Album Stream – The Orwells’ ‘Disgraceland’

The Orwells

The Orwells

Album Stream – The Orwells’ ‘Disgraceland’

Chicago’s newest garage rock rebels The Orwells may only just be leaving their teens behind, but they’re already gearing up to release their second LP – with the brilliantly tongue-in-cheek title of ‘Disgraceland’ – on June 2.

Famed for their raucous live shows invoking the chaotic hedonism of Atlanta’s favourite tearaways Black Lips, and singer Mario Cuomo’s outlandish stage behaviour and outspoken tongue (the band’s recent comments about Arctic Monkeys’ stage patter being predictable landed them in hot water), the band are leading the charge of punk-spirited young bands putting fun at the fore.

A giant step on from the DIY ethos of 2012 debut ‘Remember When’, ‘Disgraceland’ ups the production values to form something that’s still full of carefree youth, but could also sit happily on the radio. You’ll probably have heard filthy first single ‘Dirty Sheets’ – a squalling mass of prowling riffs and 60s garage strut – while other recent cuts ‘The Righteous One’ and ‘Blood Bubbles’ are, in turn, full of brilliantly snotty swagger and surprisingly epic tendencies. Elsewhere on the record, the quintet up the pop factor on ‘Bathroom Tile Blues’, while old favourite ‘Who Needs You’ is still as much of a middle finger to the man as ever.

‘Disgraceland’ is due for release on Canvasback/ Atlantic next Monday, but for now you can stream the whole thing exclusively below. Let us know what you think in the comments section.

Band To Watch: Bleeding Rainbow

Bleeding Rainbow band members

Bleeding Rainbow band members

Eyes down for Philadelphia neo-shoegaze quartet, as approved by Grohl and Novoselic.

Philadelphia-based Bleeding Rainbow started life as his-and-hers duo Reading Rainbow until the partnership of Sarah Everton and Rob Garcia revised their moniker and expanded to a four-piece on their 2013 LP, Yeah Right. (The story that Sleater-Kinney’s Carrie Brownstein prompted the name change with a single withering remark may or may not be apocryphal…)

So You Know, a taster from their forthcoming album, Interrupt (out on Kanine Records on February 24), employs their expanded instrumental mass to propel a gauzy three minutes of woozily atmospheric guitar rock that fits the Ride-MBV paradigm snugly, but sidesteps the scuzzier connotations of ’80s UK indie by foregrounding Sarah Everton’s coolly beguiling voice: a cleaner, more modern take on the shoegaze allure of Bilinda Butcher or Slowdive’s Rachel Goswell.

Famous fans of the band include both Dave Grohl and Kris Novoselic, apparently. See if you agree with the Nirvana legends, listen to So You Know here:

 

 

 

Band to Watch: Lucius

Rising Brooklyn quintet Lucius follows up its recent and much buzzed about appearance at Wilco’s Solid Sound Festival with this twangy, emotive keeper, “Go Home.” Boasting bow ties, big blue eyes and the intertwining vocals of Jess Wolfe and Holly Laessig, the track (and its accompanying video) anchor the band’s debut album Wildewoman, out October 15th.

In advance of their first album, Lucius has had the distinction of playing Bonnaroo, amassing coverage from the likes of NPR and The New York Times, and singing covers of The Kinks, Abba and The Band classics with Jeff Tweedy. The group is currently in the midst of a North American tour that touches down at Bar in New Haven, Connecticut on August 7th and counts a homecoming show at Brooklyn’s Music Hall of Williamsburg on August 14th.

There’s no mistaking Lucius for anyone else onstage: Led by singers Holly Laessig and Jess Wolfe, the five-piece Brooklyn group wear matching stylized outfits and perform in lock-step unison. There’s more to Lucius than looks, though: Laessig and Wolfe harmonize so tightly it’s tough to tell whose voice is whose. They play keyboards on catchy, distinctive indie-pop tunes while Danny Molad, Peter Lalish and Andrew Burri flesh out the sound with guitars and drums. After releasing a self-titled EP last year, they’ll be back this fall with a full-length release.