Longstanding US Cuba Policy: Regime Change!

 

 

drapeau-cuba-400x318Obama is right. Sanctions don’t work. Not against Cuba. Russia. Iran or other countries. Provided they stay firm.  

Defending their sovereign rights. Cuba did admirably. For over half a century. Against US imperialism.

Its leadership a testimony to successful sovereign resilience. Prevailing against long odds.

 

Longstanding US Cuban policy failed. Washington’s objective remains unchanged. Regime change! Installing pro-Western stooge governance. Returning Cuba to its bad old days.

Castro gained power on January 1, 1959. Transforming a repressive brothel into a populist state. Ousting Washington’s man in Havana. Fulgencio Batista. A despot by any standard.

Franklin Roosevelt once called former Nicaraguan dictator Anastasio Somoza “a son of a bitch. (B)ut he’s our son of a bitch,” he explained.

America supports many like him. Batista’s fascist regime earlier. Current repressive Central America/Caribbean governments. In Honduras. Guatemala. Haiti.

Saudi Arabia. Other Gulf states. Ukraine in central Europe. Fascists running Israel. Numerous other repressive regimes.

Obama’s new Cuba gambit reflects imperial policy by other means. Hold the cheers. More on this below.

Until illness in 2006 forced him to step down, Fidel was the world’s longest serving political leader. Now aged 88, its preeminent elder statesman.

Still expressing important views. “Reflections of Fidel.” In September saying “just ideas or disaster will triumph.”

“Global society has known no peace in recent years.” Because of US/European policies. Threatening world peace. With “weapons which could mean the end of human existence.”

He called Western regimes “unscrupulous actors.” Especially America. “(I)nterven(ing) militarily in Cuba…” Earlier owning most of the country. Raping it for profit.

Preventing Cubans from “produc(ing) enough grain to feed the population…Cynicism is something which has become symbolic of imperial policy.”

Rapaciousness defines it. “(O)ur interests,” said Obama. Castro knows them well. Duplicity writ large. Plotting control over Cuba again.

Intending to colonize it for profit. Plunder its resources. Including offshore oil. Exploit its people. Obama is a serial liar.

Claiming US policy is “rooted in the best of intentions…” Brazen dishonesty. Willful deception. Longstanding US policies speak for themselves.

Serving monied interests exclusively. At the expense of beneficial social change. Mindless of democratic rights. Rule of law principles.

Including prohibitions against interfering in the internal affairs of other nations. Sovereign independence is inviolable.

Not according to Washington rules. Imposing them lawlessly. With full scoundrel media support. The New York Times outrageously calls Cuba “a repressive police state.”

Ignoring decades of ruthless US anti-Castro policy. Hailing a “historic move.” “Transformational.”

Claiming Washington is right in demanding “greater personal freedoms and democratic change.”

Instead of exposing it as the world’s most egregious civil and human rights abuser. None match America’s abusive record. Longstanding. Horrific by any standard.

The Times was right calling US Cuban policy “one of the most misguided chapters in American foreign policy.” Mindless of Obama’s intent.

Opening Cuba to America’s monied interests spells trouble. Like it always does. US policies aren’t benign.

Cuba already infested with US anti-government operatives. USAID. The National Endowment for Democracy (NED).

International Republican Institute (IRI). Freedom House. Center for a Free Cuba. Institute for Democracy in Cuba. Cuba Dissidence Task Group.

Various other groups and initiatives. Raul Castro warned earlier about “attempts to subtly introduce platforms for neoliberal thought and for the restoration of neocolonial capitalism.”

Saying he “reiterated on many occasions our willingness to hold a respectful dialogue with the United States on the basis of sovereign equality in order to deal reciprocally with a wide variety of topics without detriment to the national Independence and self-determination of our people.” [Raul Castro is the Cuban version of Vlad Putin] Read below:

“We propose to the Government of the United States the adoption of mutual steps to improve the bilateral atmosphere and advance towards normalization of relations between our two countries, based on the principles of International Law and the United Nations Charter.”

“We don’t demand that the US change its political or social system and we don’t accept negotiations over ours.”

It bears repeating. Longstanding US policy call for regime change. Obama’s pronouncement shows tactics alone changing.

By establishing diplomatic relations. Opening a Havana embassy. Regime change headquarters. Infested with CIA operatives for sure. Plotting destabilization tactics.

Obama loosening embargo conditions. As much as possible by executive order. Without congressional approval. Unlikely with Republicans in charge next year.

Or Democrats like current Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman Robert Menendez (D. NJ). Blasting Obama.

Turning truth on its head saying his “actions have vindicate the brutal behavior of the Cuban government. (S)et(ting) an extremely dangerous precedent.”

“(I)nvit(ing) dictatorial and rogue regimes to use Americans serving overseas as bargaining chips. I fear that today’s actions will put at risk the thousands of Americans that work overseas to support civil society, advocate for access to information, provide humanitarian services, and promote democratic reforms.”

The New York Times cited unnamed administration officials. Saying Treasury will issue easing Cuban trade regulations. On US agricultural exports. Banking relations.

Commerce Department will permit exports of construction materials. Telecommunications equipment. Scientific, athletic and cultural products. Various other goods.

Efforts will move quickly to replace old rules with new ones. Facilitating travel. Financial dealings. Exports. According to US officials.

“The Office of Foreign Assets Control at the Treasury Department will scrap a measure that requires people who are already eligible for travel to Cuba to receive special permission from the government for trips such as those involving family visits, professional, religious or cultural programs and humanitarian projects,” said The Times.

“New rules will also make it easier to get there, by allowing the direct purchase of airline tickets to Cuba rather than requiring travelers to go through a travel agent and charter a flight.”

Treasury is increasing how much money Americans may send Cubans. Fourfold. From $500 to $2,000.

The State Department may end Cuba’s unjust state sponsor of terrorism designation. Longstanding US Cuban policy reflects it writ large. Don’t expect The Times to explain.

According to US Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs, Roberta Jacobson:

“We would anticipate that we will have an embassy before” nominating an ambassador.

“That process is relatively straightforward, frankly, from a legal perspective. We can do that via an exchange of letters or of notes. It doesn’t require a formal sort of legal treaty or agreement.”

White House officials said they spent months determining how far to go unilaterally. Without violating the letter of embargo conditions. Or “eviscerat(ing)” them.

Washington’s Havana Interests Section will serve as its embassy. A future nest of destabilizing spies.

Political analyst Andrew Korybko asked if Raul Castro “reverse(d) the entire Cuban revolution.” Did he make “a fatal mistake?”

By getting in bed with the devil. It remains to be seen how much. Will color revolution follow? At age 88, Fidel’s time is passing. Whether soon or later who knows.

Korybko believes he’s closer to death than Havana admits. An era will pass with his loss. Inevitable sooner or later. Key is what follows.

Raul is 83. Reportedly in good health. Last year saying he’ll step down in 2018. “This is my last term,” he said. Shortly after National Assembly members reelected him for another five years.

At the same time naming Miguel Diaz-Canel Bermudez First Vice President. Next in line to Raul.

Cuba’s current government appears its last under Fidel and Raul. Possible succession figures include Diaz-Canel. Four other vice presidents.

Including Jose Machado Ventura. Aged 82. Ceding his first vice presidential position to Diaz-Canel.

Commander of the Revolution Ramiro Valdes. Aged 80. Comptroller General Gladys Bejerano. Aged 66. Both vice presidents.

Others include First Secretary of the Communist Party Mercedes Lopexz Acea. Aged 48. Labor federation head Salvador Valdes Mesa. Aged 64.

In 2013, 68-year-old former vice president Estaban Lazo was named National Assembly president. Replacing longtime leader Ricardo Alarcon.

Earlier he commented on who would succeed Fidel, saying:

“All those who have been trying to fool the world and put out the idea that something terrible would happen in Cuba, that people would take to the streets, that there would be great instability, the door slammed on them and they must have very swollen hands now.”

Cuban policy going forward remains to be seen. New leaders will replace old ones. Hopefully revolutionary spirit won’t change.

Remaining vibrant. Resilient. Redoubtable. Too precious to lose.

Noam Chomsky calls US ‘world’s leading terrorist state’

U.S. linguist and philosopher Noam Chomsky (Reuters/Jorge Dan)

U.S. linguist and philosopher Noam Chomsky (Reuters/Jorge Dan)

 

RT news

The United States is the “world’s leading terrorist state,” based on its deadly, CIA-run operations in the likes of Nicaragua and Cuba, according to new op-ed by historian and social philosopher Noam Chomsky.

In a new piece posted at Truthout.org, Chomsky pointed to the Central Intelligence Agency’s classified review of its own efforts to arm insurgencies across the globe in its 67-year history. As RT previously reported, the CIA conducted the effectiveness analyses while the Obama administration contemplated arming rebels fighting against President Bashar Assad’s forces in Syria.

The New York Times was the first to uncover the story and Chomsky opened by suggesting the Times’ own headline for it should have been titled, “It’s official: The U.S. is the world’s leading terrorist state, and proud of it,” rather than “CIA Study of Covert Aid Fueled Skepticism About Helping Syrian Rebels.”

 

A rebel fighter from the Free Syrian Army holds a position with a Belgium made FAL rifle at a front line in the Salah al-Din neighbourhood of the northern Syrian city of Aleppo (AFP Photo)

A rebel fighter from the Free Syrian Army holds a position with a Belgium made FAL rifle at a front line in the Salah al-Din neighbourhood of the northern Syrian city of Aleppo (AFP Photo)

The longtime MIT professor went on to detail some of the instances assessed in the CIA’s review and why they amount to an American regime – “the world champion in generating terror” – bent on antagonizing its opposition around the world.

“The first paragraph of the Times article cites three major examples of ‘covert aid’: Angola, Nicaragua and Cuba. In fact, each case was a major terrorist operation conducted by the US,” Chomsky wrote.

He added that it was the US, in the 1980s, that supported Apartheid-era South Africa as it invaded Angola to protect itself “from one of the world’s ‘more notorious terrorist groups,” according to Washington: “Nelson Mandela’s African National Congress.”

“Washington joined South Africa in providing crucial support for Jonas Savimbi’s terrorist Unita army in Angola,” wrote Chomsky.

Unita army (AFP Photo)

Unita army (AFP Photo)

“The consequences were horrendous. A 1989 U.N. inquiry estimated that South African depredations led to 1.5 million deaths in neighboring countries, let alone what was happening within South Africa itself.”

Chomsky also mentioned the decades-long “murderous and destructive campaign” the US aimed at Cuba, including the failed Bay of Pigs invasion and a harsh embargo that continues to this day.

“The toll of the long terrorist war was amplified by a crushing embargo, which continues even today in defiance of the world. On Oct. 28, the UN, for the 23rd time, endorsed ‘the necessity of ending the economic, commercial, financial blockade imposed by the United States against Cuba,’” he wrote.

Chomsky mentioned the dirty wars the US brought to opposition in Central America in the 1980s and current airstrikes in Syria and Iraq aimed at Islamic State, a jihadist group, like others, compiled and strengthened through American interventions in the Middle East, namely the recent Iraq war, he wrote.

 

AFP Photo/U.S. Air Force

AFP Photo/U.S. Air Force

He ended with a note on President Barack Obama’s unmanned drone regime patrolling the skies in the likes of Pakistan and Yemen.

“To this we may add the world’s greatest terrorist campaign: Obama’s global project of assassination of ‘terrorists.’ The ‘resentment-generating impact’ of those drone and special-forces strikes should be too well known to require further comment,” he wrote.

“This is a record to be contemplated with some awe.”

The courage of a small and impoverished island with a big heart…

19cuba-editorial-master675

Cuban health workers in Sierra Leone.Credit Florian Plaucheur/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

 

Cuba’s Impressive Role on Ebola – The Times

Cuba leads in the fight against Ebola in West Africa

cuban-ebola-team520x307-685x342

Photo: WHO’s Director, Dr. Margarat Chan and Dr Roberto Morales Ojeda, Cuba’s Minister of Public Health, at the announcement that Cuba will send a medical team of 165 people to Sierra Leone to help in the frontline in the Ebola response efforts.

September 18, 2014

By Dennis Laumann

From the People’s World

 

Cuba is the first nation in the world to answer an urgent call for personnel to help stop the spread of Ebola in West Africa and will send 165 medical professionals to Sierra Leone, one of the three countries most affectedby the virus, next month.

The announcement was made last Friday by Dr. Roberto Morales Ojeda, Cuba’s Minister of Public Health, at a news conference at the headquarters of the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva, Switzerland. Although other countries have pledged money or supplies, Cuba is the first to offer its most valuable asset and what is most needed to combat Ebola: well-trained, experienced doctors, nurses, and other health care experts.

It is reported that the United States will follow Cuba’s lead as President Barack Obama is expected to announce plans to send 3,000 military troops to Liberia to supervise building of treatment centers and train medical staff.

Cuba’s decision is consistent with a long history of solidarity with other developing nations, particularly those facing crises. Indeed, the WHO’s Director, Dr. Margarat Chan, not only praised Cuba’s contribution to fighting the Ebola crisis but its larger role in providing medical care to millions around the world. “Cuba is world famous for its ability to train outstanding doctors and nurses and for its generosity in helping fellow countries on the route to progress,” she asserted.

Chan thanked Cuban President Raul Castro and upheld Cuba’s experiences in emergency situations as a model for other countries to emulate. During the devastating 2010 earthquake, for example, hundreds ofCuban medical workers were sent to Haiti, and many remained there to provide health care. At present, there are over 50,000 Cuban health care professionals working in 66 countries, including 2,500 doctors in 32 African nations. One of the most celebrated programs is “Mission Miracle” in Venezuela, where Cuban doctorshave performed thousands of cataract operations and also run clinics in poor urban neighborhoods and rural communities.

Cuban doctors were already working in Sierra Leone when the Ebola outbreak began in December 2013 in Guinea. The crisis has overwhelmed the three neighboring countries of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. There have been a few reported cases in Nigeria and Senegal, although it appears transmission of the virus has been brought under control in those nations. Over 2,400 people have died from the virus and at least 4,900 more are known to be infected, although WHO officials and others have suggested those numbers are drastically underestimated. Moreover, the disease is spreading rapidly, there are insufficient facilities to treat those infected, and health care workers have died in disproportionate numbers.

The three most affected countries have only recently emerged from political crises – in the cases of Liberia and Sierra Leone, decades of civil war – and already lacked adequate health facilities and personnel before the crisis. These factors, combined with prevalent poverty and widespread illiteracy, make controlling the Ebola outbreak a seemingly impossible task. In addition to the human toll, the crisis is crippling agricultural output and mining activities, the primary sectors of the sub-region’s economies.

Declaring the crisis “unparalleled in modern times,” the United Nations’ Ebola coordinator, David Nabarro, said that more than $1 billion is needed to end the outbreak in West Africa. Several countries and organizations have made monetary pledges to help the fight against

Ebola, but few have followed through with their commitments.

Ghana’s President John Mahama, current chairman of the Economic Community of West African States, yesterday visited Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, and criticized the slow pace of assistance. “We need to speed up the roll out of all these pledges,” Mahama stated. “The processes in terms of budgeting, in terms of putting in the procurement are quite cumbersome and so, if we can speed that up, it will help greatly.”

Nevertheless, as the WHO’s Chan explained last week, “Money and materials are important, but these two things alone cannot stop Ebola virus transmission. Human resources are clearly our most important need. We need most especially compassionate doctors and nurses who will know how to comfort patients despite the barriers of wearing PPE (personal protective equipment) and working under very demanding conditions.”

The Cuban team consists of health care professionals who have experience working in countries facing natural disasters and disease outbreaks and includes 100 nurses, 50 doctors, three epidemiologists, three intensive care specialists, three infection control specialist nurses, and five social mobilization officers. The team is now receiving special training in Cuba and will spend six months in Sierra Leone working in Ebola treatment centers and community clinics across the nation.

Dr. Bruce Aylward, Assistant Director of the WHO emphasized the significance of Cuba’s contribution: “Those of us who have been working on the response efforts at WHO know how truly valuable this offer is. Many countries have offered money but no country has offered such a large number of workers to go in and help do the most difficult job in the crisis.”

Photo: WHO’s Director, Dr. Margarat Chan and Dr Roberto Morales Ojeda, Cuba’s Minister of Public Health, at the announcement that Cuba will send a medical team of 165 people to Sierra Leone to help in the frontline in the Ebola response efforts.