AN ANALYSIS WORTH READING

 

BY DICK HARRIS, FORMER POLITICAL ADVISOR TO PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON

If you happen to see Bill Clinton’s five minute TV ad for Hillary in which he introduces the commercial by saying that he wants to share with some things we may not know about Hillary’s background…

Best beware, as I was there for most of their presidency and know them better than just about anyone, I offer a few corrections;

BILL SAYS: “In law school Hillary worked on legal services for the poor.”

THE FACTS ARE: Hillary’s main extra-curricular activity in law school was helping the Black Panthers, on trial in Connecticut for torturing and killing a federal agent. She went to court every day as part of a law student monitoring committee trying to spot civil rights violations and develop grounds for appeal.

BILL SAYS: “Hillary could have written her own job ticket, but she turneddown all the lucrative offers.”

THE FACTS ARE: She flunked the DC bar exam, yes, flunked. it is a matter of record, and only passed the Arkansas bar. She had no job offers in Arkansas, none, and only got hired by the University of Arkansas Law School at Fayetteville because Bill was already teaching there. She did not join the prestigious Rose Law Firm until Bill became Arkansas Attorney General and was made a partner only after he was elected Arkansas Governor.

BILL SAYS: “President Carter appointed Hillary to the Legal Services Board of Directors and she became its chairman.”

THE FACTS ARE: The appointment was in exchange for Bill’s support for Carter in his 1980 primary against Ted Kennedy. Hillary then became chairman in a coup in which she won a majority away from Carter’s choice to be chairman.

BILL SAYS: “She served on the board of the Arkansas Children’s Hospital.”

THE FACTS ARE: Yes, she did. But her main board activity, not mentioned by Bill, was to sit on the Walmart board of directors, for a substantial fee. She was silent about their labor and health care practices.

BILL SAYS: “Hillary didn’t succeed at GEtting health care for all Americans in 1994 but she kept working at it and helped to create the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) that provides five million children with health insurance.

THE FACTS ARE:  Hillary had nothing to do with creating CHIP. It was included in the budget deal between Clinton and Republican Majority Leader Senator Trent Lott. I know I was there; I helped to negotiate the deal. The money came half from the budget deal and half from the Attorney Generals’ tobacco settlement.  Hilarry had nothing to do with either source off funds.

BILL SAYS: “Hillary was the face of America all over the world.”

THE FACTS ARE: Her visits were part of a program to get her out of town so that Bill would not appear weak by feeding stories that Hillary was running the White House. Her visits abroad were entirely touristic and symbolic and there was no substance on any of them.

BILL SAYS: “Hillary was an excellent Senator who kept fighting for children’s and women’s issues.”

THE FACTS ARE: Other than totally meaningless legislation like changing the names on court houses and post offices, she has passed only four substantive pieces of legislation. One set up a national Part in Puerto Rico. A second provided respite care for family members helping their relatives through Alzheimer’s or other conditions. And two were routine by the entire NY delegation.  Presently she is trying to have the U.S. memorialize the Woodstock fiasco of 40 years ago.

Here is what bothers me more than anything. else about Hillary Clinton. She has done everything possible to weaken the President and our country (that’s you and me!) when it comes to the war on terror.

  1. She wants to close GITMO and move the combatants to the USA where they would have access to our legal system.
  2. She wants to eliminate the monitoring of suspected Al Qaeda phone calls to and from the USA.
  3.  She wants to grant constitutional rights to enemy combatants captured on the battlefied.
  4.  She wants to eliminate the monitoring of money transfers between suspected Al Qaeda cells and supporters in the USA.
  5.  She wants to eliminate the type of interrogation tactics used by the military and CIA where coercion might be used when questioning known terrorists even though such tactics might save American lives.

One cannot think of a single bill Hillary Clinton introduced or a single comment she has made that would tend to strengthen our country in the War on Terror.

But, one can think of a lot of comments she has made to weaken our country and makes it a more dangerous situation for all of us.

Bottom line:  She goes hand in hand with the ACLUon far too many issues where common sense is abandoned.

Both have American blood on their hands.

She’s simply not a nice person.

 

Published by Ainhoa Aristizabal – Editor of Unruly Hearts

 

 

The New York Times: Bernie Sanders’s Win in Michigan Changes Race but Not Probabilities

 

The New York Times

Excerpts from Mr Cohn’s article

Bernie Sanders managed to defeat Hillary Clinton by two percentage points in Michigan on Tuesday night, even though he trailed by at least 11 percentage points in every survey, and even though the demographics pointed toward a significant, if relatively smaller, advantage for Mrs. Clinton.

Mr. Sanders’s win is so surprising that it’s hard to know what to make of it. Are we learning, for the first time, of a big latent advantage in the Rust Belt? Was it a fluke?

Yet one thing is clear: Mrs. Clinton still has a significant advantage nationwide. Her delegate lead is so solid that she would continue to win, even if Mr. Sanders’s ability to defy expectations the way he did in Michigan became a trend.

 

 

Bernie has already won the future of the Democratic Party

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Bernie Sanders You are our hope!

 

As the Democratic presidential contest reaches the third state, what began as a coronation is now an exciting dead heat. Yet by one measure, Bernie Sanders is ­already a clear winner.

Regardless of whether the senator from Vermont captures the actual nomination, he has won the future of the Democratic Party.

Sanders is demolishing the last remnants of the old order, as represented by Hillary Clinton and her split-the-difference triangulation. It is Sanders, not she, who is the true heir of the radical politics of Barack Obama.

Calling a paradigm shift is like forecasting a recession — predict it often enough and you’ll eventually be right. Yet the developments unfolding before our eyes suggest the Democratic Party is undergoing a massive change. And a 74-year-old socialist is the architect.

A major piece of evidence is the enormous youth vote he attracts. In Iowa and New Hampshire, he beat Clinton by about 70 points — 84 percent to 15 percent — among voters under age 30. And despite the nasty demands by Madeleine Albright and Gloria Steinem that women must support Clinton, Sanders got 82 percent of the young female vote.

By contrast, Obama in the 2008 primaries typically beat Clinton among young people by about 20 points. With studies showing that most people stay in their first political party for many years, the young, ultra-liberal voters who turned out for Obama, and who are being joined by the Sanders wave, could dominate the party for a generation.

The implications are huge. Sanders’ call for a single-payer health-care system is a fantasy now, but it will outlive the campaign. His call for tuition-free public colleges won’t be forgotten, nor will his demands for enormous tax hikes on upper incomes. They’ll all be back as platform planks no matter what happens this year.

A second piece of evidence about Sanders’ impact is the way Clinton is jettisoning her incremental approach and embracing his anti-Wall Street, populist agenda. She’s calling herself a “progressive,” a word no one ever used to describe her, while also insisting that she is better able to get things done.

It would be an understatement to say the approach needs work. In New Hampshire, she urged voters to “bring both your heart and your head” on primary day — and promptly lost by 21 points.

There is, of course, an irrational dimension to the Sanders phenomenon. Obama is the most far-left president in memory, with his liberalism mixing higher taxes, an explosion of regulations and an expansion of social programs with a weak foreign policy.

The results everywhere are ­awful: The economy never fully recovered from the recession, and looks ready to slip back again. The world Obama tried to withdraw from is on fire, with talk of a global war growing louder.

America doesn’t need a double dose of the same bad medicine, but that is what young Democrats want. They believe Obama has been too moderate and see Clinton as even more old-school.

The party made this mistake before. After Lyndon Johnson ushered in the Great Society, a new generation furious about Vietnam pushed him aside for successors who were radicals at home and doves abroad.

Fortunately, most did not win the White House. Hubert Humphrey and George McGovern were rejected by voters, and Jimmy Carter probably would have been, too, were it not for the backlash over Watergate. After Carter’s disastrous term, the GOP won the next three thanks to Ronald Reagan’s pro-growth agenda and muscular foreign ­policy.

Dems won four of the last six elections, but Obama overplayed his hand. He scoffed at the center-left policies of Bill Clinton, and forfeited both houses of Congress. Now Sanders is going further by trashing the Clinton era in much the same way LBJ was trashed. He’s also daring to say Obama is not progressive enough.

Hillary is caught between Obama and Sanders, and, with the FBI probing her secret server and other issues, is under a cloud. ­Because of her trust deficit among voters, Sanders has more enthusiastic supporters.

Her message makeover is telling. Clinton initially hoped to build on her husband’s “third way” compromise between left and right, but no longer. Wall Street has gone from her piggy bank to her piñata.

Her husband, regarded affectionately by many African-Americans as the nation’s first black president, finds his welfare and criminal-justice record the target of angry young liberals. To save herself, Hillary last week discovered “systemic racism” in ­America.

Even if Sanders does not become president, the movement he unleashed is here to stay. So buckle up, America, the Dems are taking another hard left turn.

There’s a Rikers for a reason

City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito is on a mission to decriminalize many quality-of-life crimes, and hopes to close Rikers Island.

Her proposals are long on sympathy for people caught up in the criminal-justice system, but fall short on sympathy for the victims of the criminals she’s slobbering over. To her, only cops are bad.

Mark-Viverito, who engineered a raise for herself, from $137,192 to $164,500, is pushing legislation to wipe off the books 700,000 outstanding warrants for offenders who didn’t show up for court. They got initial summonses for urinating in public, breaking park rules, idling a vehicle, creating unreasonable noise or littering.

She called the move a continuing “quest for reform,” which might be true if the goal wasn’t a wholesale whitewashing of misdeeds.

Similarly, in her bid to close Rikers, she sounds as if the complex is another Abu Ghraib, the infamous Baghdad prison where American soldiers abused Iraqi detainees.

Top cop Bill Bratton negotiated with Mark-Viverito over her plans to stop many low-level arrests, and instead issue warnings. Bratton’s bottom line is that cops must retain the discretion to make arrests when they judge that appropriate.

In theory, that keeps a key policing tool intact. But cops already complain that City Hall undermines them, and the fear is that political pressure not to make arrests will lead the police to pull back on enforcement, as they have in other cities.

Gosh, ya think so?

Round up the usual denials. That was law enforcement’s first reaction when a Somali man named Mohamed Barry used a machete to slash four customers at an Israeli restaurant in Columbus, Ohio.

“There’s nothing to lead us to believe this is anything more than a random attack,” a police spokesman quickly told a local paper.

“Random.” That’s what Obama said about the slaughter of four Jews by a Muslim in a kosher market in Paris. “Random.”

Thankfully, the FBI soon took over the Ohio case and suggested terrorism was the motive. No kidding.

The one place they like Mike

Reader Ray Arroyo answers my challenge to identify a single state that Michael Bloomberg could win in a presidential bid. Referencing the former mayor’s campaigns against butter, salt and sugar, he writes:

“Bloomy wins the Nanny State…by a landslide!”

 

BERNIE SANDERS, THE EARLY YEARS

 

 

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“Everybody knows what’s happening — who wants to know,” Bernie Sanders wrote in June 1972 in Movement, an irregular Liberty Union Party newsletter he edited. “A handful of people own almost everything … and almost everybody owns nothing. A handful of people make the decisions and the vast majority of people have virtually no control over their lives.” Dating all the way back to the 1960s and ‘70s in Vermont, a formative time for Sanders, the message of the surging socialist presidential candidate has been startling consistent. “The rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer, and the vast majority in the middle are having a harder and harder time,” he said — in 1974, and ever since.

Above, 1963: Economic justice has been the central focus of Sanders’ 40-plus-year political career—as a young activist at the University of Chicago, though, Sanders agitated more for racial equality. In 1963 he was arrested during a demonstration protesting the city’s segregated schools. He also traveled to Washington—his first time in D.C.—to hear Martin Luther King speak at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

The Washington Post

“A Special Place in Hell”… For Hillary Clinton and Madeleine Albright?

By Gloria La Riva
Global Research, February 09, 2016
Liberation 7 February 2016
Region: USA
Theme: Crimes against Humanity, US NATO War Agenda
In-depth Report: IRAQ REPORT, U.S. Election

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Hillary Clinton screaming…

130612.jpgFeatured image: Albright, a fanatical advocate for genocidal sanctions and bombing campaigns, is in no place to lecture young women on “feminism.”

I am writing as a working woman, feminist, socialist, and candidate for President of the United States, and I want to condemn in the strongest possible terms the outlandish attacks by Hillary Clinton and Madeleine Albright on any woman working in support of the political campaign of Bernie Sanders. This attack, particularly on young women who are supporting Sanders in such large numbers, is a shameful and opportunist attempt to use the historic struggle for women’s rights for the narrowest political gains.

In a desperate attempt to reverse the growing support among young women and men for her opponent in the Democratic Party primaries, Hillary Clinton has enlisted the support of notorious war monger and advocate of mass murder, Madeleine Albright.

As Clinton looked on laughing and clapping, Albright told the media on February 6: “There’s a special place in hell for women who don’t help each other!”

If indeed there were such a “special place,” Madeleine Albright would most assuredly be going. And going along with her would be candidate Clinton.

As UN Ambassador and the Secretary of State in the Bill Clinton regime, Albright was a fanatical advocate of the genocidal sanctions blockade that killed more than a million women, children and men in Iraq, and of the 1999 U.S./NATO bombing war against Yugoslavia.

On May 12, 1996, nearly six years into the U.S./UN sanctions, Albright was interviewed on CBS “60 Minutes” by Lesley Stahl, who had just returned from Iraq, about the impact on the Iraqi population:

Lesley Stahl: “We have heard that a half million children have died. I mean, that’s more children than died in Hiroshima. And, you know, is the price worth it?”

U.S. Ambassador to the UN Madeleine Albright: “I think this is a very hard choice, but the price–we think the price is worth it.”

Albright’s astoundingly flippant answer was nothing less than a confession to one of the most horrific war crimes in history, indicting not just herself but all the leaders of the Bush I, Clinton and Bush II administrations who were fully aware of the lethal impact of sanctions on the people of Iraq.

In 1999, Albright played a key role in the war on Yugoslavia, engineering the failure of the negotiations that preceded the war. Albright presented the Yugoslav government with an “agreement” that would have allowed NATO to forces to occupy the entire country, with the unheard of provision that Yugoslavia would pay for the expenses of the occupation!

After the talks broke off, a “top official” (Albright) told reporters in an off-the-record session: “We intentionally set the bar too high for the Serbs to comply. They need some bombing, and that’s what they are going to get.” When the Yugoslav government predictably rejected the ultimatum disguised as a “proposal,” the bombing began and continued for three months.

Thousands of civilians were killed, wounded and made homeless. As was true in Iraq, the entire population was traumatized, with women and children most severely impacted.

Like the assault on Iraq, the attack on Yugoslavia was a war crime, a “crime against peace,” the most serious of all violations of international law, a war of aggression against another state that poses no threat to the country launching the war.

According to her own words, Hillary Clinton joined in the war chorus: “I urged him [President Clinton] to bomb.”

In 2003, Senator Clinton supported invasion and occupation of Iraq. In 2011, as Secretary of State, she was chief advocate in the Obama administration in calling for the bombing war that killed, wounded and displaced unknown numbers of Libyans and devastated the country.

After the torture and murder of Libyan leader Moammar Qaddafi, Clinton laughingly told a CBS interviewer: “We came, we saw, he died.”

Albright and Clinton thus share much in common both with each other and their far more numerous murderous male counterparts in the top levels of the U.S. imperialist state machine. That they who have worked to destroy the lives of so many millions of women would now presume to lecture young women on “feminism” and attempt to shame them into supporting Clinton is a despicable travesty.
The original source of this article is Liberation

Copyright © Gloria La Riva, Liberation, 2016

Disclaimer: The contents of this article are of sole responsibility of the author(s).  Unruly Hearts will not be responsible for any inaccurate or incorrect statement in this article.

Bernie Sanders’ Political Revolution

The candidate on challenging Hillary, taking on the one percent, and why he believes his radical campaign will prevail

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“Our goal should be a society in which all people have a decent standard of living,” says Sanders. Win McNamee/Getty Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/bernie-sanders-political-revolution-20151118#ixzz3u3PBEJaQ

vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders – just plain “Bernie” to his backers – is the unlikeliest of political sensations. The self-styled “democratic socialist” has packed arenas and meeting halls from Seattle to L.A. to Atlanta, drawing nearly 400,000 supporters to his rallies. Decrying a “rigged” economy and a political system corrupted by billionaires, Sanders has refused Super PAC politics, instead drawing on 750,000 grassroots donors. On the strength of $30-average checks, he has built a campaign war chest to rival the Hillary Clinton juggernaut.

 

1035x1407-R1249_cover_BernieSanders has already altered the course of the 2016 campaign. His resonance with the Democratic Party’s activist base has forced Clinton to tack left, repeatedly. But don’t mistake this as Sanders’ endgame. “Bernie’s campaign is more than symbolic – it’s real, and it can succeed,” says senior adviser Tad Devine, a veteran of Al Gore’s 2000 bid. The Sanders machine is built to slingshot to an early lead, propelled by grassroots excitement in Iowa and New Hampshire, and then to fight, delegate by delegate, all the way to the convention. And recent polls counter the notion that Sanders is “unelectable.” An October NBC News/Wall Street Journal survey shows Sanders besting Donald Trump by nine points, Marco Rubio by five.

Sanders has a unique ability to drive turnout among “lower-income working whites,” Devine insists. But an October National Student Town Hall at George Mason University – a public school in leafy Fairfax, Virginia – suggests a far broader resonance. Sixteen hundred roaring students pack the volleyball stadium to the rafters. The audience is startlingly diverse: African-American and African immigrant, Hispanic, Asian, Middle Eastern, white, preppy, hipster, jock and dreadlocked. Kianoosh Asar, a 22-year-old Iranian immigrant, wears a homemade T-shirt that reads “CAUTION THE POLLS MAY CAUSE SERIOUS BERN.” For Asar, Sanders’ substance is the selling point: “I really care about all the issues,” he says. “And I care about a candidate who talks for my generation.” That Sanders would be 75 on Inauguration Day doesn’t even seem to register.

Rolling Stone spent three days on the campaign trail with Sanders in May.

The town hall is intimate in physical scale, but expansive in virtual reach: simulcast to watch-parties in all 50 states at campuses as unexpected as Mississippi State. Sanders’ stump speech is heavy on facts – about wealth inequality, marijuana arrest rates, young-voter turnout – and short on rhetorical lift. But amid the fierce statistical urgency of his pitch, a moment of raw emotional power emerges. A Sudanese-American student who wears a blue hijab, pinned with a Bernie 2016 button, asks Sanders how he can counter Trump and Ben Carson “bashing Muslims.” Sanders motions the student, Remaz Abdelgader, up to the stage, pulling her into a hug. “Let me be very personal,” he says. “My father’s family died in concentration camps.” The tableau of a bald white Jew from Vermont embracing a young black Muslim woman to denounce America’s “ugly stain of racism” has the audience fighting back tears. After the rally, Abdelgader, an aspiring human rights lawyer, is euphoric, declaring without a trace of irony, “I feel like he’s my Jewish dad.”

Rolling Stone met with Sanders over two afternoons in his Senate offices. His waiting room features a life-size cutout of a black-and-white cow. His personal office is stately, if cluttered. By the window hangs a plaque honoring Eugene V. Debs, the union leader and Socialist politician who ran for president in 1920 while serving time in prison for his opposition to World War I.

Sanders has no pretension to presidential pomp. Tossing off his suit jacket, leaving it rumpled on the couch beside him, he dons a sky-blue Burlington College fleece and kicks rubber-soled shoes up on his coffee table, next to a copy of Robert Reich’s new book, Saving Capitalism. Sanders engages like a college professor in a bull session. As he reaches deep for an idea, his eyes dart back and forth like a metronome behind bifocals. His demeanor is harried; the competing demands of his campaign and Senate schedule would be grueling for a politician half his age. But nothing clouds Sanders’ thinking or dulls his off-kilter wit. At the conclusion of our interview he’s due to meet with representatives of the Syrian opposition forces – who he jokes are “probably gonna break in here and shoot” if we don’t wrap on schedule.

What made you, personally, decide to run for president?
I am the longest-serving Independent in the history of the United States Congress. In 1990, I was the first democratic socialist elected in 40 years. So my path is a very unusual political path. I never believed that I would ever become a mayor, a congressman or a United States senator. And I can assure you from the depth of my heart that when I grew up in a three-and-a-half-room apartment in Brooklyn, New York – a rent-controlled apartment – that no one ever thought, or I ever thought, I would become president of the United States. I am not running to fulfill some long-held ambition. I am running for one simple reason: This country today is facing extraordinary crises in terms of climate change, income and wealth inequality; in terms of a political system which is now corrupt and is leading us toward oligarchy; in terms of the collapse of the American middle class; in terms of more people in jail than any other country on Earth; and in terms of an immigration policy which is clearly completely broken. I just do not believe that establishment politics are going to address these issues.

Does that get to the core of why you believe Democrats should vote for you instead of Hillary Clinton?
In this particular moment in American history, where a small number of extraordinarily wealthy people increasingly control our economic and political life, what Democrats have to determine is which candidate is best prepared to take on and defeat these powerful special interests and revitalize American democracy so that government works for all of us, not just the large campaign contributors.

I say with utmost sincerity: I have known Hillary Clinton for 25 years. I knew her as first lady. We’re not best friends, ya know, but I know her. She is a very impressive woman, very intelligent and has a huge amount of experience. Nobody denies, Hillary Clinton least of all, that she is an establishment candidate. You can’t go around the country touting all the governors and senators and people who support you without acknowledging that you are the candidate of the establishment. Hillary Clinton has a Super PAC, which will raise money from a whole lot of wealthy individuals and corporate interests. That’s just the way it is.

I do not say, “Elect Bernie Sanders for president, I’m going to solve all of these problems.” We need millions of people to stand up and fight back, to demand that government represents all of us, not just the one percent. I’m trying to create a movement. That is what my campaign is about – that is not what Hillary Clinton’s establishment campaign is about.

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Sanders at a rally in Boston. Charlie Mahoney/The NY Times/Redux Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/bernie-sanders-political-revolution-20151118#ixzz3u3Qnxut9

You have called the explosion of wealth and income inequality “the great moral, economic and political issue of our time.” What’s at stake if we don’t fix this?
The Koch brothers and their friends will be spending more money on this campaign than either the Democratic Party or the Republican Party – just one family. That is oligarchy, and that will only get worse.

To address America’s economic imbalance, you’re proposing a platform of democratic socialism – what does that mean to you?
Our goal should be a society in which all people have a decent standard of living, not a society in which a few people have incredible wealth while 47 million live in poverty. What it means to me in English is a national health care program that guarantees health care to all people. It means high-quality public education from preschool through graduate school – and one of the important points of the platform that we’re running on is to make public colleges and universities tuition-free. Anybody in this country, regardless of their income, should be able to go get a higher education.

It means dealing with the fact that significant numbers of people in this country are paying a very large proportion of their incomes in housing. It means that if you’re gonna work 40 hours a week, you don’t live in poverty; that we raise the minimum wage to a living wage.

Look, nobody knows the magic formula to happiness. But if you have economic security, your life is a lot better than people who are struggling every single day. And I want to create that type of economic security in America.

You have a plaque of the Socialist political leader Eugene V. Debs on your wall. You have called him “one of the important heroes of American history.” In 1979, you even recorded a documentary of Debs…
And I would probably be doing videos like that today if I hadn’t become mayor of Burlington by 10 votes. I would have done a series, not just on Debs but other radicals that no one in America has heard of – I doubt that 10 percent of the American people know who Debs was, OK? And it’s important that people know what he stood for, and the struggles that were going on in the early part of the 20th century.

In the documentary, you voice the part of Debs – re-enacting his famous speeches. Some of the language is pretty hot by today’s standards. It’s jarring to hear his words in your voice, talking about wage earners as “slaves” oppressed by “some capitalist parasite,” calling on workers to fulfill their “great historic mission” to “overthrow the capitalist system.”
Those were Debs’ [words]. You’re not quoting me as saying those things.

But people can go on the Internet and hear you say those things.
Yeah.

Did that reflect your thinking in 1979, at the dawn of the Reagan era?
No. The essence of what he was talking about [was] trying to create a society where all people had a decent standard of living rather than the types of massive exploitation and inequality which he saw in his time, and which is here today. It looks different: Children are not working in factories and they’re not working in the fields, but you have millions of families today who do not know how they’re gonna feed their kids tonight. That’s a fact. So many of these problems remain, maybe not as severe. But his vision is a vision that I share.

Including an “overthrow of the capitalist system”?
No, no, no. Now you’re being provocative. If you follow my campaign, have you heard me talk about overthrowing the capitalist economic system?

No, I haven’t.
OK. What I do talk about is a political revolution. We had an election last November in which 63 percent of the people didn’t vote; 80 percent of young people didn’t vote. That’s, to me, not a democratic system. So what we have got to do is not only overturn Citizens United, but we have got to move, in my view, to public funding of elections. We have to pass universal legislation that makes everybody in this country who is 18 or older eligible to vote, so we do away with the Republican voter suppression around the country.

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/bernie-sanders-political-revolution-20151118#ixzz3u3RDyTUu
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You’ve had a front-row seat for the gridlock here in D.C. dogging President Obama. What chance do you see of getting your agenda through Congress?
If we win this election, it will have said that the political revolution is moving forward. In other words: I will not get elected unless there is a huge increase in voter turnout. That’s a simple fact. And I will not get elected unless there are a lot of working-class people, who have turned their backs on the political system, now getting engaged in the system. Young people now getting engaged. And I will not get elected unless there is a significant increase in public consciousness.

The Republicans get away with murder. They cast horrendous votes with the full expectation that most Americans don’t know what they’re doing. If I am elected president, the American people will know what [Republicans] are doing. And here’s the good news: The Republican agenda is a very unpopular agenda.

If people really understand what goes on here in Washington, and the power of big money and the power of corporate America and the power of Wall Street, then we will be able to get that agenda through.

How would you keep your supporters involved from the Oval Office?
Look, politicians respond. If the people are asleep and not involved, they respond to the lobbyists and donors. But when people speak up and fight, if you want to survive [as a politician], you have to respond. My job is to activate people to fight for their rights and to force Congress to respond to the needs of working families.

What the president can do is to say to the American people, “OK, if you think that it is important that public colleges and universities are tuition-free, and that that program be paid for based on a tax on Wall Street speculation, well, on March 15th there is going to be a vote in the House, and let’s see if we can bring large numbers of people here to Washington to say hello to members of Congress. Let us make every member of Congress aware that millions of people are involved in this issue. They know how you are going to vote.” Of course we’ll win that.

Sanders, speaking to Rolling Stone in May, discusses why he believes personality is not the most important factor in a campaign.

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/see-bernie-sanders-rap-in-dj-steve-porters-bern-it-up-video-remix-20151103 – Watch video here

Bernie Sanders and his supporters are confident that the Senator from Vermont is well qualified to serve as Commander in Chief, but does he have what it takes to be a hip-hop star? Video-remix specialist DJ Steve Porter seems to think so, judging from his latest Rolling Stone exclusive supercut. Porter, who knows a little something about hip-hop – he recently helped us celebrate Eminem’s birthday with his “Shady Birthday” remix – cleverly stitched together snippets of Sanders speeches to create a surprisingly catchy rap track called “Bern It Up.”

Yet despite the style of the song, Porter thinks that Sanders embodies the spirit of a different musical genre altogether: “Bernie is an absolute heavy-metal rock star,” he enthuses, “and his middle-class message deserved an anthem. Hopefully ‘Bern It Up’ is it!” Check it out above.

You’ve had a front-row seat for the gridlock here in D.C. dogging President Obama. What chance do you see of getting your agenda through Congress?
If we win this election, it will have said that the political revolution is moving forward. In other words: I will not get elected unless there is a huge increase in voter turnout. That’s a simple fact. And I will not get elected unless there are a lot of working-class people, who have turned their backs on the political system, now getting engaged in the system. Young people now getting engaged. And I will not get elected unless there is a significant increase in public consciousness.

The Republicans get away with murder. They cast horrendous votes with the full expectation that most Americans don’t know what they’re doing. If I am elected president, the American people will know what [Republicans] are doing. And here’s the good news: The Republican agenda is a very unpopular agenda.

If people really understand what goes on here in Washington, and the power of big money and the power of corporate America and the power of Wall Street, then we will be able to get that agenda through.

How would you keep your supporters involved from the Oval Office?
Look, politicians respond. If the people are asleep and not involved, they respond to the lobbyists and donors. But when people speak up and fight, if you want to survive [as a politician], you have to respond. My job is to activate people to fight for their rights and to force Congress to respond to the needs of working families.

What the president can do is to say to the American people, “OK, if you think that it is important that public colleges and universities are tuition-free, and that that program be paid for based on a tax on Wall Street speculation, well, on March 15th there is going to be a vote in the House, and let’s see if we can bring large numbers of people here to Washington to say hello to members of Congress. Let us make every member of Congress aware that millions of people are involved in this issue. They know how you are going to vote.” Of course we’ll win that.

Sanders, speaking to Rolling Stone in May, discusses why he believes personality is not the most important factor in a campaign.

“FIRST DEMOCRATIC DEBATE HIGHLIGHTS: 2015” —- A Bad Lip Reading of the First Democratic Debate – Madame Clinton fakes being “happy”.