Pearl Jam Play Entire ‘No Code,’ Debut New Song at Moline Concert

 

 

 

Pearl Jam had a pair of major surprises in store for fans at their Friday night concert at Moline, Illinois’ iWireless Center. Not only did Eddie Vedder debut a new song dedicated to the Quad Cities town, Pearl Jam performed their 1996 album No Code straight through in its entirety, from “Sometimes” to closer “Around the Bend,” Jambase reports. “No Code. Front to back. #PJMoline #PJFall2014,” the band tweeted before sharing a photo of the Moline setlist, which confirmed that the new song Vedder debuted onstage was also called “Moline.”

According to WQAD, Vedder told the crowd that the new song was written especially for Moline and the Quad Cities area. “Moline, it seems, this is for me. You can call me Nancy and I live in Moline,” Vedder sings on the track that’s about a woman who leaves Detroit for the Illinois city. Vedder also revealed that he’d written the song just minutes before the band took the stage, and that the cut was related to Vitalogy‘s “Better Man.”

It’s unclear why Pearl Jam opted to make Moline, Illinois the setting for the No Code performance other than the fact that the 1996 album was partially recorded nearly two decades ago at the not-so-nearby Chicago Recording Company studio. Vedder joked following the performance of No Code‘s “Off He Goes,” “Alright, end of side one.” The singer told the crowd that the No Code performance marked only the second time the band had performed a studio album of theirs in its entirety; as the band’s official message board points out, Pearl Jam played their whole 2006 self-titled record, out of sequence, at a Torino, Italy concert in September of that year.

In a wild coincidence, on the same night that the Foo Fighters were rocking out with Cheap Trick’s Rick Nielsen at Chicago’s the Cubby Bear and on a previously recorded Late Show With David Letterman performance, Mike McCready also paid tribute to the guitarist by busting out a checkerboard guitar Nielsen had given him while Jeff Ament brought out a bass with a similar pattern.

Best Concerts at Lollapalooza 2014

lolla

 

Conceived and created in 1991 by Jane’s Addiction singer Perry Farrell as a farewell tour for his band, Lollapalooza ran annually until 1997, and was revived in 2003. From its inception through 1997, and its revival in 2003, the festival toured North America. In 2004, the festival organizers decided to expand the dates to two days per city, however poor ticket sales forced the 2004 tour to be cancelled. In 2005, Farrell and the William Morris Agency partnered up with Austin, Texas-based company Capital Sports Entertainment (now C3 Presents) and retooled it into its current format as a weekend destination festival.

 

The Festival Best Concerts

Arctic Monkeys at Lollapalooza 2014 (full show)

Lorde

Chvrches

Foster The People

Cage The Elephant

Portugal The Man

Album Stream – The Orwells’ ‘Disgraceland’

The Orwells

The Orwells

Album Stream – The Orwells’ ‘Disgraceland’

Chicago’s newest garage rock rebels The Orwells may only just be leaving their teens behind, but they’re already gearing up to release their second LP – with the brilliantly tongue-in-cheek title of ‘Disgraceland’ – on June 2.

Famed for their raucous live shows invoking the chaotic hedonism of Atlanta’s favourite tearaways Black Lips, and singer Mario Cuomo’s outlandish stage behaviour and outspoken tongue (the band’s recent comments about Arctic Monkeys’ stage patter being predictable landed them in hot water), the band are leading the charge of punk-spirited young bands putting fun at the fore.

A giant step on from the DIY ethos of 2012 debut ‘Remember When’, ‘Disgraceland’ ups the production values to form something that’s still full of carefree youth, but could also sit happily on the radio. You’ll probably have heard filthy first single ‘Dirty Sheets’ – a squalling mass of prowling riffs and 60s garage strut – while other recent cuts ‘The Righteous One’ and ‘Blood Bubbles’ are, in turn, full of brilliantly snotty swagger and surprisingly epic tendencies. Elsewhere on the record, the quintet up the pop factor on ‘Bathroom Tile Blues’, while old favourite ‘Who Needs You’ is still as much of a middle finger to the man as ever.

‘Disgraceland’ is due for release on Canvasback/ Atlantic next Monday, but for now you can stream the whole thing exclusively below. Let us know what you think in the comments section.