Radiohead launch PolyFauna app

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The app features imagery and sounds from ‘The King Of Limbs’ track ‘Bloom’
Writing about the app at Radiohead.com, Thom Yorke explained it as “an experimental collaboration between us (Radiohead) & Universal Everything, born out of ‘The King of Limbs’ sessions and using the imagery and the sounds from the song ‘Bloom’. It comes from an interest in early computer life-experiments and the imagined creatures of our subconscious.”
He then posted instructions on how to use the app, writing: “Your screen is the window into an evolving world. Move around to look around. You can follow the red dot. You can wear headphones.” The app can be downloaded through Radiohead.com.Last month, Radiohead’s Colin Greenwood said that Radiohead’s plans for a new album are “up in the air” as members of the band focus on side projects. Greenwood spoke to Drowned In Sound and revealed that he and his fellow Radiohead members are looking forward to making new music together but admitted that they are enjoying some time at home as the dust settles from touring their last album, ‘The King Of Limbs’.
Quizzed on current activity in the Radiohead camp, Greenwood says: “It’s all up in the air at the minute. Thom’s just come back from touring Atoms For Peace and he’s having some quiet time. I’m sorry to be vague but we’re all just taking it easy at the moment. Just enjoying being at home and hanging out really. But at the same time, the vibe is very much Oxford and all good! It’s like that.”Maintaining that live shows remain a long way off, Greenwood continues, “I wish I could say we were going to start work and put something out then spend 12 months on the road touring but we’re just enjoying being at home right now. We had the best time when spent the last two years touring ‘The King Of Limbs’. We all really enjoyed that. It was a really positive time. We definitely want to do it all again but we’ve just got to give it some time for the dust to settle. What I’m trying to say is everyone’s very happy and positive and looking forward to the next adventure.”

Thom Yorke: Spotify is “the last desperate fart of a dying corpse”

Thom Yorke

Thom Yorke – By Alex Young on October 3rd, 2013

“We are entering an age when potentially all creativity stops, the past informs the future, there is no other future.” ~ Adam Curtis

Earlier this year, Radiohead’s Thom Yorke and Nigel Godrich pulled many of their own records from Spotify, including Yorke’s solo album, The Eraser, the full-length debut by Atoms For Peace, Amok, and the full-length debut by Godrich’s Ultrai­sta. The artists cited Spotify’s unfair royalty payments and declared, “Someone gotta say something. It’s bad for new music.”

Yorke continued his crusade against Spotify during a recent interview with Mexico’s Sopitas.com:

“I feel like the way people are listening to music is going through this big transition. I feel like as musicians we need to fight the Spotify thing. I feel that in some ways what’s happening in the mainstream is the last gasp of the old industry. Once that does finally die, which it will, something else will happen. But it’s all about how we change the way we listen to music, it’s all about what happens next in terms of technology, in terms of how people talk to each other about music, and a lot of it could be really fucking bad. I don’t subscribe to the whole thing that a lot of people do within the music industry that’s ‘well this is all we’ve got left. we’ll just have to do this.’ I just don’t agree.

When we did the In Rainbows thing what was most exciting was the idea you could have a direct connection between you as a musician and your audience. You cut all of it out, it’s just that and that. And then all these fuckers get in a way, like Spotify suddenly trying to become the gatekeepers to the whole process. We don’t need you to do it. No artists needs you to do it. We can build the shit ourselves, so fuck off. But because they’re using old music, because they’re using the majors… the majors are all over it because they see a way of re-selling all their old stuff for free, make a fortune, and not die. That’s why to me, Spotify the whole thing, is such a massive battle, because it’s about the future of all music. It’s about whether we believe there’s a future in music, same with the film industry, same with books.

To me this isn’t the mainstream, this is is like the last fart, the last desperate fart of a dying corpse. What happens next is the important part.

Yorke went on to relay his recent conversation with Massive Attack collaborator Adam Curtis in which Curtis said, “We are entering an age when potentially all creativity stops, the past informs the future, there is no other future.” Yorke continued:

“And, it’s like, ‘fucking right, man.’ You know, people like us and him and Massive Attack we need to be standing together. Bullshit, it ain’t over. It’s like this mind trick going on, people are like ‘with technology, it’s all going to become one in the cloud and all creativity is going to become one thing and no one is going to get paid and it’s this big super intelligent thing.” Bullshit. It’s hard not to think about it all the time, because to me it’s the most important thing happening in music since when… it’s like when the printing press came out.”

Listen to the full interview below. Yorke’s comments about Spotify kick in around the 17:30 mark.

(2013/09/29) Reactor 105, Rulo David, Thom
Radiohead’s interviews’ archive

Atoms For Peace – AMOK + Radiohead documentary 10/10

Thom Yorke by Jeremy Cowart

Thom Yorke by Jeremy Cowart

New Yorker

Thom Yorke is one of the most popular worriers in popular music. In the documentary “Meeting People Is Easy,” made while Radiohead toured for its landmark album, “OK Computer,” and released in 1998, Yorke appears as a young man full of trepidation about becoming famous. His anxiety has since mostly abated, but his sense of displacement has not: his musical worries are now more like chess moves than like agonized referendums on his life.

While Radiohead continues to be a commercially successful group, Yorke’s newest project is an experimental rock and dance band called Atoms for Peace, which centers on him and his longtime collaborator the producer and musician Nigel Godrich. “Amok” is the group’s first full album.

Yorke’s voice is an unrelentingly beautiful thing that sometimes bothers him for precisely that quality. He sings in a strong and aspirate voice, and favors legato phrasing. His pitch is sufficiently accurate so that he uses vibrato only when he needs to—as an effect that can be drawn on for any number of aesthetic reasons. His singing is so pretty that Radiohead can sometimes lack the aggression that is a crucial aspect of much rock music, especially the average kind. The farther Radiohead has moved away from the traditional guitar-rock moves of its first two albums, “Pablo Honey” and “The Bends,” the more satisfying and comfortable the band has become. This is largely because Yorke’s voice works well in all melodic and harmonic styles. On his one solo album—“The Eraser,” from 2006—Yorke seemed happy mostly to replicate Radiohead’s choices. But “Amok” resists, amicably, the reassuring quality of his singing. As Yorke’s voice becomes more plangent, his backing tracks are increasingly fractured. While Jonny Greenwood, his most visible bandmate in Radiohead, has continued to score films (notably Paul Thomas Anderson’s “There Will Be Blood”) and expand on his wide harmonic gift, Yorke seems to be going in the opposite direction, searching for the simplest pairing of beat and melody that can successfully undergird a song. Yorke has characterized “Amok” as “a sort of dance-music record,” and though it likely won’t be filed as such, owing to its clear vocal lines, it is gloriously rhythmic.

The first time that Yorke made dance music for public consumption was in 2000, with the song “Idioteque,” from Radiohead’s “Kid A.” That track is syncopated, its rhythms audibly small and clicky, and those attributes still show up in Yorke’s work. And, while he has a reputation as a physically awkward stage presence, in the 2011 video for Radiohead’s “Lotus Flower” he abandons restraint. The clip shows Yorke in a bowler hat, a white shirt, and black pants, dancing in a focussed but intent ecstasy that recalls both Ian Curtis, from Joy Division, and Prince. The dancing represented a public shift. Radiohead fans may have been hankering for big rock anthems like “Airbag” and “Street Spirit,” but Yorke had turned away from large musical gestures and gone deep into finely articulated rhythm and texture.

Yorke’s involvement in the dance community is not shallow. He has collaborated with artists he admires, like the California producer Flying Lotus and the virtuosic Berlin production duo Modeselektor.

Last September, Yorke, Godrich, and the drummer Joey Waronker, all of Atoms for Peace, made a visit to New York. On a Friday night, Yorke played a d.j. set at the Wooly, a bar in lower Manhattan; the next day, Godrich and Yorke performed Atoms for Peace material at MOMA PS1, in Queens. At the Wooly, a modified speakeasy with antique upholstered couches and wall sconces, Yorke wore a gray T-shirt and stared at a laptop on a stand. His selections generally avoided melody, blending stretches of condensed, grainy rhythm with stomping drum-and-bass tunes from the mid-nineties. The studied cool of the crowd of models and musicians relaxed long enough for dancing to break out.

At PS1, the audience was delighted to see the band, and there was less feigned nonchalance. A little before sunset, Godrich and Yorke appeared. Godrich, who has short dark hair and wore a red Lacoste track jacket over a dark-gray T-shirt, looked a bit like a rugby player. He stood in front of a laptop, and Yorke moved out in front of him, to dance and sing, separated from the crowd by railings and several security guards. Yorke’s brown hair, gathered into a short ponytail, is flecked with gray. He wore black jeans, sneakers without socks, and a vest over a white T-shirt. Godrich began “Amok” ’s opening track, “Before Your Very Eyes,” and the crowd cheered at Yorke’s guitar line, a scratchy two-part figure that flutters down quickly, sounding both strummed and picked. Holding the mike with his right hand, Yorke raised his left hand and began to shimmy, dipping his shoulders back and forth. He sang smoothly, at the very top of his falsetto range, over the music, which turned into a series of synth chords over a scuffling beat.

For the next track, “Ingenue,” Yorke stepped back and stood next to Godrich, singing some of the lyrics from a small black Moleskine notebook. The song is built from a weepy, descending bass line that is answered by a high figure, which plays a clump of small, hard sounds that are like both live instruments and computer-generated signals. Much of “Amok” goes along these basic lines: a synthetic keyboard runs down the middle, flanked by a series of crackling drum sounds and minimal bass or guitar patterns. Very little of the record is cloudy or vague; Yorke does not lean heavily on multi-tracking his voice. “Amok” is stripped down, all points and lines. Often, it sounds like a dance remix of a Thom Yorke song.

John Frusciante "Flea"

John Frusciante “Flea”

The album is an odd beast, born of marathon jam sessions at which several musicians (including the bassist Flea, from the Red Hot Chili Peppers) contributed; the earliest was more than two years ago. But it is Yorke’s project, directed by him and Godrich, and constructed in such a way that some songs sound as if there were no live musicians involved. “Default,” one of the album’s best tracks, is a mesh of keyboard pulses and rattling wooden noises. Sounds ripple and echo around the tonal material, but there is nothing as traditional as a buildup or a breakdown—most of “Amok” simply kicks in and goes. Yorke sings in the same full voice he uses in Radiohead, though occasionally he drifts to that thinner falsetto which hangs high above all the electronics.

Live performance is central to Radiohead’s career, and when I next saw Yorke, in London a few months later, the band had recently ended a nine-month tour begun after its previous release, “The King of Limbs,” in 2011. Yorke, who is forty-four, seemed considerably more tired than he had in New York, and was wearing a leather jacket and a thick woollen sweater against an unseasonably cold English winter. He wore several chunky silver rings on each hand and rubbed his eyes repeatedly.

“I haven’t really had a break,” he said, sounding a little bit like the younger man of 1998, who had the weight of the world on his shoulders. Apart from the drain of being on tour, Yorke has reasons for fatigue. Last June, roughly in the middle of Radiohead’s tour, a metal canopy collapsed before a show in Toronto, killing one of the band’s crew members. The event seems to haunt Yorke. Because he is a member of Atoms for Peace, the group received offers to headline festivals. But he was equivocal, and seems most excited about bringing out the laptops again for a brief, three-city tour. “If we get it right, it would be different every time we do it,” he told me. “We’d add things and strip things off it. It’s something I’ve been wanting to do for ages.”

Documentary:  Radiohead – Meeting People Is Easy  10/10










 

 

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Watch Atoms for Peace Perform “Judge Jury and Executioner” – Thom Yorke

Watch Atoms for Peace Perform “Judge Jury and Executioner” – Thom Yorke

Update: XL Recordings have revealed the deluxe edition packaging for Atoms for Peace’s forthcoming debut album, Amok. Check it out in gif form below.

Naturally, the build-up to the release of the Thom Yorke/Nigel Godrich/Flea/Joey Waronker/Maouro Refosco project Atoms for Peace‘s debut album has been marked by relative mystery.

Now, if you scroll through the Stanley Donwood-designed landscape on Atoms for Peace’s website, you’ll find a grim-looking little man wearing a black hooded jacket in a rowing boat; when clicked, he reveals a live video of the band performing “Judge Jury and Executioner” at Japan’s Fuji Rock festival.

Rather than spoil your fun by posting it here, scroll along yourself to unearth the clip, and watch a Tarik Barri-designed visual for the song below.

[ click on image ]

[ click on image ]

Update: That’s the single artwork above. It will be released on 12″ vinyl accompanied by the B-side “S.A.D.” on March 19.

Thom Yorke and Nigel Godrich just dropped by Zane Lowe’s BBC Radio 1 show, where they premiered the new single from the Atoms for Peace project, “Judge Jury and Executioner”. It’s off their album Amok, which is out February 25 in the UK and February 26 in the U.S. via XL Recordings.

Atoms for Peace also features the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ Flea, Joey Waronker, and percussionist Mauro Refosco. Talking with Lowe, Yorke and Godrich said that they don’t have any shows planned at the moment, but they’re considering a European tour. They hinted that members of the group will probably play Glastonbury in some capacity. But according to Yorke, the full band “won’t have our shit together by then.”

As for that Radiohead stuff recorded at Jack White’s Third Man Studio, Yorke said it will be released eventually, “but I have to pick the kids up from school first.”

The single is available for purchase on iTunes starting at midnight UK time or offered as a free download for those who pre-order the album.

There’s also an accompanying visual for the track, with imagery by Tarik Barri. See below:

Update: This is the single artwork above. It will be released on 12" vinyl accompanied by the B-side "S.A.D." on March 19.  There's also an ccompanying visual for the track, with imagery by Tarik Barri.

Update: This is the single artwork above. It will be released on 12″ vinyl accompanied by the B-side “S.A.D.” on March 19. There’s also an accompanying visual for the track, with imagery by Tarik Barri.

Radiohead’s Video “Daily Mail” Shot at Bonnaroo

Here’s a music video for Radiohead’s Live From the Basement single “Daily Mail”, shot at this year’s Bonnaroo Festival in Tennessee. Directed by Matt Ornstein, it’s a time-lapsed clip of a bunch of festival footage soundtracked by the audio from Radiohead’s live performance of the song– watch it below.

After The Gold Rush: Patti Smith and Thom Yorke – By Rolling Stone

After the Gold Rush is an original song by Neil Young (1970) included in the Patti Smith album “Banga”, it was released in June 2012. Hurry up, listen. This file will be destroyed at anytime.// After the Gold Rush es una canción original de Neil Young (1970) incluida en el disco de Patti Smith “Banga”, él que fue lanzado en Junio de 2012. Apúrate, escucha. Este archivo se destruirá en cualquier momento.

Patti Smith, ‘After the Gold Rush’
Smith’s latest album, ‘Banga,’ closes with a tender cover of Neil Young’s 1971 classic. “I love covering Neil’s songs because I can sing them in the same key,” she says.

Thom Yorke, ‘After the Gold Rush’
Radiohead’s frontman is another famous fan of the environmentally themed song. He’s covered it several times, including at the 2002 edition of Young’s Bridge School Benefit, heard here.

Radiohead Reschedule Shows After Toronto Collapse


Photo by Mitch Manzella

String of dates postponed until September
By Carrie Battan
Pitchfork
on June 27, 2012 at 10:22 a.m.

Following the recent Toronto stage collapse that killed drum technician Scott Johnson, Radiohead announced that they would need to postpone a string of June and July tour dates due to damage to their light show and stage setup. Those dates have been rescheduled for late September. All original tickets are valid for the rescheduled dates, and there are some refund options– find the new schedule below.

Drummer Phil Selway posted on the band’s website, “Thanks to all of you who have sent messages of support over these past couple of weeks. Scott has touched many people’s lives and all your sentiments are testament to this. Our thoughts and love remain with Scott’s family.”

Radiohead:

07-01 Florence, Italy – Parco Delle Cascine
07-03 Bologna, Italy – Piazza Maggiore
07-04 Codroipo, Italy – Villa Manin
07-06 Berlin, Germany – Wuhlheide
07-07 Berlin, Germany – Wuhlheide
07-09 Canton de Vaud, Switzerland – Quarry of St Triphon
07-10 Nimes, France – Les Arenes #
07-11 Nimes, France – Les Arenes #
07-13 Kobetamendi Park, Spain – Bilbao BBK Live
07-15 Lisbon, Portugal – Optimus Alive Fest
07-25 Taipei, Taiwan – Nanang Exhibition Hall
07-27 Jisan, South Korea – Jisan Valley Rock Festival
07-29 Niigata, Japan – Fuji Rock Festival
09-20 Canton de Vaud, Switzerland – Quarry of St Triphon
09-22 Rome, Italy – Hyppodrome Capanelle
09-23 Florence, Italy – Parco Delle Cascine
09-25 Bologna, Italy – Arena Parco Nord
09-26 Codroipo, Italy – Villa Manin
09-29 Berlin, Germany – Wuhlheide
09-30 Berlin, Germany – Wuhlheide
10-06 Manchester, England – Manchester Arena
10-08 London, England – o2 Arena
10-09 London, England – 02 Arena
10-14 Amsterdam, Netherlands – Ziggo Dome
10-15 Cologne, Germany – Lanxess Arena
10-18 Antwerp, Belgium – Sportpaleis
11-06 Auckland, New Zealand – Vector Arena $
11-09 Brisbane, Australia – Entertainment Centre $
11-12 Sydney, Australia – Entertainment Centre $
11-13 Sydney, Australia – Entertainment Centre $
11-16 Melbourne, Australia – Rod Laver Arena $
11-17 Melbourne Australia – Rod Laver Arena $

# with Caribou
$ with Connan Mockasin