Breaking news US closes Bagram detention center in Afghanistan

ARCHIVE PHOTO: Released Afghan prisoners raise their hands in prayer as the United States-led military released 20 Afghan prisoners from its Bagram Air Field detention centre, north of Kabul (AFP Photo / Farzana Wahidy)

ARCHIVE PHOTO: Released Afghan prisoners raise their hands in prayer as the United States-led military released 20 Afghan prisoners from its Bagram Air Field detention centre, north of Kabul (AFP Photo / Farzana Wahidy)

RT Breaking News

The US Defense Department announced it has closed the Bagram detention center and now has zero detainees in its custody in Afghanistan, Reuters reported.

Although the United States transferred control over Bagram to the Afghans back in 2013, the detention center became infamous due the harsh treatment some of the detainees received while in American custody. At one point, it was double the size of the controversial Guantanamo Bay prison complex in Cuba.

The facility’s closure comes just one day after the Senate released its long-awaited torture report, which described the gruesome tactics deployed by the CIA against terror suspects in the wake of the September 11 attacks.

READ MORE: Senate accuses CIA of torturing prisoners, overstepping legal boundaries

Two of the most infamous cases involved prisoners named Habibullah and Dilawar, whose abuse was chronicled by The New York Times in 2005. Dilawar – who was chained to the top of his cell for days by the time he died – was brutally beaten and passed away in 2002.

“At the interrogators’ behest, a guard tried to force the young man to his knees. But his legs, which had been pummeled by guards for several days, could no longer bend,” wrote Tim Golden in the Times.

“An interrogator told Mr. Dilawar that he could see a doctor after they finished with him. When he was finally sent back to his cell, though, the guards were instructed only to chain the prisoner back to the ceiling.”

Habibullah, who died just a few days before Dilawar, was also chained to the ceiling and beaten. The Times noted that he was struck more than 100 times in a 24-hour period.

READ MORE: ‘The Other Guantanamo’ – Indefinite detention at Bagram Air Force Base

As recently as this past September, there were still questions about the fate of the detainees being held at Bagram. It was unclear how many people remained in American custody, but with the US gradually drawing down its war in Afghanistan, officials said the legal authority allowing them to continue holding prisoners was about to expire.

“We’ve got to resolve their fate by either returning them to their home country or turning them over to the Afghans for prosecution or any other number of ways that the Department of Defense has to resolve,” said Brigadier General Patrick Reinert, the commanding general of the United States Army Reserve Legal Command, at the time. “Until the country provides assurances, the individual cannot be transferred.”

US Torture Report & the Release of Detainees from GITMO – What it Means for the Future of US Terror Policy

Tonight’s “Everything You Need to Know” panel discusses the release of six Guantanamo Bay detainees, and what implications the US Terror Report will have on GITMO and terrorism combat tactics. Alka Pradhan of Reprieve US, CODEPINK’s Media Benjamin, and retired colonel, Ann Wright, debate the issue.
Author William Black talks about falling global oil prices that are impacting on economies worldwide. Satanic Temple spokesman Lucien Greaves examines religion and equal rights. Plus our “Your Take My Take” on geeky science.

Fault Lines – Life after Guantanamo (Documentary TV)

 

President Obama has not made good on his promise to close Guantanamo Bay prison, which he made via an executive order he signed on his first full day in office. Since then, the U.S. Congress has raised the political price of transferring detainees—even those held without charges and already cleared for release.

In 2013, some of the detained men were on hunger strike as their loved ones continued their fight for a life after Guantanamo. Several others who were formerly detained now live in Yemen. Have they been tempted to “return to the battlefield” as Congress warns? Did years of detention, isolation and torture make them want to seek revenge against the United States? And how are they rebuilding their lives?

Fault Lines travels to Yemen to explore the consequences of the U.S. policy of indefinite detention.


Credits:

Executive Producer: Mathieu Skene, Correspondent: Wab Kinew @wabkinew, Producer: Andrea Schmidt @whatescapes, Producer (Yemen): Nasser Arrabyee @narrabyee,Director of Photography: Saeed Taji Farouky @saeedtaji (Yemen), Singeli Agnew @singeli (DC), Thierry Humeau @telecamfilms, Joel Van Haren @joelvanharen, Editor: Adrienne Haspel @adihaspel, Associate Producers: Abdulai Bah @africandobah, Nicole Salazar @nicolesalazar, Translation: Rabyaah Althaibani @Rabyaah, Omar Duwaji @mideasternist, Research & Production Assistance: Omar Duwaji @mideasternist, Ana Giraldo Wingler @awanderingorill, Jonathan Klett @jonathanklett, Mark Scialla @markscialla
Special Thanks to David Remes (@remesdh) who appeared in the film.

 

 

 

Published on Aug 7, 2014

Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/Documentary.TVI
For more documentary video’s : http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2y7f…

 

Never charged with the crime, Mohammed Odani spent almost nine years in prison. He is the last detainee from Guantanamo Bay Prison to have returned home to live in Yemen.
In this episode, Fault Lines travelled to Yemen to ask what the consequences of America’s policy of indefinite detention have been and to find out what life is like there, after Guantanamo.
Mohammed was studying in Pakistan when the aftershocks of September 11th began reverberating around the world. One night in the spring of 2002, he was visiting a student house when Pakistani authorities raided it.
He was arrested, along with more than a dozen others. Two months later, the Pakistanis turned Mohammed over to American forces.
Farouque Ali Akmed had also travelled abroad to teach Koran. Farouque spent eight years at Guantanamo. Like Mohammed, he denies having been involved in attacks on US targets or terrorism of any kind.
Though they labeled him in enemy combatant and said he was associated with Al-Qaeda, the United States never charged him with anything either. As bad as the physical torture was, they say it was nothing compared to torment of being wrongly imprisoned.

Judge Allows Military to Force-Feed Guantánamo Detainee

 

The New York Times

Judge Gladys Kessler said ruling that she faced “an anguishing Hobson’s choice” involving the detainee, Jihad Ahmed Mujstafa Diyab: to keep the order in place as the legal fight continues and risk that he dies, or to lift it and allow the military to take steps to keep him alive using procedures that inflict “unnecessary” suffering.

“The court simply cannot let Mr. Dhiab die,” she wrote, using an alternate spelling for the detainee’s name.

The force-feeding procedure involves strapping a detainee into a restraint chair and inserting a tube through his nose and down his throat. Liquid nutritional supplement is then poured into his stomach.

Mr. Diyab, 42, a Syrian who has been held without charges at Guantánamo for nearly 12 years, was recommended for transfer in 2009-10 by a task force…..

 

The files describes Mr. Diyab as a member of a group of Syrians who fled to Afghanistan in 2000 after escaping a Syrian government crackdown on terrorist cells. He was sentenced to death in Syria, it said, for “unspecified political crimes,” which it speculates was “probably for his terrorist activities in Syria,” which it does not detail.

“I am stunned that the Department of Defense refused to agree to the reasonable compromise Mr. Diyab proposed,” said Jon Eisenberg, another lawyer for Mr. Diyab, who has appeared on his behalf before Judge Kessler. “But the real responsibility lies at the door of President Obama, who utters lofty words but fails to stop the terrible things that are happening at Guantánamo Bay on his watch.”

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE IN THE NEW YORK TIMES

BBC: Guantánamo inmate vomited blood after force-feeding, documents show

 

Ahmed Rabbani held without charge for more than 10 years
• New filing details force-feeding regime in hunger strike
US forced to acknowledge secret tapes of force-feedings

theguardian.com, Thursday 22 May 2014 17.19 EDT

 

Guantanamo Bay Facility Continues To Serve As Detention Center For War Detainees

A restraint chair used to force-feed detainees on hunger strike at Guantánamo Bay.New documents filed in a federal court in Washington have revealed that a Guantánamo Bay detainee contracted a chest infection as a result of force-feeding, leading him to repeatedly vomit blood.

 

See video published by The Guardian – Warning: some viewers may find these images distressing:

                                            Link to video: Yasiin Bey (aka Mos Def) force-fed under standard Guantánamo Bay procedure

 

The filing on Thursday came a day after a federal court forced the government to reveal that it has secretly recorded dozens of force-feedings of one hunger-striking Guantánamo detainee, raising the possibility that the US military may have similar films of other detainees.

The fresh documents, filed in the US district court for the District of Columbia, relate to a detainee named Ahmed Rabbani, a Pakistani father of three who has been held without charge for more than a decade.

In the papers, Rabbani describes through his lawyer how a string of force-feedings with improperly inserted feeding tubes caused him to develop pain in his chest and left him with a chest infection.

He developed pain after a tube was wrongly inserted multiple times, he says. The next day, he asked to be granted a day’s rest. The request was ignored, he says, and the following day he “vomited blood on himself three or four times” before losing consciousness. He was still taken to the feeding chair.

After repeated bouts of vomiting, Rabbani was checked by a nurse and told he would not be fed because he had an infection.

In the document, Rabbani’s lawyer tells how his client reported several botched attempts at force feeding. On one occasion, the feeding tube turned so it was facing up, rather than down his throat, leading Rabbani to feel like it was “pushed up into [his] brain”. On another, he could not breathe as his airways were blocked by the feeding liquid “pooling in his throat”.

Another attempt left him “screaming in pain”, he said.

Earlier this week, lawyers for Rabbani asked the court to ensure that videos of his force-feeding and forcible cell extraction (FCE) procedures, which are used against detainees who refuse to eat, were preserved. His case echoes that of Abu Wa’el Dhiab, a Syrian whose force-feeding was halted on the orders of district judge Gladys Kessler on Wednesday, after his lawyers applied to the court to have video tapes of his force-feeding preserved.

Cori Crider, Reprieve strategic director and counsel for Rabbani, said: “Because of a peaceful protest aimed at securing basic legal rights, my client has been put through a painful, near-daily ordeal.

“All this would be unnecessary if the [Obama] administration would just follow through on its promise to close the prison.”

 

A military doctor holds a feeding tube used to feed detainees on hunger strike at Guantánamo. Photograph: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A military doctor holds a feeding tube used to feed detainees on hunger strike at Guantánamo. Photograph: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

 

One of Dhiab’s attorneys, Jon Eisenberg, said the US government had thousands of tapes detailing feeding and cell extraction conditions of the other detainees.

More than 100 Guantánamo detainees took part in a 2013 hunger strike. There are currently 154 detainees at Guantánamo, down from a peak figure of nearly 800.

There is no public record of how many have been on hunger strike, nor how many have been videotaped while being forcibly fed or removed from their cells for force-feedings.

Red Hot Chili Peppers UPSET that their music was used to torture Guantánamo Bay prisoners

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Red Hot Chili Peppers drummer Chad Smith has vented his anger at US authorities after hearing that his band’s music was allegedly used to torture prisoners in Guantánamo Bay.

US officials speaking anonymously to Al Jazeera confirmed detailed techniques used by the CIA during the George Bush administration following the declassification process for the report on its own “enhanced interrogation” procedures used after September 11.

Among the techniques used to torture those suspected of being terrorists was exposure to the Californian band on repeat.

Speaking to Smith said: “I’ve heard that they use more… like, hard rock, metal… Our music’s positive man, it’s supposed to make people feel good and that’s… it’s very upsetting to me, I don’t like that at all. It’s bullshit.

“Maybe some people think our music’s annoying, I don’t care, but you know… (they) shouldn’t do that. They shouldn’t be doing any of that shit.”

One specific segment of the Senate Intelligence Committee report allegedly states that a suspect, named as Zayn al-Abidin Muhammad Husayn Abu Zubaydah, was subjected to the technique at a black site prison out of Guantánamo Bay between May and July in 2002.

Red Hot Chili Peppers music used to torture prisoners in Guantánamo Bay.

2014RedHotChiliPeppersGetty_467323121_13022014_0

Red Hot Chili Peppers music used to torture prisoners in Guantánamo Bay.

US officials speaking anonymously to Al Jazeera confirmed details techniques used by the CIA during the George Bush administration following the declassification process for the report on its own “enhanced interrogation” procedures used after September 11. Among the techniques used to torture those suspected of being terrorists was exposure to the Californian band on repeat.

One specific segment of the Senate Intelligence Committee report states that a suspect, named as Zayn al-Abidin Muhammad Husayn Abu Zubaydah, was subjected to the technique at a black site prison out of Guantánamo Bay between May and July in 2002.

The report also reveals the fact that Abu Zubaydah was stuffed into a pet crate and was shackled by his wrists to the ceiling of his cell as well as being subjected to an endless loop of loud music.

Earlier this year, industrial band Skinny Puppy revealed that they invoiced the US government after finding out that their music had allegedly been used as a ‘torture device’ at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp.