Lineup Announced for Brooklyn’s Northside Festival 2013

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Northside Festival is Brooklyn’s Williamsburg-Greenpoint based love-in for independent musicians, filmmakers and artists celebrating the best of our city.  This year the festival runs from June 13 to 20 and is expected to attract more than 80,000 people

The New York Times announced yesterday that The Walkmen, Black Flag and Merchandise will be among about 350 bands that will play at this year’s festival, as organizers have added two free outdoor concerts and an expo to the weeklong schedule.

Now in its fifth year, Northside has become Brooklyn’s answer to the better-known South by Southwest Festival in Austin, Tex., a three-pronged event featuring an indie film festival and a music festival.   “South by Southwest should be shaking in its boots, because the Northside Festival is the new sheriff in town,” the Brooklyn borough president, Marty Markowitz, said.

The organizers, Daniel and Scott Stedman, founders of the Northside Media Group, said they would  produce two free public concerts on June 15 and 16 in McCarren Park as part of this year’s event. The Walkmen will anchor the first show; a headliner for the second has yet to be announced.

“We are now at a scale where we can make it a massive event and have a lot of the programming be free to the public,” Scott Stedman said.

The list is also heavy with young rock bands that generated buzz at the CMJ Music Marathon last fall and at  South by Southwest in March, among them Merchandise, Milk Music and Mac DeMarco. Others scheduled to perform include Swans, Lambchop, Torche, the Men, White Fence and Iceage.

The film festival  will feature several New York premieres, including “All the Light in the Sky,” a 2012 film about about an aging actress directed by Joe Swanberg, and “A Teacher,” about a teacher who has an affair with a student, directed by Hannah Fidell.

Watch The Walkmen Do “Heartbreaker” On David Letterman Show
The Brooklym-based The Walkmen continue their tour of the world and beyond, and they brought the Heaven cut “Heartbreaker” to The Late Show With David Letterman. Letterman had a skateboarding goat on the show earlier, so the group had a tough act to follow (“Let’s see if these guys can skateboard” is how Letterman introduced the band). Still, “Heartbreaker” remains heartbreakingly beautiful, especially in the live setting, and this night’s renditions sounded a bit more rock-and-roll than the past. Also, lead singer Hamilton Leithauser is taller than the notoriously tall Letterman, so there’s that. Watch the fun below.

While others have Paris and Rome, we’ll always have Brooklyn.

The Grand Army Plaza – Brooklyn, NYC

While others have Paris and Rome, we’ll always have Brooklyn. But justifiable pride of place should not make us reluctant to look deeper and examine serious challenges to Brooklyn’s well being. ~ Marilyn Gelber

There’s no shortage of pride in Brooklyn. Whether you’re a fan of pizza from Di Fara’s, Spumoni Gardens, Roberta’s or Lucali’s; or you claim to know where to find the very best taco and dim sum in Sunset Park, the next big music act out of Bushwick or Williamsburg, or the block in Dyker Heights with the most stunning Christmas lights—it’s pride in the vitality and character of our communities, their rich history, the perfect scale and look of our old buildings and the sharp elbows of the new ones, which adds up to the always fascinating and seldom dull landscape of 70 distinct neighborhoods that is Brooklyn.

While others have Paris and Rome, we’ll always have Brooklyn — a borough of bridges, brownstones, and boardwalks; a home with endless wonders to explore, just a walk or subway ride away.

But justifiable pride of place should not make us reluctant to look deeper and examine serious challenges to Brooklyn’s well being.

While Brooklyn is booming—rapidly rivaling our neighbor across the river as the place to live and work—it’s still home to sky -high poverty rates, too many low-performing schools, under resourced public housing developments, shaky health facilities, young people out of school and out of work, and a tragically large number of seniors barely getting by.

When we launched the Brooklyn Community Foundation just over two years ago, we wanted to be a force for good. We wanted to bring resources and ideas to strengthen communities and engage Brooklynites in giving and service to others. But we knew that in order to do this we needed to help Brooklynites look through a more accurate lens on issues and trends in the borough to help us all be more deeply informed about the place we live: what’s affecting our neighborhood schools, how local businesses are faring in this economy, and how are decisions being made about future development. Francis Bacon was right: Nam et ipsa scientia potestas est. Knowledge is power.

So our sights were set on generating more easily accessible local information—data, reporting, analysis—to empower Brooklynites to get active and be part of making Brooklyn better for all who live here.

To lay the groundwork for an information renaissance in Brooklyn, we took two major steps. First, we funded and created the Center for the Study of Brooklyn at Brooklyn College, a research institute solely focused on Brooklyn. Second, we teamed up with City Limits to get a grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation to build the Brooklyn Bureau, a new source of serious investigative journalism for all of Brooklyn.

Right now in the media there are two Brooklyns: the Brooklyn of artisanal cheese shops and the Brooklyn of murder and mayhem.

While we love that there’s no shortage of ink on how “cool” Brooklyn is, there’s an egregious lack of reporting dedicated to civic and social issues in what would be the nation’s fourth largest city. We’re not comfortable with the idea of Brooklyn being split apart by income disparity and selective investment, and the general media paying attention to just a sliver of what’s happening here.

We need to hold everyone to a higher standard. And the Brooklyn Bureau, with its dedication to investigating local issues particularly in underserved communities across our borough, is a key part of our work to do that.

While City Limits’ reporters are canvassing Brooklyn for untold stories and new perspectives, researchers at the Center for the Study of Brooklyn at Brooklyn College are completing work on a series of Neighborhood Profiles for each of Brooklyn’s 18 Community Districts. These information-rich profiles look at key civic indicators over the past decade, so that we can begin to see trends and identify needs across neighborhoods, the borough, and the City.

The Neighborhood Profiles will premiere on the Brooklyn Bureau later this month. In the spring, we will build on this neighborhood-level work to publish the first ever Borough-wide Brooklyn Trends Report, examining the strength of our collective local economy, housing stock, health and healthcare, public safety, education system, environment, and the arts.

We invite you to join us at the Brooklyn Community Foundation as we create a chronicle of 21st century Brooklyn life.

In subsequent columns we’ll take a thorough look at each of Brooklyn’s 18 Community Districts through the lens of City Limits’ reporting, the Center for the Study of Brooklyn’s data analysis, and the Brooklyn Community Foundation’s knowledge of the nonprofit community and key public policy issues.

We hope you’ll accompany us on this journey to explore one of the liveliest, most interesting places on the planet—sometimes referred to as the people’s republic of Brooklyn—and we hope it inspires you to Do Good Right Here.

Brooklyn Is Getting Some Satisfaction From The Rolling Stones!!!

Rolling Stones announce tour date at Brooklyn Barclays Center for Dec. 8

Mick Jagger & the Stones add a concert for their 50th anniversary tour. The UK rockers have two dates set for Newark’s Prudential Center

Mick Jagger of The Rolling Stones performed at a secret club gig on October 25, 2012 in Paris, France. Photo: Dave J Hogan/Getty Images

Monday, November 12, 2012

Brooklyn is going to get some satisfaction!

The Rolling Stones – already slated to play two shows in New Jersey in December – announced Monday that they will add a concert date to their tour at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center on Dec. 8 at 8 p.m.

Rumors swirled that the famed rock ‘n rollers would play a Brooklyn show, and many New York fans were disappointed when the band’s tour dates included only two stops at Newark’s Prudential Center for Dec. 13 and 15.

Tickets for the Brooklyn date go on sale Monday Nov. 19 at 10 a.m. at http://www.rollingstones.com, http://www.ticketmaster.com, and http://www.barclayscenter.com, or can be bought by calling 800-745-3000.

Those who can’t score tickets to see the shows live can watch the Dec. 15 show on HBO in a TV event billed as “One More Shot.”

The legendary UK rockers celebrated their 50th anniversary this year, and have dubbed this micro-tour, “The Stones – 50 and Counting.”

The first, and only other announced, dates on the tour will take place at London’s O1 Arena Nov. 25 and 29.

While the band has announced only five dates so far for 2012, it’s widely speculated that the group will launch a full, international tour in 2013.

The Stones will also telecast their December 15th show, dubbed “One More Shot,” live on pay-per-view at 9 p.m. EST. Their greatest hits collection GRRR! is due tomorrow.

 

The Barclay Center, Brooklyn, NYC

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Is Brooklyn The New Hollywood? Fuhgeddabout L.A.! New York’s a booming mecca for TV and film these days

New York’s Steiner Studios, among the biggest soundstages outside California, could expand significantly in the coming years, according to a report today by Julie Satow in the New York Times.

The studio’s expansion plans could transform its home, the Brooklyn Navy Yard, into one of the major centers of movie production in the country.

The expansion would more than double the size of 8-year-old Steiner Studios, adding 328,000 square feet to the existing 300,000 square feet on the lot with a back lot for shooting New York streetscape-style exteriors, space for media offices, and classrooms for the study of film and entertainment

The project is expected to take 12 years to complete and cost $400 million, $35 million of which is slated to come from New York State and New York City government coffers, pending final approval. The announcement is the latest thrust in the state and city’s campaign to make movie and television production »

New York Is Ready For Its Close-up – The New York Times

Film production Boom in Queens with two studios in high Hollywood demand

New York steals the shows as TV networks look east. Tax breaks are luring an increasing number of producers to shoot on the east coast

Fuhgeddabout L.A.! New York’s a booming mecca for TV and film these days

Steiner Studios, Brooklyn’s Biggest Soundstage, Plans To Expand

Brooklyn Navy Yard, home to the Steiner Studios.

Huff Post – 08/17/2012

New York’s Steiner Studios, among the biggest soundstages outside California, could expand significantly in the coming years, according to a report today by Julie Satow in the New York Times.

The studio’s expansion plans could transform its home, the Brooklyn Navy Yard, into one of the major centers of movie production in the country.

The expansion would more than double the size of 8-year-old Steiner Studios, adding 328,000 square feet to the existing 300,000 square feet on the lot with a back lot for shooting New York streetscape-style exteriors, space for media offices, and classrooms for the study of film and entertainment

The project is expected to take 12 years to complete and cost $400 million, $35 million of which is slated to come from New York State and New York City government coffers, pending final approval. The announcement is the latest thrust in the state and city’s campaign to make movie and television production a central part of the regional economy.

“When Mayor Bloomberg came in, he wanted to diversify the economy and make it rely less on Wall Street,” Marybeth Ihle, press secretary at the New York Mayor’s Office for Media and Entertainment, told The Huffington Post. “We see it as a sector of the economy that offers good jobs. It’s good for other businesses — there are about 4,000 ancillary businesses that rely on film productions, from lumber yards for the construction of sets to fabric shops for costumes.”

The state started offering tax incentives to film productions in 2004; the incentives have since increased several times, most recently in July, when New York tripled its tax-incentives for post-production film work. The past few years have seen many states around the country competing for film productions by cutting taxes — but New York’s rates remain among the lowest in the country.

In terms of attracting productions, the tax breaks seem to have worked. A report by the Boston Consulting Group, released in May, indicated that New York’s filmed entertainment sector grew by 70 percent between 2002 and 2012, and now generates about $7.1 billion a year. Twenty-three television shows were filmed in the city in 2011 and 2012 — up from seven in 2002.

Ihle said that filmmakers are so eager to work in the city that soundstage space has become one of the major limiting factors to such work — even though Steiner is just one of 100 production spaces in the city. As such, she said that Steiner’s expansion is sorely needed.

“We’re almost at capacity in terms of studio space,” she said. “When the pilots were filming earlier this spring, there was a scramble to figure out where they could film.”

Four TV shows, including HBO’s “Girls” and “Boardwalk Empire,” already use Steiner Studios as their home base, and dozens of movies and commercials film there for shorter periods of time. It’s unclear as yet how the expansion will affect overall production capacity; the majority of the space will be dedicated to offices and classrooms. But the Times story said that the plans call for more than 100,000 square feet of new stage space, including the back lot for exteriors and a state-of-the-art underwater studio, presumably in the East River.

Steiner Studios is the largest tenant in the Navy Yard, which was originally opened in 1781 and was the construction site of the first steamship in the U.S. Its tenure as a military manufacturer ended in 1966, but it’s recently been resurrected as a mecca for small-scale light industry in the city.

Barclays Center Brooklyn opens its doors Sept. 28


SEPTEMBER 2012 IS JUST THE BEGINNING – 200 OPENING NIGHTS AND COUNTING….

Jay-Z
Boasting a new 19,000 seat arena and a re-branded team, minority owner Jay-Z has big plans to take on the dominant Madison Square Garden.

The Hollywood Reporter
9/13/2012 by Jordan Zakarin

Boasting a new 19,000 seat arena and a re-branded team, minority owner Jay-Z has big plans to take on the dominant Madison Square Garden.

If you live in New York City, heading to New Jersey is a bit like driving from L.A. into the Valley: You’ve got to have a damned good reason to go — and for years a second-tier team like the New Jersey Nets just didn’t qualify. So the team’s owners set out on a bold course to rejuvenate a failing franchise and, simultaneously, inject some big-league swagger into New York City’s hottest borough (which, according to a recent report, is now the second-most-expensive place to live in the country). And the most visible player in this plan is Brooklyn’s own Jay-Z.

Though he owns just one-fifteenth of one percent of the Brooklyn Nets (Russian billionaire Mikhail Prokhorov owns 80 percent), Jay-Z’s fingerprints are all over the new-look Nets, from their redesigned logo to their newly constructed, 19,000-seat arena in Barclays Center, which opens its doors Sept. 21. “Jay is a partner in the team and is a key contributor regarding the arena,” says Brett Yormark, CEO of the Nets and Barclays Center, which was built on the site of the old Atlantic Rail Yards. The rapper-entrepreneur serves as an ambassador for the team, helping invigorate players like Deron Williams and Kim Kardashian’s ex, Kris Humphries — “It’s been great having him involved because he is Brooklyn,” Humphries told The New York Post after signing a $24 million deal to stay with the Nets — and, perhaps most crucially, he reinforces the team’s connection to Brooklyn, where Jay-Z spent his youth.

Yormark says his minority owner preaches “being real, being true to yourself, being authentic. You can see it in the redesigned, Brooklyn refresh of our logo.” Jay-Z pushed to change the team’s colors to simple black and white and reportedly dictated the music to play during games (favoring artists like Santigold over Jersey favorites like Bon Jovi) — and his credibility is especially important given the team’s largely feeble history.

Though they made it to the NBA Finals in 2002 and 2003, the Nets always have been the second-class ballers in the New York metro area. Last year, the team finished 22-44. But just because the Nets moved to Brooklyn — a pretty massive shift, even in this age of sports teams like the NFL’s Dallas Cowboys spending billions on new stadiums — doesn’t mean Brooklynites will change their stripes. “I wish I had a dollar for every time people ask me that; I could finance another film,” Spike Lee, a Brooklyn native who long has been the Knicks’ most prominent fan, recently said. “I am orange and blue, baby.”

Getting celebrities to sit courtside is a high-value target for any NBA franchise, and while Jay-Z and Beyonce will go a long way, the Nets will have to do better than just Ellen Pompeo and MTV’s Sway (who have bought season tickets) if they’re going to compete with Madison Square Garden — which, for decades, has been the city’s only viable spot for massive concerts and events. MSG also has the advantage of being the home of the Knicks and the WNBA’s Liberty as well as the NHL’s Rangers — and those franchises drove the Garden’s profits to $322 million last quarter.

“Personally, I don’t think the Garden has any reason to consider Barclays as a serious competitor mainly because of the No. 1 rule in New York City real estate: location, location, location,” Alan Hahn, who covered the NBA for Newsday and now is an on-air analyst for MSG’s TV network, told The Hollywood Reporter. “The Garden is in mid-town Manhattan, at the heart of New York City. It’s also the Garden, an icon, a place with rich history and tradition. The Knicks will maintain a more glamorous cachet for now, but, of course, the perception of the franchises certainly can change quickly if the Knicks falter. But the Nets will need to have overwhelming success to really grab the attention – and the loyalty – of the city. Like the Mets in the mid-1980s, for instance.”

Barclays will come out swinging, with eight sold-out Jay-Z shows to open the arena starting Sept. 28 and later dates from Rihanna, Barbra Streisand, Justin Bieber, The Who, Bob Dylan and, reportedly, The Rolling Stones. Barclays will also host boxing matches (an MSG staple) and serve as the New York home of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus. The arena will house a spinoff branch of Jay-Z’s ultra-exclusive 40/40 Club as well as an even more selective, semi-hidden spot: The Vault. Membership includes concierge service and valet parking — one of the 11 Vault suites will run a cool $550,000 a year (Jay-Z already claimed one for himself). And because one can’t actually see the court from the Vault suites, eight tickets to every event at the arena also are included in the deal. (For those without a corporate account or a working mint, Barclays has three other less-restricted clubs.)

“The Garden has been around a long time,” says Yormark. “But we think this city’s big enough for both of us.”

JEWELS OF THE ARENA

The Vault: Discreetly located, these suites come with concierge service and eight tickets in the first 10 rows of every event.

The 40/40 Club: A spinoff of Jay-Z’s famed Manhattan location, this is the premium bar at Barclays Center.

Junior’s Cheesecake: As part of the effort to Brooklynize the arena, there will be 35 iconic borough food vendors throughout, including this NYC institution.

The Barclay Center

The Vault: Discreetly located, these suites come with concierge service and eight tickets in the first 10 rows of every event.

The 40/40 Club: A spinoff of Jay-Z’s famed Manhattan location, this is the premium bar at Barclays Center.