Project Artist – Who Are You? What Moves You? What’s Your Approach? What’s Your Dream?

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The films you take. The rhymes you make. A word. A scene. What makes you ‘you’? Take part in a journey where there are no wrong answers, just infinite perspectives. Join digital artist, Cedric Kiefer in a global art project that explores self-identity.

 

How Do We Make Our Mark?  Explore The Art Projects

 

The Future Is Leaving – Make Our Mark

God Is An Astronaut: Discography

Astronaut @ Sistine Chapel

Astronaut @ Sistine Chapel

Note: On December 28, 2012, God Is An Astronaut announced (in their official website) that they will be taking a short break to complete the new album, and will have some updates on its progress, release date and news on upcoming touring for mid 2013 in the coming weeks and months.

DISCOGRAPHY

9TAgeOfTheFifthSun17May2010
1. Worlds in Collision
2. In the Distance Fading
3. Lost Kingdom
4. Golden Sky
5. Dark Rift
6. Parallel Highway
7. Shining Through
8. Age of the Fifth Sun
9. Paradise Remains

 

 

 

 

10TGIAA_17Nov2008
1. Shadows
2. Post Mortem
3. Echoes
4. Snowfall
5. First Day of Sun
6. No Return
7. Zodiac
8. Remaining Light
9. Shores of Orion
10. Loss

 

 

 

9TFarFromRefuge_18July2007
1. Radau
2. Far from Refuge
3. Sunrise in Aries
4. Grace Descending
5. New Years End
6. Darkfall
7. Tempus Horizon
8. Lateral Noise
9. Beyond the Dying Light

 

 

 

 

10T_EndOfTheBeginning
1. The End of the Beginning
2. From Dust to the Beyond
3. Ascend to Oblivion
4. Coda
5. Remembrance
6. Point Pleasant
7. Fall from the Stars
8. Twilight
9. Coma
10. Route 666
11. Lost Symphony

 

 

 

AMomentofStillness1612web
1. Frozen Twilight
2. A Moment of Stillness
3. Forever Lost (Reprise)
4. Elysian Fields
5. Crystal Canyon
6. Endless Dream
7. Empyrean Glow
8. Sweet Deliverance
9. Dark Solstice

Tom Waits and Anton Corbijn to Release a Collaborative Photographic Book “Waits/Corbijn ’77-’11”

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WAITS/CORBIJN ‘77-‘11, a collector’s edition linen slipcase book limited to 6,600 copies, is scheduled for a May 8th release in US and Europe by renowned German publisher Schirmer-Mosel. The coffee table art book not only features over 200 pages of Waits’ portraits taken by Corbijn over four decades, but also includes over 50 pages of the first published collection of musings and photographs taken by Waits himself. The linen bound book has introductions written by film director Jim Jarmusch, and the longtime music critic Robert Christgau.

WAITS/CORBIJN ‘77-’11 is the chronicle of an artistic collaboration that reaches back more than 35 years, to those first black-and-white photographs of Tom Waits taken by a young Anton Corbijn in Holland in 1977. Corbijn would go on to acclaim for his iconic enigmatic portraits of musicians and other artists—from U2 and Miles Davis to Robert De Niro and Clint Eastwood to Damien Hirst and Gerhard Richter—also becoming a designer, a pioneer in music video and more recently, an award-winning director of feature films. By 1977, Tom Waits was already known world-wide for a series of stunning, timeless albums, filled with songs of a noir-tinged Los Angeles that owed as much to writers like John Fante and Jack Kerouac as it did to jazz, blues and tin-pan alley that had soaked into Waits’ pores from childhood. Ahead of Waits lay his partnership with Kathleen Brennan—leading to such touchstone recordings as Rain Dogs and Mule Variations—his film work with the likes of Francis Ford Coppola and Jim Jarmusch, and his stage projects with legendary director Robert Wilson.

In those first photographs, then, are the seeds of these two intertwined careers, feeding off each other. Waits’ vibrant persona helped Corbijn define his narrative, cinematic style of still photography: images that felt as if you were coming in on the middle of some unfolding drama. Corbijn complimented Waits’ theatrical side in a way that synced beautifully with the experimental music he was making with Brennan. “Anton picks up a small black box, points it at you and all the leaves fall from the trees. The shadows now are long and scary, the house looks completely abandoned and I look like a handsome… undertaker. I love working with Anton, he’s someone with a real point of view. Believe me, I won’t go jumping off rocks wearing only a Dracula cape for just anyone,” Waits says.
Waits’ own photography, collected here for the first time under the title “Curiosities,” gives a visual handle to the artistic intelligence millions of fans know only through his music.

Photographs of Tom Waits by Anton Corbijn, photographs by Tom Waits of the vivid quotidian, stretching down through the years and presented for the first time in a beautiful clothbound book; side by side, these 226 images record one of the longest and most fruitful collaborations in the careers of both artists. “It’s rare”, Corbijn says, “to take photographs of someone over a 30+ year period. Our work together developed totally organically and that’s a beauty in itself. We are very serious about our work but when it comes to working together, we’re like children resisting maturity. It’s liberating and a much needed legal drug.”

Waits/Corbijn ’77-‘11
Photographs by Anton Corbijn
Curiosities by Tom Waits
Texts by Jim Jarmusch and Robert Christgau
Limited edition of 6.600 w/slipcase
272 pages, 226 color and duotone plates
ISBN 978-3-8296-0555-7

Sources: Tom Waits-Anton Corbijn, Tom Waits news, Wiki

Blending of Art & Music: Best Creative Album Covers

Musicians Know That Ears Have Eyes

Music and art go hand in hand. And the best way to get a potential buyer’s attention is with an eye catching album cover. We all know you can’t just judge a book by it’s cover but it doesn’t hurt to give CD and LP covers a spin based off a beautiful piece of art.

Below we present several excellent examples of beautiful, creative and impressive album covers that will certainly inspire you to head down to the local record shop and start browsing through records and labels. We have tried to address various cover designs and present both CD covers and LP covers, however some excellent album covers are definitely missing. Please let us know about them in the comments to the post!

Here we are showing a few…

Gojira - L'Enfant Sauvage

Gojira – L’Enfant Sauvage / See video

Sam's Town - The Killers

Sam’s Town – The Killers. Cover art is by Anton Corbijn and features model and singer Felice LaZae.

Dikers - Casi nunca llueve

Dikers – Casi nunca llueve

Morphine - Cure For Pain / Album cover by Morphine

Morphine – Cure For Pain / Album cover by Morphine

Hertzainak - Zuzenean 91-01-19

Hertzainak – Zuzenean 19-01-91

Tom Waits - Rain Dogs

Tom Waits – Rain Dogs. The cover photograph is one of a series taken by the Swedish photographer Anders Petersen at Café Lehmitz (a café near the Hamburg red-light boulevard Reeperbahn) in the late 1960s. The man and woman depicted on the cover are called Rose and Lily.

The Smiths

The Smiths. The group’s cover artwork had a distinctive visual style and often featured images of film and pop stars, usually in duotone. Design was by Morrissey and Rough Trade art coordinator Jo Slee.

Eddie Vedder - Ukulele Songs

Eddie Vedder – Ukulele Songs. The cover art features a photograph of the sculptural work “The Lost Correspondent” by Jason deCaires Taylor. The sculpture is underwater with many others at a dive site called Moliniere Bay – Underwater Sculpture Park, Grenada.

Pearl Jam Live - On Ten Legs

Pearl Jam Live – On Ten Legs. See video of Pearl Jam on Ten Legs

Zain - XXI Mendeko Piratak

Zain – XXI Mendeko Piratak

Apocalyptica - End of Me / Cover art by Apocalyptica

Apocalyptica – End of Me / Cover art by Apocalyptica

Beatles - Tribute to Kiss

Beatles – Tribute to Kiss

The Strokes - Is this It.. Cover art by Colin Lane

The Strokes – Is this It.. Cover art by Colin Lane

Willis Drummond - A ala B

Willis Drummond – A ala B / Cover art by Ramon M.Zabalegi + Inaki Rifaterra + Nagore Legorreta

The Clash - London Calling. Cover art  of an infuriated Paul Simonon, smashing his bass. By Pennie Smith

The Clash – London Calling. Cover art of an infuriated Paul Simonon, smashing his bass. By Pennie Smith

Ryan Bingham - Tomorrowland

Ryan Bingham – Tomorrowland. Cover photos (front & back) by Ryan’s wife Anna Axster. Tomorrowland is on their own label. See video about the album cover

Korn - Untouchables

Korn – Untouchables

Joy Division - Unknown Pleasures / Cover art by Peter Saville

Joy Division – Unknown Pleasures / Cover art by Peter Saville


Breathe - Crossing The Delaware

Breathe – Crossing The Delaware

Eskorbuto - Maldito Pais

Eskorbuto – Maldito Pais

Blondie - Rock Bird

Blondie – Rock Bird

The Killers - Mr Brightside

The Killers – Mr Brightside

U2 - War

U2 – War

Matthew Ryan: In The Dusk of Everything

Matthew Ryan: In The Dusk of Everything

Pearl Jam - Rearview Mirror

Pearl Jam – Rearview Mirror

Battles - Mirrored

Battles – Mirrored

Squarepusher - Ufabulum

Squarepusher – Ufabulum

Bloom - Beach House

Bloom – Beach House

Radiohead - OK Computer / Cover art  is a collage of images and text created by Stanley Donwood and Yorke, credited under the pseudonym "The White Chocolate Farm."  The jazz fusion of Miles Davis and and political writings of Noam Chomsky influenced OK Computer.

Radiohead – OK Computer / Cover art is a collage of images and text created by Stanley Donwood and Yorke, credited under the pseudonym “The White Chocolate Farm.” The jazz fusion of Miles Davis and political writings of Noam Chomsky influenced OK Computer.

INXS Platinium - Greatest Hits

INXS Platinium – Greatest Hits

Ratatat - LP4

Ratatat – LP4

The Rolling Stones - Sticky Fingers.  Artwork was conceived by Andy Warhol, photography was by Billy Name and design by Craig Braun.

The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers. Artwork was conceived by Andy Warhol, photography was by Billy Name and design by Craig Braun.

Nirvana - Nevermind. Cover art by Robbert Fisher.

Nirvana – Nevermind. Cover art by Robbert Fisher.

Led Zeppelin - Physical Graffiti

Led Zeppelin – Physical Graffiti

Pink Floyd - Tree Of Half Life. Cover art by Storm Thorgerson

Pink Floyd – Tree Of Half Life. Cover art by Storm Thorgerson

Gojira in India – Pictures

Photo Credits: Mario Duplantier + Anne Deguehegny © Gojira

While others have Paris and Rome, we’ll always have Brooklyn.

The Grand Army Plaza – Brooklyn, NYC

While others have Paris and Rome, we’ll always have Brooklyn. But justifiable pride of place should not make us reluctant to look deeper and examine serious challenges to Brooklyn’s well being. ~ Marilyn Gelber

There’s no shortage of pride in Brooklyn. Whether you’re a fan of pizza from Di Fara’s, Spumoni Gardens, Roberta’s or Lucali’s; or you claim to know where to find the very best taco and dim sum in Sunset Park, the next big music act out of Bushwick or Williamsburg, or the block in Dyker Heights with the most stunning Christmas lights—it’s pride in the vitality and character of our communities, their rich history, the perfect scale and look of our old buildings and the sharp elbows of the new ones, which adds up to the always fascinating and seldom dull landscape of 70 distinct neighborhoods that is Brooklyn.

While others have Paris and Rome, we’ll always have Brooklyn — a borough of bridges, brownstones, and boardwalks; a home with endless wonders to explore, just a walk or subway ride away.

But justifiable pride of place should not make us reluctant to look deeper and examine serious challenges to Brooklyn’s well being.

While Brooklyn is booming—rapidly rivaling our neighbor across the river as the place to live and work—it’s still home to sky -high poverty rates, too many low-performing schools, under resourced public housing developments, shaky health facilities, young people out of school and out of work, and a tragically large number of seniors barely getting by.

When we launched the Brooklyn Community Foundation just over two years ago, we wanted to be a force for good. We wanted to bring resources and ideas to strengthen communities and engage Brooklynites in giving and service to others. But we knew that in order to do this we needed to help Brooklynites look through a more accurate lens on issues and trends in the borough to help us all be more deeply informed about the place we live: what’s affecting our neighborhood schools, how local businesses are faring in this economy, and how are decisions being made about future development. Francis Bacon was right: Nam et ipsa scientia potestas est. Knowledge is power.

So our sights were set on generating more easily accessible local information—data, reporting, analysis—to empower Brooklynites to get active and be part of making Brooklyn better for all who live here.

To lay the groundwork for an information renaissance in Brooklyn, we took two major steps. First, we funded and created the Center for the Study of Brooklyn at Brooklyn College, a research institute solely focused on Brooklyn. Second, we teamed up with City Limits to get a grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation to build the Brooklyn Bureau, a new source of serious investigative journalism for all of Brooklyn.

Right now in the media there are two Brooklyns: the Brooklyn of artisanal cheese shops and the Brooklyn of murder and mayhem.

While we love that there’s no shortage of ink on how “cool” Brooklyn is, there’s an egregious lack of reporting dedicated to civic and social issues in what would be the nation’s fourth largest city. We’re not comfortable with the idea of Brooklyn being split apart by income disparity and selective investment, and the general media paying attention to just a sliver of what’s happening here.

We need to hold everyone to a higher standard. And the Brooklyn Bureau, with its dedication to investigating local issues particularly in underserved communities across our borough, is a key part of our work to do that.

While City Limits’ reporters are canvassing Brooklyn for untold stories and new perspectives, researchers at the Center for the Study of Brooklyn at Brooklyn College are completing work on a series of Neighborhood Profiles for each of Brooklyn’s 18 Community Districts. These information-rich profiles look at key civic indicators over the past decade, so that we can begin to see trends and identify needs across neighborhoods, the borough, and the City.

The Neighborhood Profiles will premiere on the Brooklyn Bureau later this month. In the spring, we will build on this neighborhood-level work to publish the first ever Borough-wide Brooklyn Trends Report, examining the strength of our collective local economy, housing stock, health and healthcare, public safety, education system, environment, and the arts.

We invite you to join us at the Brooklyn Community Foundation as we create a chronicle of 21st century Brooklyn life.

In subsequent columns we’ll take a thorough look at each of Brooklyn’s 18 Community Districts through the lens of City Limits’ reporting, the Center for the Study of Brooklyn’s data analysis, and the Brooklyn Community Foundation’s knowledge of the nonprofit community and key public policy issues.

We hope you’ll accompany us on this journey to explore one of the liveliest, most interesting places on the planet—sometimes referred to as the people’s republic of Brooklyn—and we hope it inspires you to Do Good Right Here.