Pearl Jam Play Entire ‘No Code,’ Debut New Song at Moline Concert

 

 

 

Pearl Jam had a pair of major surprises in store for fans at their Friday night concert at Moline, Illinois’ iWireless Center. Not only did Eddie Vedder debut a new song dedicated to the Quad Cities town, Pearl Jam performed their 1996 album No Code straight through in its entirety, from “Sometimes” to closer “Around the Bend,” Jambase reports. “No Code. Front to back. #PJMoline #PJFall2014,” the band tweeted before sharing a photo of the Moline setlist, which confirmed that the new song Vedder debuted onstage was also called “Moline.”

According to WQAD, Vedder told the crowd that the new song was written especially for Moline and the Quad Cities area. “Moline, it seems, this is for me. You can call me Nancy and I live in Moline,” Vedder sings on the track that’s about a woman who leaves Detroit for the Illinois city. Vedder also revealed that he’d written the song just minutes before the band took the stage, and that the cut was related to Vitalogy‘s “Better Man.”

It’s unclear why Pearl Jam opted to make Moline, Illinois the setting for the No Code performance other than the fact that the 1996 album was partially recorded nearly two decades ago at the not-so-nearby Chicago Recording Company studio. Vedder joked following the performance of No Code‘s “Off He Goes,” “Alright, end of side one.” The singer told the crowd that the No Code performance marked only the second time the band had performed a studio album of theirs in its entirety; as the band’s official message board points out, Pearl Jam played their whole 2006 self-titled record, out of sequence, at a Torino, Italy concert in September of that year.

In a wild coincidence, on the same night that the Foo Fighters were rocking out with Cheap Trick’s Rick Nielsen at Chicago’s the Cubby Bear and on a previously recorded Late Show With David Letterman performance, Mike McCready also paid tribute to the guitarist by busting out a checkerboard guitar Nielsen had given him while Jeff Ament brought out a bass with a similar pattern.

Pearl Jam’s Musician and Activist Eddie Vedder : ‘Black’ + Interview

 

 

Eddie Vedder Talks Music, Activism

Pearl Jam exploded onto the Seattle music scene in 1991 and has been fending off celebrity ever since. The group’s debut album, “Ten,” reached No. 2 on the pop charts and has sold some 12 million copies, but the band shunned endorsements and shied away from almost all self-promotion, even refusing to make videos for a time. Close to two decades later, it’s clear they didn’t need the hype. In a 2005 USA Today readers’ poll, Pearl Jam was voted the greatest American rock band of all time. They’ve managed to take up causes from health care to antitrust, even testifying before Congress in a Justice Department probe into Ticketmaster. Currently at work on their ninth studio album, Pearl Jam is re-releasing “Ten” in four new and expanded editions that include six bonus tracks. Lead singer Eddie Vedder, 44, spoke about the reissue, balancing music with activism, and life as a father of two. Excerpts:

How has Pearl Jam changed in the years since “Ten” was first released?
Eddie Vedder: I think in so many ways we’ve grown up, but I think in music you’re also able to hang on to a part of youth that in a normal job you’d have to surrender. In a way, it was a blessing that we didn’t have families at the time, because we could give everything to the music. But I never thought we’d have to actually look back and answer questions about 20 years ago.

How much of this has become about activism for you, and how much is still about music?
I think it’s always been a balance. I think music is the greatest art form that exists, and I think people listen to music for different reasons, and it serves different purposes. Some of it is background music, and some of it is things that might affect a person’s day, if not their life, or change an attitude. The best songs are the ones that make you feel something. But it’s really a balance, because part of it is just, well, you’re a rock-and-roll band. But what happens is you learn that a rock-and-roll band can be a whole lot of things.

Has the way you pursue activism changed?
Back [in our early days] it was very knee-jerk: You’d want to kick out a stained-glass window to get your point across. Now you try to deliver better business plans to corporate entities so they can still make a profit, but do it without destroying land or culture.

Has having a family changed your views about celebrity?
I don’t really have too many views on it, to be honest. [Laughs] Seattle’s very close-knit, and I don’t feel any different, even though I have a different job than some of the other parents at school. How else do I answer that?

Well, what’s it like to be a rock star?
You know, rock stardom … I have a hard time discussing that because I don’t really accept it. It’s not really that tangible. What’s really bizarre is how it’s used as a thing—you know, “He’s the rock star of politics,” “He’s the rock star of quarterbacks”—like it’s the greatest thing in the world. And it’s not bad, but it’s just different. I don’t understand it. Cause I’m going, “Well—am I that?” I want to be the plumber of rock stars.

How do you keep your music relevant?
I think by pushing the boundaries, by not doing something you’ve already done, and pushing each other as bandmates to create in a new way.

Do you miss that Seattle heyday of the early ’90s at all?
I think what we miss is the bands all showing up at each other’s shows, and five people being up onstage, and then the next night the same people that were up onstage being in the audience and vice versa. Everyone was very supportive of each other. And, you know, there were some great f–king living-room parties as well. And it still happens, it’s just a little less.

Does that community you talk about still exist?
You know, it’s amazing how few bands are able to keep it together. But I’d like to think there’s still a number of us who, for lack of a better word, are slaves to rock and roll. It’s in us and we need it. And I think it’s trickier now because a lot of us have to be a little bit more grown up. We’re parents and we’re figuring out how to do both. Because as much as I would dedicate my life solely to music, I wouldn’t sacrifice the kids’ upbringing to do it.

You recently had a second daughter.
Yep, she’s 4 months old. She was born on Bruce Springsteen’s birthday. So my one kid’s 4, my other kid’s 4 months, I’m 44 —it’s all lining up nicely here.

Do you still wear a lot of flannel?
I’m not wearing one today, but I sure was wearing one yesterday.

 

Brian Eno Addresses Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in Passionate Letter on David Byrne’s Website

Brian Eno is an English musician, composer, record producer, singer, and visual artist, known as one of the principal innovators of ambient music.

Brian Eno has shared his feelings about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in a passionate letter that has been published on David Byrne’s website.

“I received this email last Friday morning from my friend, Brian Eno,” Byrne wrote on his site. “I shared it with my office and we all felt a great responsibility to publish Brian’s heavy, worthy note.”

The artists have collaborated on such albums as My Life in the Bush of Ghosts in 1981 and Everything That Happens Will Happen Today in 2008.

In the note, which can be read in full below, Eno questions the United States’ response to the violence, asking, “Why does America continue its blind support of this one-sided exercise in ethnic cleansing?”

Eno also shares details about his 2013 visit to Israel where he witnessed brutal violence against Palestinians. “I kept thinking, ‘Do Americans really condone this? Do they really think this is OK? Or do they just not know about it?'”

Numerous musicians have spoken out against the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict in recent weeks, including One Direction’s Zayn Malik, Rihanna, Selena Gomez and Eddie Vedder. Artists like Neil Young, Backstreet Boys and Paul Anka have canceled performances in Israel as well.

In a video released by freedom4palestine.org, a group including Eno, Chuck D, Ken Loach, Mira Nair, Desmond Tutu, Roger Waters, and Naomi Klein hold up cards with the names and ages of Palestinian civilians recently killed in Gaza. The UN estimates that more than 70 percent of those who have lost their lives in the fighting were civilians, including more than 220 children and 110 women.

 

Read Eno’s full letter below (via davidbyrne.com).

Dear All of You:

I sense I’m breaking an unspoken rule with this letter, but I can’t keep quiet any more.

Today I saw a picture of a weeping Palestinian man holding a plastic carrier bag of meat. It was his son. He’d been shredded (the hospital’s word) by an Israeli missile attack – apparently using their fab new weapon, flechette bombs. You probably know what those are – hundreds of small steel darts packed around explosive which tear the flesh off humans. The boy was Mohammed Khalaf al-Nawasra. He was 4 years old.

I suddenly found myself thinking that it could have been one of my kids in that bag, and that thought upset me more than anything has for a long time.

Then I read that the UN had said that Israel might be guilty of war crimes in Gaza, and they wanted to launch a commission into that. America won’t sign up to it.

What is going on in America? I know from my own experience how slanted your news is, and how little you get to hear about the other side of this story. But – for Christ’s sake! – it’s not that hard to find out. Why does America continue its blind support of this one-sided exercise in ethnic cleansing? WHY? I just don’t get it. I really hate to think its just the power of AIPAC… for if that’s the case, then your government really is fundamentally corrupt. No, I don’t think that’s the reason… but I have no idea what it could be.

The America I know and like is compassionate, broadminded, creative, eclectic, tolerant and generous. You, my close American friends, symbolise those things for me. But which America is backing this horrible one-sided colonialist war? I can’t work it out: I know you’re not the only people like you, so how come all those voices aren’t heard or registered? How come it isn’t your spirit that most of the world now thinks of when it hears the word ‘America’? How bad does it look when the one country which more than any other grounds its identity in notions of Liberty and Democracy then goes and puts its money exactly where its mouth isn’t and supports a ragingly racist theocracy?

I was in Israel last year with Mary. Her sister works for UNWRA in Jerusalem. Showing us round were a Palestinian – Shadi, who is her sister’s husband and a professional guide – and Oren Jacobovitch, an Israeli Jew, an ex-major from the IDF who left the service under a cloud for refusing to beat up Palestinians. Between the two of them we got to see some harrowing things – Palestinian houses hemmed in by wire mesh and boards to prevent settlers throwing shit and piss and used sanitary towels at the inhabitants; Palestinian kids on their way to school being beaten by Israeli kids with baseball bats to parental applause and laughter; a whole village evicted and living in caves while three settler families moved onto their land; an Israeli settlement on top of a hill diverting its sewage directly down onto Palestinian farmland below; The Wall; the checkpoints… and all the endless daily humiliations. I kept thinking, “Do Americans really condone this? Do they really think this is OK? Or do they just not know about it?”.

As for the Peace Process: Israel wants the Process but not the Peace. While ‘the process’ is going on the settlers continue grabbing land and building their settlements… and then when the Palestinians finally erupt with their pathetic fireworks they get hammered and shredded with state-of-the-art missiles and depleted uranium shells because Israel ‘has a right to defend itself’ ( whereas Palestine clearly doesn’t). And the settler militias are always happy to lend a fist or rip up someone’s olive grove while the army looks the other way. By the way, most of them are not ethnic Israelis – they’re ‘right of return’ Jews from Russia and Ukraine and Moravia and South Africa and Brooklyn who came to Israel recently with the notion that they had an inviolable (God-given!) right to the land, and that ‘Arab’ equates with ‘vermin’ – straightforward old-school racism delivered with the same arrogant, shameless swagger that the good ole boys of Louisiana used to affect. That is the culture our taxes are defending. It’s like sending money to the Klan.

But beyond this, what really troubles me is the bigger picture. Like it or not, in the eyes of most of the world, America represents ‘The West’. So it is The West that is seen as supporting this war, despite all our high-handed talk about morality and democracy. I fear that all the civilisational achievements of The Enlightenment and Western Culture are being discredited – to the great glee of the mad Mullahs – by this flagrant hypocrisy. The war has no moral justification that I can see – but it doesn’t even have any pragmatic value either. It doesn’t make Kissingerian ‘Realpolitik’ sense; it just makes us look bad.

I’m sorry to burden you all with this. I know you’re busy and in varying degrees allergic to politics, but this is beyond politics. It’s us squandering the civilisational capital that we’ve built over generations. None of the questions in this letter are rhetorical: I really don’t get it and I wish that I did.

XXB

Krist Novoselic Comments on Israel-Palestine Conflict, Defends Vedder

“It is the knuckleheads on both sides that should be criticized and not the singer from a rock band”

Krist Novoselic Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images.

Krist Novoselic
Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images.

 

July 21, 2014

Former Nirvana bassist and political activist Krist Novoselic has voiced his support for Eddie Vedder’s recent anti-war statements in a post on his website. Over the past week, the Pearl Jam frontman has made several comments condemning war in general. When the Israeli media interpreted the statements as referring to that country’s ongoing conflict with Palestine, Vedder posted a statement to Pearl Jam’s website saying, “War hurts. It hurts no matter which sides the bombs are falling on.” Novoselic also interpreted the comments to be about Palestine and Israel and wrote to Vedder, “I stand with you my friend!!!”

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“The people of Palestine and Israel deserve peace and prosperity,” the bassist wrote. “It is time to stop repeating the same old arguments, dogma and hate speech. It is the knuckleheads on both sides that should be criticized and not the singer from a rock band. In addition, both sides need to make hard decisions about finding a settlement to the catastrophe that is Israel/Palestine.”

For most of his 550-word missive on the subject, Novoselic addressed the decades-long conflict between the two countries. He praised Israel for encouraging religious freedom in its country and acknowledging that millions of Palestinians feel that Israel has displaced them. But he also pontificated on the long-term effects of war, specifically between Israel and Palestine. “[Palestinian] Hamas’ policy of not recognizing Israel is a dead end,” he wrote at one juncture. Elsewhere, he wrote, “You can give any anecdote you want about how small Israel is in comparison to the rest of the Middle East but the sentiment is still there – Palestinians feel that their land was taken away.”

“Our world is connected as never before,” the bassist wrote. “People from all corners of the planet share culture and commerce at the click of a mouse. In contrast to this great convergence of humanity, Israel is building tall concrete walls while Palestinians fire rockets over them. There’s a shared recent history between these people, and I think there could be a shared future that’s more in tune with what’s going on with our ever-connected universe.”

Novoselic compared the conflict to the way Ireland settled “the troubles” of the 1960s in Ireland, and how the “19th Century idea” of Yugoslavia ultimately fell apart. “In both these cases, a resolution of the conflict was buttressed by the promise of the stability needed for prosperity to happen,” wrote Novoselic, who was born to immigrants from Croatia, a country that was part of Yugoslavia until the early Nineties.

“Thank you Eddie Vedder for speaking up for peace in our world,” Novoselic wrote. “Eddie has gotten some criticism over comments he made about the conflict between the Palestinians and Israelis. That situation has been messed up for so long, it is no wonder that even mentioning it is toxic. Let’s face it, the relationship between the Palestinians and the Israelis is a disaster! I don’t know how many times I have heard the same explanations and excuses and it matters not, there is a continuing catastrophe between those two peoples.”

Most recently, Vedder spoke against war at his July 18th solo concert in Portugal, where he also played what he called “the most powerful song ever written,” John Lennon’s “Imagine.” “If you’re anti-war it doesn’t mean you are ‘pro’ one side or the other in a conflict,” he said.

Pearl Jam’s U.S. Tour Dates

Eddie Vedder - Frontman of Pearl Jam

Eddie Vedder – Frontman of Pearl Jam / Photo Jason Oxenham/Getty Images

Pearl Jam have announced a 12-city October U.S. tour, following a summer trek to Europe, that includes their appearance at Austin City Limits Music Festival. Tickets for the shows go on sale May 30th.

Last year, the group put out their 10th studio album, Lightning Bolt, which frontman Eddie Vedder kvelled about in an interview with Rolling Stone. “I say this in the least-competitive way possible, but we’re trying to make not just the best Pearl Jam record, but just the best record,” the singer said. “It’s about getting to the next level of communication, or just trying to crack a code into some higher plane of playing music.”

Outside of the world of Pearl Jam, the group’s guitarist Mike McCready wrote an article for Rolling Stone about how Kiss had inspired him growing up, as the makeup-faced hard rockers were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Moreover, he revealed that he wasn’t the only member of his band to garner inspiration from the group. “Pearl Jam sit down and have conversations about Kiss all the time on tour,” he wrote. “My band used to do ‘C’Mon and Love Me.’ Matt Cameron played in a Kiss tribute band when he was 14. They got so big around San Diego that they got a cease-and-desist order from Casablanca Records. Jeff Ament used to play ‘She’ in his band Deranged Diction. There’s a Kiss through-line to a lot of the music that came out of Seattle, and it hasn’t been talked about a lot.”

Via Rolling Stone Mag

Pearl Jam U.S. tour dates:
10/1 Cincinnati, OH – U.S. Bank Arena
10/3 St. Louis, MO – Scottrade Center
10/4 – 10/5 Austin, TX – Austin City Limits
10/8 Tulsa, OK – BOK Center
10/9 Lincoln, NE – Pinnacle Bank Arena
10/10 – 10/12 Austin, TX – Austin City Limits
10/14 Memphis, TN – FedEx Forum
10/16 Detroit, MI – Joe Louis Arena
10/17 Moline, IL – iWireless Center
10/19 St. Paul, NM – Xcel Energy Center
10/20 Milwaukee, WI – BMO Harris Bradley Center
10/22 Denver, CO – Pepsi Center

Watch: Alice In Chains – Layne Staley’s Last Show (7-3-96) (Full Concert)

Layne Thomas Staley (August 22, 1967 – April 5, 2002)was an American musician who served as the lead singer and co-songwriter of the rock band Alice in Chains, which he co-founded along with guitarist Jerry Cantrell in Seattle, Washington in 1987. Alice in Chains rose to international fame as part of the grunge movement of the early 1990s. The band became known for his distinct vocal style, as well as the harmonized vocals between him and Cantrell. Staley was also a member of the supergroups Mad Season and Class of ’99. By mid-1996, Staley would be out of the public spotlight, never to perform live again. Staley also struggled throughout his adult life with depression and a severe drug addiction, culminating with his death on April 5, 2002.

Layne Staley playing with Alice in Chains at The Channel in Boston, MA. 27 November 1992 - Photo: Rex Aran Emrick

Layne Staley playing with Alice in Chains at The Channel in Boston, MA.
27 November 1992 –
Photo: Rex Aran Emrick

 

Alice in Chains released their debut album Facelift on August 21, 1990, shaping the band’s signature style. The second single, “Man in the Box”, with lyrics written by Staley, became a huge hit. “Man in the Box” is widely recognized for its distinctive “wordless opening melody, where Layne Staley’s peculiar, tensed-throat vocals are matched in unison with an effects-laden guitar” followed by “portentous lines like: ‘Jesus Christ/Deny your maker’ and ‘He who tries/Will be wasted’ with Cantrell’s drier, and less-urgent voice.”

Facelift has since been certified double platinum by the RIAA for sales of two million copies in the United States. The band toured in support of the album for two years before releasing the acoustic EP Sap in early 1992. In September 1992, Alice in Chains released Dirt. The critically acclaimed album, also the band’s most successful, debuted at number six on the Billboard 200, and was certified quadruple platinum. During the Dirt tour (in 1992), Layne saved Mike’s life after he had overdosed. The band did not tour in support of Dirt for very long, because of Staley’s drug addiction. While touring, Starr left the band for personal reasons and was replaced by Mike Inez.

In his last interview, given on December 20, 2001 roughly four months before his death, Staley admitted, “I know I’m near death, I did crack and heroin for years. I never wanted to end my life this way.” Staley’s physical appearance had become even worse than before: he had lost several teeth, his skin was sickly pale, and he was severely emaciated. In the same interview Staley spoke of the damage caused by his heroin addiction:

“I’m not using drugs to get high like many people think. I know I made a big mistake when I started using this shit. It’s a very difficult thing to explain. My liver is not functioning, and I’m throwing up all the time and shitting my pants. The pain is more than you can handle. It’s the worst pain in the world. Dope sick hurts the entire body.”

As far as published reports are concerned, such as Blender’s “We Left Him Alone”, close friends such as Matt Fox have said, “If no one heard from him for weeks, it wasn’t unusual.” Further in the article, reporter Pat Kearney provides a glimpse into Staley’s daily life and public routine:

“It appears that Staley’s last few weeks were typically empty. According to an employee of the Rainbow, a neighborhood bar close to Staley’s condo, the singer was a frequent patron, stopping by at least once a week. ‘He minded his own business,’ said the employee, who wished to remain anonymous. Staley would never buy anything to drink, the employee said, but would simply sit at a small table in the back corner of the bar and ‘nod off. We just left him alone’.”

Staley’s close friend Mark Lanegan had much of the same to say with respect to Staley’s isolation: “He didn’t speak to anybody as of late… It’s been a few months since I talked to him. But for us to not talk for a few months is par for the course.”

Cold’s song “The Day Seattle Died” (from the 2003 album, Year of the Spider) was an ode to Staley, as well as Kurt Cobain, who were both figureheads of the grunge movement. In addition, Staind featured a song called “Layne” in memory to the singer on the 2003 album, 14 Shades of Grey. Eddie Vedder, lead singer of Pearl Jam, also recorded a song eulogizing Staley, titled “4/20/02” (the day Vedder heard the news and subsequently wrote the song). The song featured only Vedder singing and playing the guitar in a ukulele-inspired tuning, and was released as a hidden track on Pearl Jam’s 2003 B-sides and rarities album, Lost Dogs, roughly four minutes and twenty seconds after the conclusion of the final listed song, “Bee Girl”. Eddie Vedder’s tone in the song “4/20/02” was very dark and heartbreaking considering that he was among one of Layne’s friends (as stated within the song for “lonesome friend”); One can hear how he truly felt about Layne Staley’s death in this song, not only aiming to other listeners to avoid ever “using” drugs, but he had also aimed this song to all of those “who sing just like [Layne]” (during the time when a lot of vocalists were aiming to imitate Layne Staley’s singing style) ending the song with the lines: “So sing just like him/f—ers/It won’t offend him/just me/Because he’s dead.”

Sources: Wikipedia