Europe Will Have to Face Facts on Elections in Eastern Ukraine: Austrian Observer

Local residents participate in the elections of the Donetsk People's Republic's leadership on November 2, 2014.

Local residents participate in the elections of the Donetsk People’s Republic’s leadership on November 2, 2014.

© RIA Novosti. Alexei Kudenko

Topic: Situation in the South-East of Ukraine

 

MOSCOW, November 2 (RIA Novosti) – An Austrian observer said Europe will have to accept the facts in regard to elections held Sunday in the self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic in eastern Ukraine.

“It is the greatest mistake in history to ignore facts. After a time the European governments will have to face the facts, they will have to accept the facts,” Ewald Stadtler said in regard to Europe acknowledging the elections in Donetsk.

“After a cooling down period, they will have negotiations with the elected representatives of the Donetsk Republic because you can’t ignore a political party, well, maybe one month, but not for a year,” Stadtler added.

The European Union, as well as the United States and the United Nations, have condemned the elections, saying they would violate the conditions of the peace agreement reached on September 5 in Minsk, Belarus. Russia, however, said earlier it was going to recognize the election results since the move would help legitimize the leadership in the region.

Founder of the Indipendenza Veneta (Independent Veneto) movement Alessio Morosin also opined during his Saturday interview with RIA Novosti that not recognizing the elections in Donetsk and Luhansk would run counter to the same ceasefire agreement reached on September 5 between the independence supporters and the Kiev authorities.

Foreign Observers Surprised With Kiev’s Intention to Declare Them Pesona Non Grata

Members of an election commission in school No.1 of Donetsk.

Members of an election commission in school No.1 of Donetsk.

Topic: Situation in the South-East of Ukraine

DONETSK, November 2 (RIA Novosti) The foreign observers, monitoring the elections in the self-proclaimed Luhansk and Donetsk people’s republics in eastern Ukraine expressed concern over Kiev’s intention to declare them persona non grata.

Earlier on Sunday, the Security Service of Ukraine (SBU) announced Kiev’s plans to declare international monitors at the elections in Donbas persona non grata on the territory of Ukraine.

“I feel sorry that I was blacklisted [by Kiev authorities], as I was previously observing the elections in Ukraine several times. I only monitor the election process. If I saw some violations, I would report. My duty is to protect the rights of the people,” Italian lawmaker Lucio Malan said Sunday.

The Member of European Parliament, Jean-Luc Shefhauzen, said that declaring the observers persona non grata by Kiev is contrary to the idea of peace and does not meet the concept of federalism, because federalism is an ability of citizens to determine their own future.

On Sunday, the self-proclaimed Donetsk and Luhansk people’s republics were electing their regional leaders and legislative bodies.

One hundred observers from a number of European countries and the United States have arrived in the region to monitor the elections.

The authorities in the European Union and the United States, however, said earlier the elections would come against the Minsk agreement on the regulation of the crisis in Donbas, and that the international community would not recognize them.

Meanwhile, Russia has expressed its intention to recognize the elections in the self-proclaimed people’s republics, saying not doing so would run counter to the Minsk protocol and disrupt the progress toward finding a sustainable political solution to the conflict.

Russian Observers Suspect ‘Special’ Voting Technologies in Scotland

Russian observers have suspicions over the "special" voting technologies used during the Scottish independence referendum.

Russian observers have suspicions over the “special” voting technologies used during the Scottish independence referendum.

Topic: Scotland on the Eve of Independence Referendum

EDINBURGH, September 18 (RIA Novosti) – Russian observers have suspicions over the “special” voting technologies used during the Scottish independence referendum and expect the announcement of results that will either confirm or disprove their suspicions.

“The absence of lines at voting offices could indicate the use of special voting technologies. About 20 percent vote in advance, via post. From our experience, we know that in 2012 Barack Obama beat Mitt Romney during presidential elections in early [stages of the] voting. That is, he won prior to the day of the election. Whether this technology was used during the referendum, we will know when the votes have been counted,” Igor Borisov, the chairman of the Council of the Russian Public Institute of Election Law and the head of the Russian observation mission, told RIA Novosti.

“If the organizers of the referendum announce the results of the postal votes separately from the results received on the day of the election, then it will be possible to assess how great the influence of technologies on the vote was,” he added.

Borisov noted that voter turnout is very high. According to members of the polling offices, by 10-11 a.m. BST (09:00-10:00 GMT) as many people came to vote as there were during the European Parliament elections in spring.

“At the same time, I cannot say that people wait to vote. I haven’t noticed anything like that. Although, there are lines of two-three people to take to the ballot,” Borisov said.

The Russian observation mission arrived in Edinburgh yesterday evening, comprising four specialists to monitor the Scottish independence referendum. Russian representatives will also monitor the vote count.