The Strypes in New York, Jan 22, 2014 – The Studio @ Webster Hall

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Inside a small, sweaty club, four young men are tearing through songs by the likes of Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley. They wear tight suits and ties, have mops of hair and the vocalist clutches a harmonica to blow up a storm of ferocious rhythm and blues. It is, perhaps, not unlike witnessing the young Rolling Stones at the Marquee in 1962. However, the band are the Strypes, from Cavan in Ireland; their average age is 16.

Watching The Strypes perform, you’re struck by a worrying thought that these four Irish teens have been body-snatched by a band of hoary old pub rockers. On record, happily, they sound their age. Debut album ‘Snapshot’ sees the band stomp through a dozen tunes in 35 minutes, guitars squealing impressively and harmonicas wailing throughout. It’s bread and butter blues-rock, packed with lyrical anachronisms and clichés, but it’s done well and – importantly – is not as shamelessly retro as those covers-packed live shows. The downside of this is, occasionally, they sound a little bit like McFly. The upside is that The Strypes have begun to carve out a personality of their own.

Some of the Strypes’ covers – among them Diddley’s I Can Tell and Leiber/Stoller’s I’m a Hog for You Baby – were given a similar electric shock by Dr Feelgood in the 1970s; and indeed the wild-eyed, instrument-shaking guitarist Josh McClorey has more than a hint of the Canvey islanders’ Wilko Johnson.

Their original songs hold their own. Blue Collar Jane and I’m No Good are raw, three-minute, lip-curling explosions of adolescent concerns delivered with blistering musicianship. As the gig progresses, the quartet play their instruments increasingly as if they’re taming wild animals, their hair becomes more unruly, their screaming racket more thrillingly demented. There’s a wonderful moment when McClorey holds a note, stares at the crowd as if in utter shock, returns to the note and then looks up again as he crashes into a riff.

They could well become absolutely huge, and once the cancer-stricken Johnson plays his final dates this spring, he can rest knowing that a younger generation is taking up the cause.

The Strypes’ Debut Album ‘Snapshot’ is an electrifying collage of the band’s own material

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The Strypes’ Debut Album ‘Snapshot’ Released Sept 9th 2013

Just under a year after they emerged with their first release – ‘Young, Gifted & Blue’, a set of vintage R’n’B covers – The Strypes are set to crown their phenomenal rise with the release of their debut full-length album – ‘Snapshot‘, available since September 9th on Virgin EMI.

Few bands have rocketed in 2013 as The Strypes have without the hype à la Haim. Entering the year on the back of praise for ‘Young, Gifted & Blue’ and swelling excitement surrounding their astonishingly explosive live shows, The Strypes released their major label debut single – ‘Blue Collar Jane’ – in April, shortly before playing a show at the legendary 100 Club in London, tickets for which sold out within the space of an hour.

They’ve since continued to tour extensively, including a set on the BBC Introducing stage at Glastonbury that saw the tent completely packed out. The Strypes will extend their reach even further this winter when they embark on a stadium tour of the UK and Europe with the Arctic Monkeys, taking in some of the continent’s premiere venues.

‘Snapshot’ – an electrifying collage of The Strypes’ own material and some of the much-loved throwback covers that pepper their live sets – is now available.

The Strypes Band
  • The Strypes (16-18 yrs-old) are 4-piece rhythm and blues band hailing from Cavan, Ireland, formed in 2011 by Ross Farrelly (lead vocals/harmonica), Josh McClorey (lead guitar/vocals), Pete O’Hanlon (bass guitar/harmonica) and Evan Walsh (drums).

    The group has spent the past 18 months launching their explosive R&B assault on the clubs and festivals of Ireland, the UK and Europe, viciously hammering out a no-nonsense blues repertoire drawing from the songbooks of Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, Howlin’ Wolf, Little Walter, Slim Harpo and more with the passion and venom of British blues groups such as Dr. Feelgood, The Yardbirds, The Rolling Stones and The Animals.

    Having already been met with critical acclaim from greats such as Jeff Beck and Paul Weller and been tipped by NME as the No. 1 new band to watch, it seems things can only get better for The Strypes.

Nominations: UK Festival Award for Best Breakthrough Act

Irish Band The Strypes don’t take succes for granted – Interview

The Strypes interview – Josh and Ross (part 1)


Published on Sep 25, 2013
Josh and Ross about quitting school, writing their own songs, Blue Collar Jane, Snapshot, capturing the live energy, working with Chris Thomas, admiration, the future.
 
 

The Strypes interview – Josh and Ross (part 2)

 
 

We complain about the state of the charts and how all pop music has become pointless drivel spewed out by talentless, money grabbing twats – who only see music as a means of profit and not as art.

But when a young (lest we forget they are 15 and 16 year olds – I doubt Lennon was doing anything particularly ground breaking at that age) group of talented musicians who seem to have a genuine interest in music come along all anyone can seem to do is attack them.

The rat pack of the music industry have been salivating and doing their weasel weiner dance (insert Redfoo from LMFAO’s “wiggle dance”) over Haim, a group that seem more interested in being interviewed, playing festivals and hanging with celebrities than writing good fucking songs. It took them eight years to release an album with only four new songs written by other people!

The Strypes are an Irish four-piece rock ‘n’ roll band from Cavan, Ireland, formed in 2008 consisting of Ross Farrelly (lead vocals/harmonica), Josh McClorey (lead guitar/vocals), Pete O’Hanlon (bass guitar/harmonica) and Evan Walsh (drums). The band played the local scene with various members switching parts as they searched for their sound. They draw inspiration from 60’s blues boom and 70’s pub rock bands such as Dr. Feelgood, Eddie and the Hot Rods, The Rolling Stones, The Yardbirds, Lew Lewis and Rockpile as well as the original bluesmen and rock ‘n’ roll artists such as Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, Howlin’ Wolf and Little Walter, among others. The band members’ current ages are 16 to 18 years.