The Antlers, ‘Doppelganger’ (Live) – favorite NPR sessions

July 14, 2014
The Brooklyn band frequently finds inspiration in dark places: On 2009’s Hospice, singer-guitarist Peter Silberman reflects on terminal illness and emotional abuse, while this year’s Familiars turns the Buddhist notion of bardo, a state of being between incarnations, into the impetus for a dialog about multiple selves.

Whether or not you notice his intentions, it’s hard not to be swept away by The Antlers’ dreamy, ambient pop melodies. Familiars is felt in the heart, not the head. Here, the band performs “Doppelganger” in a gorgeous studio session. Head over to watch three more videos documenting the band’s recent appearance.

Enjoy.

Ed Sheeran, ‘X’

Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Clear Channel

Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Clear Channel

CD Review

Ed Sheeran plays the Xfinity Center Sept. 9.

 

Taylor Swift bestie and duet partner, writer of songs for One Direction, management client of Sir Elton John, British singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran comes into his own on his sophomore album “x” — pronounced “multiply.”

If his slow-burning hit 2011 debut “+” — pronounced “plus” — helped break Sheeran thanks to “The A Team,” a hushed lament about a drug-addled prostitute, “x” will be remembered for the redhead letting loose his inner soulman and MC. It works thanks to his own keening croon and assistance from a wide spectrum of producers known for their work with rock and hip-hop artists, including Rick Rubin and Pharrell.

While many of the spare acoustic tracks creep up on you with their tunefulness a la “The A Team” — including burbling opener “One” and the haunting “Photograph” — others take charge right out of the gate.

“Sing” has a danceable snap similar to producer Pharrell’s own “Happy.” “Bloodstream” is one of several tracks to include an irresistible hum and simultaneous sense of ease and intensity. But “Don’t,” a scathing, cuss-laden takedown of a paramour who betrayed Sheeran while they were staying in the same hotel is his masterstroke, combining a singer-songwriter’s eye with a contemporary groove for lacerating-but-danceable results. (Out now)

 

 

Paul Weller’s retro-Modernists plaster go-faster stripes over Beatles B-side. Watch it now!

Paul Weller

Paul Weller

 

Have you forgotten – if only for a nanosecond – the brilliance of The Jam? Then return with us to 1977, when in the face of punk’s public renunciation of all the music that came before, Woking’s splenetic power trio celebrated the Mod and Motown sounds of some 15 years earlier. In this incandescent clip, Paul Weller, Bruce Foxton, and Rick Buckler tear into the 1958 Larry Williams song popularized by The Beatles on their Long Tall Sally EP (and, in the States, on their Matchbox single) in 1964.

The group’s fusion of vintage sensibility and thrashing punk energy transforms an arguable standard into a veritable explosion. For two minutes The Style Council, even English Rose or Dreams Of Children, seem a universe away.