Clinton Had a Very Good Night, but…

The majority of the delegates have yet to be chosen.

Oregon Primary Results
LIVE 3:17:54 PM ET
Republican Primary

Trump has won Oregon, according to A.P.
Candidates Vote Pct. Delegates
Donald Trump 240,804 66.6% 17
Ted Cruz 61,590 17.0 3
John Kasich 59,096 16.3 3

361,490 votes, 93% reporting
Winner called by A.P.

Clinton was low AP reported

Democratic Primary

Sanders has won Oregon, according to A.P.
Candidates Vote Pct. Delegates
Bernie Sanders 320,746 56.0% 34
Hillary Clinton 251,739 44.0 25

572,485 votes, 96% reporting
Winner called by A.P.

Because Oregon does not have voting precincts, the percentage reporting is an A.P. estimate based on the number of early votes.

After the first of this year’s many “Super Tuesdays,” the cover of The Economist magazine featured a staring contest between a blue-faced Hillary Clinton and a red-faced Donald Trump—along with a declaration that “Hillary Clinton will be the Democratic nominee; the man most likely to face her in November on the Republican ticket is Donald Trump.”

That was not quite right in the immediate aftermath of the March 1 “Super Tuesday” primaries and caucuses, when much of the media was angling to shut down unfinished races for the Democratic and Republican presidential nominations. And it seemed even less right as ensuing contests gave victories to the candidates who were still seeking to displace Trump and Clinton—especially after Clinton’s insurgent challenger, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, won an a victory in the March 8 Michigan primary.

The results from the March 15 primaries in five delegate-rich states gave those who see a Clinton-Trump race as inevitable more material to work with.

Trump and Sanders had terrific nights, winning most of the contests on their respective sides of the ballots. Clinton won big in Florida, North Carolina, and Ohio, pulled narrowly ahead in her native Illinois, and was essentially tied with Sanders in Missouri—with 49.6 percent for Clinton to 49.4 for Sanders. Trump did just about as well, winning with ease in Florida, Illinois, and North Carolina, essentially tying in Missouri (with Texas Senator Ted Cruz), and losing to Governor John Kasich in Ohio.

while it is easier now to speculate about a Clinton-Trump contest, that race has not yet begun. The GOP establishment is still trying to trip up Trump, the Bernie Sanders insurgency will continue to challenge Clinton, and Democratic primaries and caucuses will see more upsets of expectations.

“No matter who wins, the center of gravity has fundamentally shifted in the Democratic Party.” —Adam Green, PCCC.

Translation: The 2016 primaries and caucuses on both sides of the partisan aisle have clear front-runners. Those front-runners are in stronger positions than before, and they are training their rhetorical fire on each other. And the races are ongoing.

Republicans understand this; and there is still a good deal of talk about how best to prevent a Trump takeover. Democrats should also understand this; as the majority of the delegates who will decide the identity of the party’s nominee have yet to be chosen.

“Tomorrow, the political establishment will say once again that Bernie can’t win,” said Dan Cantor, the national director of the Working Families Party, which backs Sanders. “That’s nothing new. They’ve been singing that tune since before the primary even started. But every single week, Bernie’s support gets stronger and stronger. Tonight, Bernie’s North Carolina performance was 15 points better than his South Carolina performance last month, and 5 points better than his Virginia performance two weeks ago. This is a close race, and it will be contested in every state. The fact of the matter is that the first half of the primary schedule favored Clinton. The second half will favor Bernie. The only question is whether it will be enough. We intend to do everything we can to make sure it is.”

The contests to come appear to be a good deal friendlier to Sanders, who has strong bases of support in Arizona, Idaho, and Utah (which will vote on March 22) and Alaska, Hawaii, and Washington (which will vote on March 26). And recent polling from Wisconsin, which had its primary April 5, has Sanders narrowly ahead. Beyond the immediate schedule, great big-delegation states such as New York (April 19) and California (June 7) have yet to weigh in.

Even if Sanders were to win all of those primary and caucus contests in late March and early April, Clinton would still be the front-runner, and she would still enjoy a big delegate lead. But Sanders could get a lot closer to Clinton in the competition—perhaps close enough to convince some superdelegates to move his way. And he can continue to build a movement politics with a potential to influence convention rules, platform planks, and perhaps even the selection process that will name a vice presidential contender.

Sanders has always said that he is mounting this presidential run in order to challenge “establishment politics and establishment economics.” His populist appeal has influenced Clinton on a host of economic issues; indeed, Progressive Change Campaign Committee cofounder Adam Green noted, “Hillary Clinton won Ohio and had a Super Tuesday by riding the economic populist tide instead of fighting it. Clinton has engaged Bernie Sanders in a race to the top on key issues like expanding Social Security instead of cutting it, breaking up too-big-to-fail-banks, jailing Wall Street executives who break the law, and debt-free college. That was almost unimaginable a year ago. In Ohio, Clinton went further than before against corporate-written trade deals, saying, ‘We have to oppose the TPP.’”

Clinton has every reason to celebrate, and every right to begin thinking and talking about a potential race with Trump.

But Sanders has every reason to keep running a primary and caucus race where most of the delegates have yet to be chosen—and where his ability to influence the character and content of the competition remains one of that race’s most significant dynamics.

“The primary continues,” explained Green, “but no matter who wins, the center of gravity has fundamentally shifted in the Democratic Party.”

Sanders did not have the “Super Tuesday” he wanted on March 15. But the prospect of moving that center of gravity further to the left provides more than enough encouragement for the senator to carry on.

Tensions explode in Democraticreidharry_sandersbernie_051716gn primary
Sen. Bernie Sanders is standing by his supporters in the face of mounting criticism from Democratic leaders, including Minority Leader Harry Reid, over the increasingly nasty tone of the Democratic presidential primary.

Sanders on Tuesday issued a statement rejecting claims by Hillary Clinton’s allies that his campaign has shown a penchant for violence as “nonsense.”

It was released just minutes after Reid took to the cameras in the Senate to call on the Vermont senator to do “the right thing” and hold his supporters accountable for a chaotic scene on Saturday at Nevada’s state convention. It seems that Harry Reid has nothing better to do than to create and pass rumors about Bernie Sanders. You can keep that witch Hillary Clinton and
her Bubba that can’t keep his pants enough tight to prevent another escapade, and have a party at the Dark House.

By Alexander Bolton – 05/17/16 08:35 PM EDT

Bernie Sanders is standing by his supporters in the face of mounting criticism from Democratic leaders, including Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, over the increasingly nasty tone of the Democratic presidential primary.

And what are the Dems to criticize if not the 2016 elections that are a big joke. At least in New York City it was shameful.

Sanders on Tuesday issued a statement rejecting claims by Hillary Clinton’s allies that his campaign has shown a penchant for violence as “nonsense.” And who beat Trump and another man
that looks like him? Why you don’t criticize the “penchant for violence in Trumps’ rallies? Oh yeah, you now need Mr. Trump to make you look stupid, something that you already are,
because your Hillary Clinton has so many closets with secrets she won’t make public so you can be united and thus have more power. You are an idiot Mr. Reid.

By Alexander Bolton – 05/17/16 08:35 PM EDT

Bernie Sanders is standing by his supporters in the face of mounting criticism from Democratic leaders, including Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, over the increasingly nasty tone of the Democratic presidential primary.

Sanders on Tuesday issued a statement rejecting claims by Hillary Clinton’s allies that his campaign has shown a penchant for violence as “nonsense.”

Posted by Ainhoa Aristizabal – Unruly Hearts editor

What’s in a Name Change? Politics, Some at George Mason University Fear

 

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia at the 40th anniversary luncheon for the Legal Services Corporation in Washington in September 2014. 

 

Credit Chip Somodevilla

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia at the 40th anniversary luncheon for the Legal Services Corporation in Washington in September 2014. Credit Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

WASHINGTON — For years, students and faculty at George Mason University paid little attention as Charles G. Koch and other conservatives helped transform their once sleepy commuter school in the suburbs of the nation’s capital into a leading producer of free-market scholarship. The effort, after all, was focused on a few specific departments like economics and law and attracted little attention outside conservative circles.

But the announcement last month that George Mason would rename its law school in honor of Justice Antonin Scalia, the longtime voice of the Supreme Court’s conservative wing who died in February, abruptly ended that indifference.

The name change — and that it was tied to a $30 million combined gift from the Charles Koch Foundation and an anonymous conservative donor — focused attention for the first time in a serious way on whether the administration and trustees at George Mason had allowed Virginia’s largest public university to become an ideological outpost.

The university administration insists that the answer is no. But a drumbeat of public letters, social media posts and campus debates expressing concerns about the gift suggests a vocal group of faculty, students and state legislators are not convinced.

“Many of us have been watching this happening for a long time,” said Bethany Letiecq, a professor of human development and family science, “but this just renews interest in the bigger picture, which is the Kochs’ influence in higher education and the decreasing influence of the faculty over decision making.”

On Wednesday, the university’s faculty senate passed a resolution urging the board of visitors and administration to address concerns about the renaming. A more pointed resolution to delay the name change will be revisited next week, faculty members said.

University administrators say that naming the law school after Justice Scalia was meant to honor a highly influential figure in American public life and that the gift behind it will allow the school to expand. Suggestions otherwise, they say, including that the university has ceded academic control to a donor’s interests, amount to little more than politics.

Law School Renamed for Antonin Scalia, Again. Blame Acronym. APRIL 5, 2016
At Memorial, Scalia Remembered as Happy Combatant MARCH 1, 2016
Antonin Scalia, Justice on the Supreme Court, Dies at 79 FEB. 13, 2016

“You need to really cut to the chase and ask: Is the naming of the Scalia Law School a signal to students that you have to have a particular viewpoint to attend,” said David K. Rehr, the law school’s senior associate dean. “I think emphatically and overwhelmingly the answer is no.”

But the debate has raised questions about how, as the university’s growth has outpaced the state of Virginia’s support for it, conservative donors have become increasingly important.

“Public universities are just desperate for money. And if it’s not coming from the state, it has to come from some place,” said David A. Kravitz, a professor of management who sits on the faculty senate. “What’s left is people like the Koch brothers and others, and quite often they provide money that goes toward things that support their interests.”

Over the course of nearly three decades, Mr. Koch, the billionaire industrialist who has pumped millions into conservative causes, and foundations affiliated with him have put a distinct imprint on key segments of the university. Those foundations have given more than $50 million over the past decade, most of it funneled to pet initiatives affiliated with the university, like the Mercatus Center, an economic think tank that churns out libertarian policy research, and the Institute for Humane Studies, which promotes libertarian philosophy. Mr. Koch sits on the boards of both.

Mr. Koch’s foundation has also given generously to the Law and Economics Center, the law school’s flagship program, which emphasizes the economic impact of the law. The school’s dean, Henry N. Butler, used to run the center and has had close ties to the family for decades.

But until the March gift, longtime faculty members said, the conservative influence seemed to stop there. Now, they worry, the university has publicly linked itself to a justice whose views on affirmative action, reproductive rights and same-sex marriage are inappropriate for a university that educates more than 30,000 students from diverse backgrounds.

29scalia-web02-master675

Charles Koch in his office at Koch Industries in Wichita, Kan., in 2012. Credit Bo Rader/The Wichita Eagle, via Associated Press

“To name the school after Scalia is so egregious,” said Craig Willse, a cultural studies professor at George Mason who has helped lead the opposition to the change. “He was racist and homophobic. What does it mean for us to associate ourselves with a figure like that — especially when his views on education run counter to a public university?”

Even at the law school, where the faculty’s ideology and curriculum are widely known, some said the renaming had gone too far.

“I think it’s a really important distinction to make that having conservative faculty and learning about Antonin Scalia and his opinions is an important part of the education here,” said Rebecca Bucchieri, a 2015 graduate of the law school. “But branding the entire school and student body with his views is another thing.”

Ms. Bucchieri, who works for a reproductive rights nonprofit, helped organize a letter from more than 275 law students and alumni opposing the change.

Grant agreements released by the faculty senate show that in addition to the renaming and the creation of scholarships trumpeted by the university, the gift from the Koch Foundation is contingent upon the school hiring 12 new faculty members and creating two new centers that will expand on its Law and Economics focus.

The gift, which will be paid out over several years based on the university carrying out the agreement, also requires that the school “retain focus” on Law and Economics and stipulates that the foundation be notified immediately should Mr. Butler step down.

Those provisions have led to concerns from some faculty members that big donors like Mr. Koch are slowly encroaching on the university’s academic independence.

In their view, they have good reason to be wary. The Charles Koch Foundation usually insists on some say in how its money is used, going as far as asking for the right to have a committee it appointed sign off on hires to a new economics program it funded in 2011 at Florida State University.

David L. Kuebrich, an English professor who is preparing a faculty senate task force report on private donor influence on campus, said there is no need for that kind of explicit direction at George Mason.

“Both the funders and the faculty and staff at these centers share the same libertarian outlook and goals, so they work together well,” said Mr. Kuebrich, who stressed he was not speaking for the task force. “Detailed agreements are likely unnecessary.

The foundation maintains that its gifts do not encroach on academic independence. John Hardin, the foundation’s director of university relations, said that it makes grants based on specific proposals from schools like George Mason. As long as the school is carrying out the agreed-upon vision, the foundation largely stands back, he said.

“We want to ensure that the school retains all authority in determining who the faculty are going to be, what questions they are pursuing, what conclusions they arrive at,” Mr. Hardin said.

With the university’s leadership unlikely to reverse course and Virginia’s governor, Terry McAuliffe, unwilling to intervene, according to a spokesman, opponents of the change have rested their hopes on the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, a board appointed by the governor that must approve the renaming.

The staff of the board, which has not blocked a name change of this sort in recent memory, is reviewing George Mason’s proposal.

 

Bernie Sanders is going all the way to the Convention. He’s a fighter with a past dedicated to the civil rights movement!

Bernie Sanders is going all the way to the Convention!

The corrupt Clinton has the billionaires, but Bernie Sanders has The People!

We The People, his supporters, will continue supporting Bernie. He’s honest and delivers. We were at the rally in Prospect Park and it was amazing seeing how many people attended the rally, including children. Everybody was happy: african-americans, asians, moslems, jews, and white people all stay together to show our support for Bernie.

I can’t believe the New York Times endorsed Hillary Clinton knowing her failures [that go beyond Benghazi] as secretary state, approving and selling arms for terrorist enemies of America.

Filmmaker Oliver Stone recently wrote on menace posed by Hillary Clinton. “Endless wars are certain no matter who succeeds Obama. Clinton’s finger on the nuclear trigger should terrify everyone.

Fresh off wins in Kansas and Nebraska caucuses, Vermont senator unfazed by Hillary Clinton and maintains, ‘I still think we have that path toward victory’.

Bernie Sanders has vowed again to fight until the Democratic convention in July, a day after the presidential campaign’s “Super Saturday” saw him win two states and lose one to Hillary Clinton.

“I still think we have that path toward victory,” he said. Death of Nancy Reagan casts shadow on 2016 presidential race – as it happened Cruz claims victories in Kansas and Maine, Trump wins two others; Maine and Puerto Rico vote ahead of Democrat debate

Sanders’ wins helped him bounce back from a tough Super Tuesday, although by winning Saturday’s Louisiana primary, Clinton took more delegates than Sanders on the day. According to the Associated Press, Clinton now has 1,121 delegates pledged to support her at the convention, compared with 481 for Sanders. The threshold for securing the nomination is 2,383.

Speaking on CNN on Sunday, Sanders was asked if he would fight to the convention if Clinton reached the delegate threshold before that.

“We have made enormous progress over the last 10 months,” Sanders said in an appearance on CNN, listing successes that, as well as wins in Kansas and Nebraska on Saturday, include New Hampshire, Colorado, Minnesota, Vermont and Oklahoma.

“We are going to stay in the campaign until the convention in July.”

After host Dana Bash repeated her question, Sanders did not offer a yes or no answer. He said: “Dana, you are speculating, I don’t think [Clinton reaching the threshold] is going to happen.”

Sanders said he could win in big, urban states – New York, for example – and on the west coast.

“We think we have momentum and we think we’re going to do just fine,” he said.

Speaking to CNN from Michigan, where he was due to debate Clinton in Flint on Sunday night, Sanders was also asked about his problem in attracting African American voters, who have sided with Clinton in large numbers in southern states and who will be influential in Michigan’s primary on Tuesday.

The Vermont senator admitted his struggles in the south but said there was also a “generational divide” in the Democratic race, with his campaign attracting support from youths regardless of race.

“We have now won seven primaries and caucuses across the country all with double-digit leads,” he said, predicting a strong performance in Maine on Sunday “if the turnout is high”.

He later told ABC: “In every primary and caucus that we have won, we have won by double-digit numbers. I still think we have that path toward victory.”

A CBS poll released on Sunday gave Clinton a 55%-44% lead over Sanders in Michigan. Donald Trump led the Republican field there, 39%-24% over Ted Cruz.

Sanders also said he was the strongest candidate to beat Donald Trump.

“We are going to stay in the campaign until the convention in July.”

After host Dana Bash repeated her question, Sanders did not offer a yes or no answer. He said: “Dana, you are speculating, I don’t think [Clinton reaching the threshold] is going to happen.”

Sanders said he could win in big, urban states – New York, for example – and on the west coast.

“We think we have momentum and we think we’re going to do just fine,” he said.

Speaking to CNN from Michigan, where he was due to debate Clinton in Flint on Sunday night, Sanders was also asked about his problem in attracting African American voters, who have sided with Clinton in large numbers in southern states and who will be influential in Michigan’s primary on Tuesday.

The Vermont senator admitted his struggles in the south but said there was also a “generational divide” in the Democratic race, with his campaign attracting support from youths regardless of race.

“We have now won seven primaries and caucuses across the country all with double-digit leads,” he said, predicting a strong performance in Maine on Sunday “if the turnout is high”.

He later told ABC: “In every primary and caucus that we have won, we have won by double-digit numbers. I still think we have that path toward victory.”

A CBS poll released on Sunday gave Clinton a 55%-44% lead over Sanders in Michigan. Donald Trump led the Republican field there, 39%-24% over Ted Cruz.

Sanders also said he was the strongest candidate to beat Donald Trump.

Posted by Ainhoa Aristizabal — Unruly Hearts editor