Noel Gallagher To Return With New Album Chasing Yesterday In March

Former Oasis man confirms Johnny Marr and lost of sax solos set for second High Flying Birds LP as he post first single online.

Former Oasis man confirms Johnny Marr and lost of sax solos set for second High Flying Birds LP as he post first single online.

 

FOR A MAN WHO ONCE DECLARED he doesn’t own a computer and won’t use email, Noel Gallagher was very busy online this afternoon (October 13) announcing his return to music.

The erstwhile Oasis leader and his High Flying Birds revealed plans for his second solo album, Chasing Yesterday during a Q&A session hosted on Facebook, before posting its first fruits onto Youtube. The record will be with us on March 2, but first single In The Heart Of The Moment – below – is out next month (November 17) complete with B-side Do The Damage.

Chasing Yesterday is the first full album Gallagher has produced himself, but full creative control had its drawbacks it seems. “It was a major pain in the arse,” he explained. “It’s not that I’ve ever had people telling me what to write or what direction to go in, but managing sessions from one end of the week to the other proved extremely difficult. I had all these people looking at me and saying, ‘Right, what are we doing today?’ I was making the whole thing up as I went along.”

 

“I know I’m going to be accused of sax crimes. But fuck it. There’s nobody to tell me not to do it.”

Noel Gallagher

 

One recipient of this approach was Johnny Marr, who guests on Ballad Of The Mighty I, and apparently joined in the chaotic spirit of things by improvising his guitar parts. “I tried to get him to play on the last album but it never happened,” noted Gallagher. “So when I put this track together and knew he would be perfect for it I called him and asked if I could send him the rough mix. He said: ‘No, I don’t want to hear it. I’m just going to react to it on the day.’ He didn’t even want any pointers. Well, that was brave of him. He just arrived with two guitars and a bag of effects pedals. And I have to say, he’s unbelievable. He’s way up there, on another level to the rest of us. The result is a burst of energy that helped make Mighty I one of the best songs I’ve ever written.”

However, that’s not the only new element this freeform approach has yielded, as seasoned Oasis-watchers will be surprised to learn that Chasing Yesterday boasts several saxophone solos. “I know I’m going to be accused of sax crimes,” admitted Gallagher. “But fuck it. There’s nobody to tell me not to do it. And when you listen to that saxophone, please, don’t think about the guy from Spandau Ballet.”

An arena tour will take place March next year, with tickets going on sale this Friday at 9am (BST). See Aloud.com for full details. There’s no word yet on whether a touring saxophonist has been booked.

 

 

Rory Gallagher: Irish Guitar Maestro

Rory Gallagher

Rory Gallagher

The much-admired Irish guitar maestro Rory Gallagher, is a player whose fans include Johnny Marr, The Edge and Brian May.

William Rory Gallagher; 2 March 1948 – 14 June 1995) was an Irish blues-rock multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, and bandleader. Born in Ballyshannon, County Donegal, and raised in Cork, Gallagher recorded solo albums throughout the 1970s and 1980s, after forming the band Taste during the late 1960s. He was a talented guitarist known for his charismatic performances and dedication to his craft. Gallagher’s albums have sold in excess of 30 million copies worldwide.

Gallagher received a liver transplant in 1995, but died of complications later that year in London, UK at the age of 47.

First coming to notice with Cork’s blues-rockers Taste in the late ’60s, his solo recording career started in earnest in 1971 with the release of his reflective, self-titled debut. Running concurrently with the hard-gigging guitarist’s incessant touring – including, of course, his fondly-recalled stop-offs in Belfast as The Troubles raged – his discography would include such outstanding works as Irish Tour ’74, Calling Card and Live In Europe. Sadly, Gallagher would die in 1995, but thanks to his estate, archival sets have continued to sate fans’ appetites with such packages as 1999’s BBC Sessions and 2013’s hard boiled graphic novel/album package Kickback City.

Influences he discovered, and cited as he progressed, included Woody Guthrie, Big Bill Broonzy, and Lead Belly. Initially, Gallagher struck out after just an acoustic sound. Singing and later using a brace for his harmonica, Gallagher taught himself to play slide guitar. Further, throughout the next few years of his musical development, Gallagher began learning to play alto saxophone, bass, mandolin, banjo, and the coral sitar with varying degrees of proficiency. By his mid-teens, he began experimenting heavily with different blues styles.

In 2003, Wheels Within Wheels, a collection of acoustic tracks, was released posthumously by Gallagher’s brother Donal Gallagher. Collaborators on this album included Bert Jansch, Martin Carthy, The Dubliners, Spanish flamenco guitarist Juan Martin and Lonnie Donegan.

Many modern day musicians, including The Edge from U2, Slash of Guns N’ Roses, Johnny Marr of the Smiths, Davy Knowles, Janick Gers of Iron Maiden, James Dean Bradfield of Manic Street Preachers, Glenn Tipton of Judas Priest, Vivian Campbell of Def Leppard, Gary Moore and Joe Bonamassa, cite Gallagher as an inspiration in their formative musical years.

Brian May, lead guitarist of Queen, relates: “so these couple of kids come up, who’s me and my mate, and say ‘How do you get your sound Mr. Gallagher?’ and he sits and tells us. So I owe Rory Gallagher my sound.” In 2010, Gallagher was ranked No. 42 on Gibson.com’s List of their Top 50 Guitarists of All Time. Gallagher was also listed on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time, ranked at 57th place.

And here, if you’re in need of inspiration, is a powerful dose of the man himself…

 

Rory Gallagher – Shadow Play – TV Show Germany

 

Rory Gallagher –  The Beat Club Sessions – 1971-1972

 

Rory Gallagher – 1976 – Live at Rockpalast (Cologne)