are anti war, If your anti war it doesn’t mean you are pro one side or the other in a conflict. However it does make you pro many things We are not alone after all. Take this CNN, That’s good, that’s nice, or whomever.

“Well, so anti war make you pro many things. Pro peace, pro human, pro evolution, Makes you pro communication, pro diplomacy, pro love, pro understanding, pro forgiveness. You know some people don’t understand how you can be pro soldier. If you are anti war your pro soldier because you don’t want the soldier to be put in harms way. To sacrifice himself or herself for some reason that’s not…for no good reason. I have many, many…We have many, many friends of the group and through out our lives we’ve met incredible people and in the armed forces. We have an understanding and they listen our music and they get it so I’m not sure…You know sometimes if you speak out people are going to misunderstand and they take things a certain way or another. If you don’t speak out you don’t know..If someone doesn’t like it probably means it has some kind of meaning. It’s not just bullshit. It’s not just nothing. So this next song I always thought it was probably the most powerful song ever written. I think it is the most powerful song ever written. Which is why I have never played it. It seems like maybe there is a reason to play it. If you’d like join me or use your voices or hold a light there might be some people out there that need to know they are not alone.”

Krist Novoselic Comments on Israel-Palestine Conflict, Defends Vedder

“It is the knuckleheads on both sides that should be criticized and not the singer from a rock band”

Krist Novoselic Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images.

Krist Novoselic
Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images.

 

July 21, 2014

Former Nirvana bassist and political activist Krist Novoselic has voiced his support for Eddie Vedder’s recent anti-war statements in a post on his website. Over the past week, the Pearl Jam frontman has made several comments condemning war in general. When the Israeli media interpreted the statements as referring to that country’s ongoing conflict with Palestine, Vedder posted a statement to Pearl Jam’s website saying, “War hurts. It hurts no matter which sides the bombs are falling on.” Novoselic also interpreted the comments to be about Palestine and Israel and wrote to Vedder, “I stand with you my friend!!!”

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“The people of Palestine and Israel deserve peace and prosperity,” the bassist wrote. “It is time to stop repeating the same old arguments, dogma and hate speech. It is the knuckleheads on both sides that should be criticized and not the singer from a rock band. In addition, both sides need to make hard decisions about finding a settlement to the catastrophe that is Israel/Palestine.”

For most of his 550-word missive on the subject, Novoselic addressed the decades-long conflict between the two countries. He praised Israel for encouraging religious freedom in its country and acknowledging that millions of Palestinians feel that Israel has displaced them. But he also pontificated on the long-term effects of war, specifically between Israel and Palestine. “[Palestinian] Hamas’ policy of not recognizing Israel is a dead end,” he wrote at one juncture. Elsewhere, he wrote, “You can give any anecdote you want about how small Israel is in comparison to the rest of the Middle East but the sentiment is still there – Palestinians feel that their land was taken away.”

“Our world is connected as never before,” the bassist wrote. “People from all corners of the planet share culture and commerce at the click of a mouse. In contrast to this great convergence of humanity, Israel is building tall concrete walls while Palestinians fire rockets over them. There’s a shared recent history between these people, and I think there could be a shared future that’s more in tune with what’s going on with our ever-connected universe.”

Novoselic compared the conflict to the way Ireland settled “the troubles” of the 1960s in Ireland, and how the “19th Century idea” of Yugoslavia ultimately fell apart. “In both these cases, a resolution of the conflict was buttressed by the promise of the stability needed for prosperity to happen,” wrote Novoselic, who was born to immigrants from Croatia, a country that was part of Yugoslavia until the early Nineties.

“Thank you Eddie Vedder for speaking up for peace in our world,” Novoselic wrote. “Eddie has gotten some criticism over comments he made about the conflict between the Palestinians and Israelis. That situation has been messed up for so long, it is no wonder that even mentioning it is toxic. Let’s face it, the relationship between the Palestinians and the Israelis is a disaster! I don’t know how many times I have heard the same explanations and excuses and it matters not, there is a continuing catastrophe between those two peoples.”

Most recently, Vedder spoke against war at his July 18th solo concert in Portugal, where he also played what he called “the most powerful song ever written,” John Lennon’s “Imagine.” “If you’re anti-war it doesn’t mean you are ‘pro’ one side or the other in a conflict,” he said.

Pearl Jam’s U.S. Tour Dates

Eddie Vedder - Frontman of Pearl Jam

Eddie Vedder – Frontman of Pearl Jam / Photo Jason Oxenham/Getty Images

Pearl Jam have announced a 12-city October U.S. tour, following a summer trek to Europe, that includes their appearance at Austin City Limits Music Festival. Tickets for the shows go on sale May 30th.

Last year, the group put out their 10th studio album, Lightning Bolt, which frontman Eddie Vedder kvelled about in an interview with Rolling Stone. “I say this in the least-competitive way possible, but we’re trying to make not just the best Pearl Jam record, but just the best record,” the singer said. “It’s about getting to the next level of communication, or just trying to crack a code into some higher plane of playing music.”

Outside of the world of Pearl Jam, the group’s guitarist Mike McCready wrote an article for Rolling Stone about how Kiss had inspired him growing up, as the makeup-faced hard rockers were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Moreover, he revealed that he wasn’t the only member of his band to garner inspiration from the group. “Pearl Jam sit down and have conversations about Kiss all the time on tour,” he wrote. “My band used to do ‘C’Mon and Love Me.’ Matt Cameron played in a Kiss tribute band when he was 14. They got so big around San Diego that they got a cease-and-desist order from Casablanca Records. Jeff Ament used to play ‘She’ in his band Deranged Diction. There’s a Kiss through-line to a lot of the music that came out of Seattle, and it hasn’t been talked about a lot.”

Via Rolling Stone Mag

Pearl Jam U.S. tour dates:
10/1 Cincinnati, OH – U.S. Bank Arena
10/3 St. Louis, MO – Scottrade Center
10/4 – 10/5 Austin, TX – Austin City Limits
10/8 Tulsa, OK – BOK Center
10/9 Lincoln, NE – Pinnacle Bank Arena
10/10 – 10/12 Austin, TX – Austin City Limits
10/14 Memphis, TN – FedEx Forum
10/16 Detroit, MI – Joe Louis Arena
10/17 Moline, IL – iWireless Center
10/19 St. Paul, NM – Xcel Energy Center
10/20 Milwaukee, WI – BMO Harris Bradley Center
10/22 Denver, CO – Pepsi Center

Watch: Pearl Jam Cover the Dead Boys With Joey Ramone

 
Via Rolling Stone
 

Pearl Jam have toured with a lot of amazing opening acts over the years, sharing the stage with Iggy Pop, Sleater-Kinney, the Buzzcocks, Cheap Trick and many, many more. But nothing is likely to top four American shows in September 1995, when the Ramones were on the bill. The punk icons were on a farewell tour that year, playing a career high 73 gigs. Their last gig together was September 17th at Tad Gormley Stadium in New Orleans.

During the encore, in a moment that Ramones super fan Eddie Vedder is likely to never forget, Joey Ramone came onstage and sang the Dead Boys classic “Sonic Reducer” with the band. This was obviously before the era of smartphones, but camcorders were rolling in the audience. Here’s the best available video, which was spliced together from two sources.

Despite pledging that they would break-up following their 1995 tour, the Ramones got a big money offer to headline Lollapalooza in the summer of 1996, so the tour kept going. They played their final show at the Palace in Hollywood, California. Eddie Vedder joined them for the final encore, a cover of “Anyway You Want It” by the Dave Clark Five.

Six years later, Eddie Vedder inducted the Ramones in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He spoke for 17 minutes. “They were armed with two-minute songs that they rattled off like machine gun fire,” he said. “It was enough to change the Earth’s revolution. Now it’s Disney kids singing songs written by old men and being marketed to six- and seven-year-olds, so some kind of change might have to happen again soon.”

Tragically, Joey Ramone wasn’t around to receive the honor. He passed away the previous April (Cancer claimed punk legend and Ramones founder). . Dee Dee Ramone died of a heroin overdose just three months later, and Jonny Ramone died of prostate cancer in 2004. Eddie Vedder spoke at his funeral.

With no support other than CBGB owner Hilly Kristal, the Ramones became the first of the New York punk rock and New Wave bands to land a major-label record deal. Their first four records, The Ramones, The Ramones Leave Home, and Road to Run are widely considered the blueprint for punk rock. The band’s legacy was further assured with its starring role in the Roger Corman cult-film, Rock and Roll High School in 1979. A year later the band wore their Sixties pop influences on their sleeves when they enlisted Phil Spector to produce their fifth studio album, End of the Century. The album featured a cover of the Ronettes’ “Baby I Love You,” their biggest hit in either the U.S. or the U.K.