Linkin Park’s Mike Shinoda calls CHVRCHES “Disney commercial music,” CHVRCHES respond

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Back in April, Linkin Park’s Mike Shinoda caused a minor huff when he made comments to Noisey about the homogeneous nature of the modern music landscape. “There’s so much music out there,” he said. “There’s so much stuff that sounds like HAIM or CHVRCHES or Vampire Weekend that I’m full. The thing I’m hungry for is not that. I turn on the rock station in L.A. and it sounds like Disney commercial music.”

Not to be taken lightly, CHVRCHES have responded to Shinoda’s claims in kind. During an interview with joiz at France’s OpenAir St. Gallen festival, multi-instrumentalist Iain Cook said Shinoda’s remarks were “a pointless dig,” adding, “What does he have to gain from saying that?” For her part, singer Lauren Mayberry called “bullshit” on Shinoda’s claims, explaining that it’s no “coincidence that he’s got a record to sell and he mentions several bands everyone is writing about.”  Update: According to CHVRCHESFans, the translation is wrong and Cook actually said “pointless dig,” not “pointless dick.”

Not quite yet done drawing blood, Mayberry also explained that she doesn’t “like being called a corporate sellout by the man who wrote the theme music for the MTV VMAs.” At which point she pretended to drop the mic.

Still, don’t expect CHVRCHES to get drawn into some rap-rock/synthpop feud (unless Shinoda makes his own response). Rather, Mayberry said that Shinoda’s opinion is “not one I would worry about hugely,” adding, “It’s not my kind of music. They’ve been on the radio for how long, and I just don’t listen to that radio station. That’s a smarter move then saying something for a tagline.”

In a similar display of “wisdom beyond their experience,” multi-instrumentalist Martin Doherty said the trio just tries to ignore any outside comments, be it good or bad. “We’ve developed this near super-human ability to block out whatever people are saying about us,” he said. “From the very first day we were in the public domain, we’ve known it’s as important to not listen to the praise as much as it’s not important to listen to the negative comments. Ultimatley, both have the same affect. We’ve been remarkably focused from day one.”

Even though they released the always perfect Hybrid Theory, this isn’t the first instance Linkin Park have been a bunch of fuddy-duddies as of late. In March, the band reportedly got cops to confiscate the weed belonging to Sublime With Rome while that band was on stage. Linkin Park later denied the rumors, but it’s hard to definitively shake the tag of a “narc.”

Watch the full interview below. The discussion about Shinoda begins around the 9:00 mark:

Spotlight on Safety for Shows Outdoors

The scene at the Indiana State Fair, where a stage collapsed on Aug. 13, 2011. Picture: Matt Kryger/The Indianapolis Star, via Associated Press

The scene at the Indiana State Fair, where a stage collapsed on Aug. 13, 2011. Picture: Matt Kryger/The Indianapolis Star, via Associated Press

The New York Times
Published: September 9, 2012

Jim Digby, the tour manager for Linkin Park, knows better than most how dangerous a rock ‘n’ roll show can be. In 1983 he was a 19-year-old technical director at a new nightclub outside Philadelphia when a piece of equipment he was operating came off a faulty overhead track, plummeted toward the floor and killed a young woman standing just a few feet from him.

“My finger was on the button,” he recalled. “That memory has been buried inside me for years.”

That moment flashed through his mind, he said, when stage rigging collapsed at the Indiana State Fair last year and killed seven people waiting to hear the country duo Sugarland. The accident was one of four that summer in which stages collapsed in high winds. Then this June a drum technician for Radiohead died in Toronto when a stage roof fell before a show, this time in fair weather.

For Mr. Digby the Indiana disaster was a turning point. During the past year he has organized a campaign to improve safety at outdoor events, and, though his group’s efforts are in the early stages, he has garnered support from AEG Worldwide, one of the nation’s largest promoters, as well as from stage manufacturers and leaders of the IATSE, the stagehands’ union.

Mr. Digby’s organization, the Event Safety Alliance, is pushing the outdoor concert industry to adopt national standards not only for stage construction but also for emergency procedures during bad weather and other crises. Those standards would be based on a guidebook published by British workplace-safety authorities that has become widely used in Britain and elsewhere in Europe.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

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