London Grammar – Sights (Tourist Version)

londongrammar

London Grammar

 

London Grammar is a British trip-hop trio formed by Hannah Reid, Dan Rothman and Dominic ‘Dot’ Major.  Their début EP, Metal & Dust, was released in February 2013 by Metal & Dust Recordings Ltd. Their debut album, If You Wait, was released on 9 September 2013 and set platinum certification by the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) association.

‘Sights’ is their new single taken from their debut album ‘If You Wait’.  Out June 1st

Their debut album ‘If You Wait’ is out now.

 

 

 

London Grammar
London Grammar September 2013.jpg

London Grammar on 27 September 2013, at Rickshaw Stop, San Francisco, California, USA.
Background information
Origin Nottingham, England, United Kingdom
Genres Electronica, trip-hop, indie pop
Years active 2012–present
Labels Metal & Dust Recordings, Ministry of Sound, Warner/Chappell, Columbia Records
Website LondonGrammar.com
Members
  • Dominic ‘Dot’ Major
  • Hannah Reid
  • Dan Rothman

Warpaint slams Beyoncé for hyper-sexualizing her music and image

Warpaint

Warpaint

 

While many music critics found Beyoncé’s surprise self-titled album to be an empowering, feminist-driven piece of work, psych-rock outfit Warpaint see things quite differently. In a new interview with Q Magazine, vocalist and guitarist Theresa Wayman criticized female pop stars like Queen Bey and Rihanna for unnecessarily over-sexualizing their music and public image.

“She [Rihanna] has an insane voice, she could’ve done something so much more stuble [sic] and artful,” she told Q.

Wayman then turned her eye toward the “Drunk In Love” megastar, commenting: “It just gets worse. Every song on Beyonce’s last album has her basically looking like a slut and she does not need to do that. She’s gorgeous and so fucking talented. And they all take it as women’s liberation!”

Perhaps mainstream music’s leading ladies should take a page out of Warpaint’s own “staunchly feminist, unyielding, and irreverent” self-titled sophomore LP.

Below, watch Warpaint’s video for “Disco/Very” and “Keep It Healthy”:

Update: Theresa Wayman has offered an apology and says her comments were taken out of context.

 

NPR: Why People Fight About Pop Music ?

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Kanye West performing in New York City, 2012 – 13thWitness/Getty Images for Samsung

 

In 2007, the Canadian music critic Carl Wilson published a book-length experiment in extreme aesthetic sport: a sincere and shockingly comprehensive study of music he had already decided he hated. That book, Let’s Talk About Love, named for the Celine Dion album it studied, has become a cornerstone text in the school of criticism known as “poptimism,” because it treats seemingly disposable pop music as worthy of serious thought.

Last month, was reissued with a set of new essays by writers like Nick Hornby, Krist Novaselic, James Franco and NPR Music’s own Ann Powers. The timing couldn’t have been better. In 2014, nothing starts a fight more quickly than a huge pop song. Ann and Carl exchanged notes on why.

PART ONE: Is There A Crisis In Music Criticism?

PART TWO: Why Do People Have Beef With Poptimism? Because It’s Winning

PART THREE: Five Rules For New Pop Criticism

PART FOUR: Don’t Front

PART FIVE: Music We All Love Has Done Way More Harm Than Miley Ever Will

Worst Bands Ever: Singers, Rappers, Pop stars and Bands that suck

The worst bands in music history, ranked by music fans (and haters.) This list contains the most awful bands to listen to from throughout the history of recorded music, suggested and voted on based on a variety of metrics, including popular bands least deserving of their fame and fortune, artists who shamelessly ripped off other, superior acts and just bands that don’t know how to play their instruments or write songs. Obviously, the majority of choices will be rock bands, but any “musical group” or bands are technically eligible. Think the worst band of all time is a jazz band? Hate polka bands as much (or more) than Nickelback? You may hate Sting, but unless you also hate The Police, save it for another list!

Justin Bieber

Pop music, Teen pop, Contemporary R&B

Justin Drew Bieber ( /ˈbiːbər/ bee-bər, born March 1, 1994) is a Canadian pop/R&B singer, songwriter and actor. Bieber was discovered in 2008 by Scooter Braun, who came across Bieber’s videos on YouTube and later became his manager. Braun arranged for him to meet with Usher in Atlanta, Georgia, and Bieber was soon signed to Raymond Braun Media Group…  [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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Inner City Posse

Hip hop music, Horrorcore, Gangsta rap

Insane Clown Posse is an American hip hop duo from Detroit, Michigan. The group is composed of Joseph Bruce and Joseph Utsler, who perform under the respective personas of the “wicked clowns” Violent J and Shaggy 2 Dope. Insane Clown Posse performs a style of hardcore hip hop known as horrorcore and is known for its elaborate live performances. The duo has earned  two platinum and five gold albums. According to Nielsen SoundScan, the entire catalog of the group has sold 6.5 million units in the United States and Canada as of April 2007. [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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Jonas Brothers

Bubblegum pop, Pop music, Rock music

The Jonas Brothers are an American boy band. Formed in 2005, they have gained popularity from the Disney Channel children’s television network and consists of three brothers from the shore region of New Jersey; Paul Kevin Jonas II, Joseph Adam Jonas and Nicholas Jerry Jonas. In the summer of 2008 they starred in the Disney Channel Original Movies Camp Rock and its sequel, Camp Rock 2: The Final Jam. The band has released four albums: It’s About Time, Jonas Brothers, A Little Bit Longer, and Lines, Vines and Trying Times. In 2008, the group was nominated for the Best New Artist award at the 51st Grammy Awards and won the award for Breakthrough Artist at the American Music Awards. As of May 2009, before the release of Lines, Vines and…  [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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Nickelback

Rock music, Grunge, Heavy metal

Nickelback is a Canadian rock band from Hanna, Alberta. Since 1995 the band has included guitarist and lead vocalist Chad Kroeger, guitarist and back-up vocalist Ryan Peake and bassist Mike Kroeger. The band’s current drummer and percussionist is Daniel Adair who has been with the band since 2005. Nickelback’s music is classed as hard rock, alternative metal, and alternative rock. Nickelback is one of the most commercially successful Canadian groups, having sold more than 50 million albums worldwide, ranking as the 11th best selling music act of the 2000s, and is the 2nd best selling foreign act in the U.S. behind The Beatles for the 2000’s. The band is based in Vancouver, Canada. The band’s original domestic signing was with EMI…. [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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Nicki Minaj

Hip hop music, Synthpop, Hardcore hip hop

Onika Tanya Maraj (born December 8, 1982), known by her stage name Nicki Minaj ( /mɪˈnɑːʒ/), is a Trinidadian-born American musician. She was born in Saint James, Trinidad and Tobago, and moved to the New York borough of Queens when she was five. After releasing three mixtapes between 2007 and 2009 and being signed to Young Money Entertainment in August 2009, Minaj released her debut album, Pink Friday, in November 2010. It quickly became a commercial success, peaking at number one on the U.S. Billboard 200 and being certified Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) a month after its release. She became the first artist to have seven singles on the Billboard Hot 100 at the same time. Her second single, “Your…  [ Read More at Wikipedia]

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Kevin Federline

Hip hop music

Kevin Earl Federline (born March 21, 1978) is an American dancer, rapper, fashion model, and actor. Previously engaged to actress Shar Jackson, Federline is well known for his two-year marriage to pop singer Britney Spears. The couple’s divorce was highly publicized and was followed by an ongoing legal battle for the custody of their two sons, Sean Preston Federline and Jayden James Federline. Federline was born to parents Mike, a car mechanic, and Julie, a former bank teller from Oregon; the name Federline is of German origin. Federline has one brother, Chris. His parents divorced when he was eight years old. When Federline was eleven, he and Chris moved back to his father’s Fresno house. Federline dropped out of high school in the…. [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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LMFAO

Hip hop music, Synthpop, Electro

LMFAO is an American electro pop duo consisting of rappers, producers, dancers, and DJs Redfoo (Stefan Kendal Gordy, born September 3, 1975) and his nephew SkyBlu (Skyler Austen Gordy, born August 23, 1986). The group formed in 2006 in Los Angeles, California. RedFoo is also the son of music mogul Berry Gordy, and SkyBlu is his grandson. Their music incorporates a theme of partying and drinking, and the group commonly refers to their music style as “party rock”. The group’s name is an Internet slang abbreviation for “Laughing My Fucking Ass Off”. RedFoo (Stefan Kendal Gordy) and SkyBlu (Skyler Austen Gordy) both grew up in the affluent Los Angeles neighborhood Pacific Palisades, where they formed the group LMFAO in 2006. The duo has…. [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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Rebecca Black

Bubblegum pop, Synthpop, Pop music

Rebecca Renee Black (born June 21, 1997) is an American pop singer and dancer who gained extensive media attention with the 2011 single “Friday”. Her mother paid $4,000 to have the single and an accompanying music video put out as a vanity release through the record label ARK Music Factory. The song was co-written and produced by Clarence Jey and Patrice

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Soulja Boy

Hip hop music, Dirty rap, Pop music

DeAndre Cortez Way (born July 28, 1990), better known by his stage name Soulja Boy Tell ‘Em, or simply Soulja Boy, is an American rapper, record producer, actor, and entrepreneur. In September 2007, his single “Crank That (Soulja Boy)” reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100. The single was initially self-published on the internet, and it later became a number-one hit in the United States for seven non-consecutive weeks starting in September 2007. On August 17 Way was listed at #18 on the Forbes list of Hip-Hop Cash Kings of 2010 earning $7 million for that year. Way has currently released three studio albums and one independent album: his debut studio album Souljaboytellem.com (2007) was certified platinum by the RIAA. Howeverr his…. [ Read More at Wikipedia

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Limp Bizkit

Nu metal, Rap rock, Rapcore

Limp Bizkit is an American rock band. The band consists of Fred Durst, Wes Borland, Sam Rivers, John Otto and DJ Lethal. They have sold over 33 million records worldwide. Formed in 1994, Limp Bizkit started playing in the Jacksonville, Florida underground music scene in the late 1990s, signed with Flip Records and released their début album Three Dollar Bill, Yall$ in 1997. The band achieved mainstream success with their second and third studio albums, Significant Other (1999) and Chocolate Starfish and the Hot Dog Flavored Water (2000), although the success was marred by controversy. Borland left the group in 2001, and Durst, Rivers, Otto and Lethal continued to record and tour with guitarist Mike Smith. Following the release of their…. [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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Lil Wayne

Hip hop music, Ragga, Hardcore hip hop

Dwayne Michael Carter, Jr. (born September 27, 1982), better known by his stage name Lil Wayne, is an American rapper. At the age of nine, Lil Wayne joined Cash Money Records as the youngest member of the label, and half of the duo, The B.G.’z, with B.G.. In 1997, Lil Wayne joined the group Hot Boys, which also included rappers Juvenile, B.G., and Young Turk. Hot Boys debuted with Get It How U Live! that year. Lil Wayne gained most of his success with the group’s major selling album Guerrilla Warfare, released in 1999. Also in 1999, Lil Wayne released his Platinum debut album Tha Block Is Hot, selling over one million copies in the U.S. Although his next two albums Lights Out (2000) and 500 Degreez (2002) were not as successful (only…. [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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The Black Eyed Peas

Hip hop music, Alternative hip hop, Synthpop

The Black Eyed Peas are an American hip pop group (originally an alternative hip hop group), formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1995. The group consists of rappers will.i.am, apl.de.ap, and Taboo, and singer Fergie. Since the release of their third album Elephunk in 2003, the group has sold an estimated 65 million records worldwide. Their first worldwide song was “Where Is the Love?” in 2003, which topped 13 charts worldwide. Another single was the European hit “Shut Up”. Their next album Monkey Business, was a worldwide success, certified 4× Platinum in the U.S., and spawning two singles, “My Humps” and “Don’t Phunk with My Heart”. In 2009, the group became one of only 11 artists to have simultaneously held the No. 1 and No. 2 spots…. [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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Kesha

Hip hop music, Synthpop, Pop music

Kesha Rose Sebert (born March 1, 1987), known professionally as Kesha (pronunciation: /ˈkɛʃə/ kesh-ə, stylized Ke$ha), is an American singer-songwriter and rapper. In 2005, at 18, Kesha was signed to Dr. Luke’s record label, Kemosabe Entertainment, and publishing company. Although an active musician since then, singing background vocals and writing songs

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Paris Hilton

Bubblegum pop. pop music

Paris Whitney Hilton (born February 17, 1981) is an American businesswoman, potential future heiress, and socialite. She is a great-granddaughter of Conrad Hilton (founder of Hilton Hotels). Hilton is known for her controversial participation in a sex tape in 2003, and appearance on the television series The Simple Life alongside fellow socialite and childhood best friend Nicole Richie. She is also known for her 2004 tongue-in-cheek autobiography, several minor film roles (most notably her role in the horror film House of Wax in 2005), her 2006 music album Paris, and her work in modeling. In recent years Hilton is perhaps most known for starring in a number of her own produced reality shows such as Paris Hilton’s My New BFF which was… [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

Premiere Of Regent Releasing's "Hottie And The Nottie" - Arrivals

One Direction

Pop music, Teen pop, Electronic music

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Hannah Montana (Miley Cyrus)

Pop music

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Pitbull

Hip hop music, Electro hop, Latin American music

Armando Christian Pérez (born January 15, 1981), better known by his stage name Pitbull, is an American born rapper, singer-songwriter and record producer. His first recorded performance was from the Lil Jon album Kings of Crunk in 2002, after which he released his debut album in 2004 titled M.I.A.M.I. (short for Money Is a Major Issue) under TVT Records. Since then, he has released two other albums under the label: El Mariel in 2006 and The Boatlift in 2007. He then released Rebelution in 2009, which included singles “I Know You Want Me (Calle Ocho)” and “Krazy”. The latter peaked at No.30 on the Hot 100 and No.11 on the Hot Rap Tracks charts while “I Know You Want Me” peaked at No.2 on the Hot 100 and peaked within the top ten spots…. [ Read More at Wikipedia

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Brokencyde

Crunkcore

Brokencyde is an American crunkcore musical group from Albuquerque, New Mexico, founded in 2006. The group’s lineup consists of David Gallegos (vocals), Michael Shea (vocals), Julian McLellan (programming) and Anthony Trujillo (backing vocals), and musically are one of the founding groups in the crunkcore genre, which (in general description) is crunk hip-hop with screamed vocals. Brokencyde was founded by singers Se7en and Mikl. The name of the band supposedly originated from the idea that their music was “broke inside” due to personal problems. After the band began promoting themselves online, members Phat J and Antz joined Brokencyde. They released their debut mixtape, The Broken!, in July 2007, followed by another mixtape, Tha $c3ne …. [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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Miley Cyrus

Adult contemporary music, Bubblegum pop, Synthpop

Miley Ray Cyrus (born Destiny Hope Cyrus; November 23, 1992) is an American actress and pop singer-songwriter. She achieved wide fame for her role as Miley Stewart/Hannah Montana on the Disney Channel sitcom Hannah Montana. Cyrus recorded music for the soundtracks, Hannah Montana (2006) and Hannah Montana 2/Meet Miley Cyrus (2007), released by Walt Disney Records. With the success of the Hannah Montana franchise she established herself as a teen idol. In 2007, Cyrus signed to Hollywood Records to pursue a solo career. She embarked upon the Best of Both Worlds Tour the same year, in which she performed as both herself and in character as Hannah Montana. The tour was eventually turned into a high-grossing concert film titled Hannah…. [ Read More at Wikipedia]

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 Chris Brown

Urban contemporary, Hip hop music, Pop music

Christopher Maurice “Chris” Brown (born May 5, 1989) is an American singer-songwriter, dancer and actor. He made his recording debut in late 2005 with the self-titled album Chris Brown at the age of 16. The album featured the hit single “Run It!”, which topped the Billboard Hot 100, making Brown the first male artist as a lead to have his debut single top the chart since Puff Daddy in 1997. The album has sold over two million copies in the United States and was certified double Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). Brown’s second studio album, Exclusive was released in 2007. It spawned two successful singles; his second U.S. number one hit, “Kiss Kiss” featuring T-Pain and “With You”, which peaked at number…. [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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Hanson

Indie pop, Pop music, Teen pop

Hanson are an American pop rock band formed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, by brothers Isaac (guitar, piano, vocals), Taylor (keyboards, piano, guitar, drums, vocals), and Zac Hanson (drums, piano, guitar, vocals). They are best known for the 1997 hit song “MMMBop” from their major label debut album Middle of Nowhere, which earned three Grammy nominations. Despite the enormous commercial success of Middle of Nowhere, the band suffered from the merger that eliminated their label, Mercury Records. The group was moved to Island Def Jam Music Group, which they eventually left after conflict with the label about creative input. Hanson have sold over 16 million records worldwide and have had eight top 40 singles in the UK and six top 40 singles in the…. [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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Rihanna

Pop music, Hip hop music, Synthpop

Robyn Rihanna Fenty ( /riˈɑːnə/ ree-ah-nə or /riˈænə/ ree-an-ə; born February 20, 1988), better known as simply Rihanna, is a Barbadian recording artist and singer. Born in Saint Michael, Barbados, Rihanna moved to the United States at the age of 16 to pursue a recording career under the guidance of record producer Evan Rogers. She subsequently signed a contract with Def Jam Recordings. In 2005, Rihanna released her debut studio album, Music of the Sun, which peaked in the top ten of the Billboard 200 chart and features the Billboard Hot 100 hit single “Pon de Replay.” Less than a year later, she released her second studio album, A Girl Like Me (2006), which peaked within the top five of the Billboard albums chart, and produced her…. [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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Good Charlotte

Pop punk, Rock music, Dance-punk

Good Charlotte is an American rock band from Waldorf, Maryland that formed in 1996. Since 1998, the band’s constant members have been lead vocalist Joel Madden, lead guitarist and back-up vocalist Benji Madden, bass guitarist Paul Thomas and rhythm guitarist and keyboardist Billy Martin. Their latest drummer and percussionist is Dean Butterworth, who has been a member of the band since 2005. The band has released five studio albums: Good Charlotte (2000), The Young and the Hopeless (2002), The Chronicles of Life and Death (2004), Good Morning Revival (2007) and Cardiology (2010) as well as two compilations Greatest Remixes (2008) and Greatest Hits (2010). The band made a name for itself in nearby Washington, D.C., playing the WHFS…. [ Read More at Wikipedia

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Ashlee Simpson-Wentz

Pop punk, Pop music, Rock music

Ashlee Simpson (born October 3, 1984) is an American singer-songwriter and actress. She rose to prominence in 2004 with the success of her number-one debut album Autobiography and the reality series, The Ashlee Simpson Show. In October 2005, following a North American concert tour and a film appearance, Simpson released her second number-one album, I Am Me. Simpson’s third album, Bittersweet World, was released in April 2008. Simpson was born in Waco, Texas and raised in the Richardson area of Texas. She is the daughter of Tina Ann (née Drew), a homemaker, and Joe Truett Simpson, a former psychologist and Baptist youth minister who works as her manager. Simpsons’ background is mainly of English American, Irish, Scottish, and Native…. [ Read More at Wikipedia

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Backstreet Boys

Adult contemporary music, Bubblegum pop, Pop music

The Backstreet Boys (sometimes referred to as BSB) are an American vocal group, formed in Orlando, Florida in 1993. The band originally consisted of A. J. McLean, Howie Dorough, Brian Littrell, Nick Carter and Kevin Richardson. They rose to fame with their debut international album, Backstreet Boys (1996). In the following year, they released their second international album, Backstreet’s Back (1997) and their debut album in the United States which continued the group’s success worldwide. They rose to superstardom with their album Millennium (1999) and its follow-up album, Black & Blue (2000). After a three-year hiatus, the band regrouped and have released their comeback album: Never Gone (2005), as well as two further albums…. [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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Lady Gaga

Pop music, Rock music, Electronic music

Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta (/ˈstɛfəniː dʒʌrməˈnɑːtə/; born March 28, 1986), better known by her stage name Lady Gaga, is an American singer and songwriter. Born and raised in New York City, she primarily studied at the Convent of the Sacred Heart and briefly attended New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts before withdrawing to focus on her musical career. She began performing in the rock music scene of Manhattan’s Lower East Side, and by the end of 2007, was signed with Streamline Records. Employed as a songwriter for the record company, her vocal abilities captured the attention of recording artist Akon, who signed her to his label Kon Live Distribution. Lady Gaga came to prominence as a recording artist following the…. [ Read More at Wikipedia

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Lil’ Kim

Hip hop music, Dirty rap, Hardcore hip hop

Kimberly Denise Jones (born July 11, 1974), better known by her stage name Lil’ Kim, is an American rapper and actress who was a member of the group Junior M.A.F.I.A.. Jones was born and raised in Brooklyn, living much of her adolescent life on the streets after being expelled from home. As a teenager, Kim would rap for fun, being heavily influenced by other female MC’S like MC Lyte and Lady of Rage. When word got to The Notorious B.I.G. that she could rhyme, he made Jones perform a freestyle for him on the spot. Impressed with her, he took her in and she began her music career in 1995 with the group Junior M.A.F.I.A., whose debut album Conspiracy generated three hit singles. In late 1996, her solo debut album Hard Core was released…. [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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Yoko Ono

Pop music, Rock music, Electronic dance music

Yoko Ono (オノ・ヨーコ, also 小野 洋子, Ono Yōko, born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist, musician, author and peace activist, known for her work in avant-garde art, music and filmmaking as well as her marriage to John Lennon. Ono brought feminism to the forefront in her music which prefigured New Wave music (whether she was a direct influence is still debated) and is known for her philanthropic contributions to the arts, peace and AIDS outreach programs. Yoko Ono was born in 1933 to mother Isoko Ono, the great-granddaughter of Zenjiro Yasuda of the Yasuda banking family, and to father Yeisuke Ono, a banker and one-time classical pianist who was a descendant of an Emperor of Japan. The name “Yoko” means “ocean child”. Two weeks…. [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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David Archuleta

Blue-eyed soul, Pop music, Teen pop

David James Archuleta (born December 28, 1990) is an American pop singer-songwriter. At ten years old he won the children’s division of the Utah Talent Competition leading to other television singing appearances. When he was twelve years old, Archuleta became the Junior Vocal Champion on Star Search 2. In 2007, at sixteen years old, he became one of the youngest contestants on the seventh season of American Idol. In May 2008 he finished as the runner-up, receiving 44 percent of over 97 million votes. In August 2008 Archuleta released “Crush,” the first single from his self-titled debut album. The album, released three months later, debuted at number two on the Billboard 200 chart; it has sold over 750,000 copies in the U.S. and over…. [ Read More at Wikipedia ]

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Liz Phair On Self-Titled Album – Interview

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The 46-year-old pop singer-songwriter-guitarist talks about the 10th anniversary of her self-titled album ‘Liz Phair’, the pros and cons of major label money, and finding a kindred spirit in Lil Wayne.

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So, the self-titled album.
Eponymous. I love that word.

The eponymous album. What’s the biggest misconception about it?
Hmm…the biggest misconception is probably that it was recorded all at once. It was actually recorded in many different studio situations over the course of probably a year and a half.

How much of that was done before The Matrix was brought in as songwriters?
All of it! The Matrix was the last thing that happened. After touring with whitechocolatespaceegg I did some with my band from that record and then I did a few with Pete Yorn’s guy Walt Vincent when I first moved to Los Angeles. Then, when Andy Slater became president of Capitol, he hooked me up with Michael Penn. In the end, I think it was supposed to be all the Michael Penn sessions, but I didn’t really feel like that quite represented me, you know? I remember my A&R guy was Ron Laffitte and he was like, “Well, what would you do differently?” And I said I wanted to use these songs from these other sessions as well, like I just didn’t feel like they represented what I had musically inside me to give. He went back to Capitol and they were like, “Well, you can do that if you work with these sort of hitmakers and give us some hits to work with. Then we’ll sort of let this be some whole other animal.” And I had some trepidation going into that, but at the same time I embraced it pretty quickly. I said “sure!” I hadn’t really done any cowrites, and at that point, it wasn’t such a horrifying idea to work with someone else. When I went to meet them, I discovered that I actually knew them, I just didn’t know them as the Matrix. I knew them through friends and people. I remember Lauren [Christy] opened the door and said, “Yeah, I was waiting to see what your reaction would be when I opened the door.” And it was such a wonderful feeling because I just had loved them when I’d met them. It’s so funny, [adopts Elaine Benes-style mocking voice] “The Maaaaaaaatriiiix.” It has such a…I don’t know. A sort of branded name. “The Maaaaaaaaaaatriiiiiiix.” And the people involved I already knew and liked very much.

How familiar were you with their other work at the time?
I like Avril Lavigne! I loved “Complicated.” I thought that was a great pop song. I thought she was a cute little punky, quirky chick. When the label says, “We need some hits,” you know what it’s going to be like. Duh! It’s going to be like that. Some people expected me to have some sort of aversion to that, which I’ve never had. I’ve always loved hit songs my whole life, that has nothing to do with it, I just write differently than that. When I’m left in a room alone, I sound much more small and personal, and I think my older fans just expected me to have a political feeling about that, that I wouldn’t do something like that. Which is…just not true. I’m much more inclusive, musically, than that. It just was a different thing. Which is how I looked at it. But then of course, the shitstorm began.

Right, the shitstorm. Why do you think people reacted so strongly in this particular case?
Because it meant something more to them and I understand that now. A lot of people making that kind of indie music were doing it because they were against mainstream music. Talking to Steve Albini in the Guyville Redux documentary, he’s a perfect spokesman for them, he’s eloquent. He explains that it has its roots in a business decision, in an alternative economic model that’s based on good faith and sort of a…pure love of music. That makes sense to me now, but the misconception was—and anyone that knew me back when Guyville was first breaking would know this about me, when I was in the suburbs—the reason it sounds like that is because when you stick me in a room just by myself, that’s what’s gonna come out. I write these weird, introverted, conversational, confessional, angry songs. It wasn’t a political decision for me.

I always thought it was funny that the eponymous album is considered this fluffy pop thing but opens with the heaviest guitar you’ve ever put on a record.
But it’s produced! There’s no question you can smell money on it. As a person I’ve always lived this way and will continue until the day I die: there are times when you go to a local bar and hang out with your regular friends, and there are times you get dressed up and you go to a black tie dinner or some fundraising function. It’s still you, you’re just in a different context. I’ve always lived that way, and I think a lot of people do. I love hip-hop, I love jazz. If someone came to me with a budget and said “Let’s do a jazz record!” I’d be like, “Whoa, okay!” I guess that’s not a good example because jazz is cool. But my friend wants me to do this thing that he wants to become a dance hit—and that makes sense to me! This is me, I’m musical to my core. Why not explore? So I felt once we added the old tracks onto the Liz Phair [note: every time Phair says the title of this album aloud she says “Liz Phair Liz Phair,” it’s beyond endearing but too much to ask on the page—ed] disc I thought it was this nice bouquet. There’s some serious roses, but you have some wildflowers in there too.

What happened in the five years following whitechocolatespaceegg and what was going on with the label? That album wasn’t directed by Capitol in any way—
Oh no, it was, it was. Matador had signed with Capitol at that point. I was really pissed off about that, but they sort of paid me out so I was like, fine. It was really awkward promoting that record because they had two labels involved. They’d have these meetings with representatives from the indie label and then there’d representatives from the major label. They were trying to work together but ultimately looking back on it, all those major labels buying up all the indies in the Nirvana period…that was all economic, they just wanted to grab that wave for themselves. And then they had to figure out how to work with them, and that of course didn’t make any sense. They approached working totally differently, so after whitechocolatespaceegg, anything I did would either come from the indie or the major, and sometimes they fought. It was ridiculous, like having two masters.

Obviously that didn’t work out, Matador left Capitol but I got stuck staying on it. I think that was sort of part of the deal when they let Matador go. “Okay, but we’re keeping Liz,” because at that time I was sort of a big name. That felt really daunting; suddenly I was on this label I never intended to be on, never would’ve signed to. But I also had a young child, so that’s sort of the dark matter that’s not obvious. I’d just had my son and touring with a really small child…sometimes it was fun but very emotional, to get tired and cry a lot. I needed that time off in between to even get back to a place where I could function like a touring entity.

Do you remember any specific things Capitol and Matador people argued about?
Not so much, it was just…Matador was great about it and was always so fun. I was watching School of Rock the other day and I love when Jack Black’s like, “Stick it to the man!”—that’s what Matador was all about. Like, the larger the circulation of the publication we were being interviewed by, the more they expected us to kind of lie and bullshit, make up ridiculous answers and see if they would get printed. That kind of spirit was so much fun. Capitol was about servicing as large a venue as you possibly could, with like, please and thank yous. It just was a mess. You know? It was a mess.

It’s odd because Capitol put out OK Computer the year before spaceegg so you’d think they were looking for more weirdness.
Well Gary Gersh was a huge advocate of Radiohead and he probably personally…well, you never know if he became a spokesperson for someone else’s idea—but there was definitely a sense that Radiohead was a smart move, and that they felt smart for having them. But I think Radiohead had friction with them on and off their whole time there.

Do you think the bad reaction to Liz Phair was a gender thing too? Like you were still a really serious guitar player doing these complicated chord sequences and…
Are you saying I was rocking too hard and people couldn’t accept a woman doing it?

Oh no, I’m saying it wasn’t even accepted as a rock album.
The eponymous one was much more pop. It just was, in my catalog. And it was overtly about pop, it was a moment when pop was big. The thing that made the eponymous record what it was, were the Matrix songs. You cannot divorce anything that happened around that record. It also afforded me the ability to stretch my wings in terms of performance. I got places and did things I never would’ve gotten without the Matrix songs. I had my best touring experiences off the Liz Phair record. By far. I played “God Bless America” for the White Sox when they won the World Series that year, on an opening game. Or, I played this amazing Nike concert where this kid who had terminal cancer and couldn’t see anymore got up and played drums on “Why Can’t I?” in front of 5,000 people. There was just a lot of cool experiences…holding the main stage at Bumbershoot. Being big enough to turn a large audience in your favor that maybe weren’t as familiar. It was an amazing time for us. Crazy stuff. Insane amounts of radio. That whole world. I would’ve missed that! For the listener, all they’re hearing is what’s in their house, on their stereo. But for an artist, that was a ticket to ride to faraway places that I really enjoyed. And I grew from, my god! In a weird way, that was the making of me as a performer. Those Matrix songs—another thing important about Liz Phair—is vocally I stretched in ways I never had before. I don’t think anyone had ever heard me sing like that before, or even thought I could. The Guyville stuff is pretty low and it’s a totally different perception of me.

A lot of artists are not that great performers the way you’d think on American Idol or something, and a lot of people are just performers, who can do a great vocal delivery but don’t have much in the songwriting. I was an artist and just had never learned how to do the other thing. I learned to do both and it was a pure joy. Other than the pissed-off old fans in the audience who’d cross their arms and glare daggers at me from the stage, there was so much joy in being able to perform the Matrix songs purely for the vocal. It was like flying.

Were there really people in the audience you could see crossing their arms?
Oh fuck yeah. It was like…it was like an un-wished-for wedding, with one side of the aisle of old fans and one side of new fans and neither would speak to each other. It was challenging like, every night, ‘What can we play? Who’s out there? What would we be able to get away with? Should we play more of the old stuff or new stuff?’ And these poor new fans had no idea where I come from, they just heard one song on the radio. And some of them were like, 12! And that was really tough too, because my lyrics are clearly adult-oriented. I used to get upset like, why are you bringing your nine-year-old to my show? Did you do any research?

Speaking of which, I wanted to ask about your own family or your own kid’s reactions to your lyrics…
There’s only one part of my extended family, my godbrother, him and his family are hilarious and they love my music, which is awesome. But they like to torment me, they’ll just put it on during dinner and make me listen to it. Or they’ll like, only speak to me in my lyrics back, they did that one time. I’ll be like, “That’s funny guys…OK, that’s funny. OK, it’s not funny anymore…’

But most of my family life doesn’t really have anything to do with the music. Like my son, he knows what I do and he knows a little bit about my history but he doesn’t even come into it, it’s weird. I compartmentalize life in a lot of ways. Many sections. They don’t often intermingle. Like, when I go home I’m Elizabeth.

Which is funny because your audience is so compartmentalized, too.
You get what you give, right?

Did the Matrix or any label people object to any of your lyrics?
I think the only time we ever got into word fights was I didn’t want to say the word “underwear” in “Favorite.” It took a week of Lauren [Christy] like, wearing me down. I was like, ‘I can’t say it, I can’t say it.’ So it wasn’t like I was coming up with these tawdry lyrics they wouldn’t allow. That was the biggest word fight, and she won.

What word did you want to use?
I didn’t know! I couldn’t win the fight because I couldn’t come up with an alternative. Can’t say “panties!” I just couldn’t get around it. Every time I think about it I’m just like, I can’t say that word. It’s too corny. I still have trouble with that song, and it’s too bad because I like to sing it…melodically. [laughs] But it’s not my writing style.

And the label didn’t give you shit at all about putting—
Not at all. And we put “Hot White Cum” on that record! There was a definite moment where I was sitting in Ron Laffitte’s office after hours and I’m looking at him and I’m like, “Can we put whatever we want on the rest of the record?” And he’s like, “Now that we’ve got these songs? Yeah!” And I said, “Can we put ‘Hot White Cum’ on the record? And he got this twinkle in his eye and he was like, “Fuck yeah.” [laughs] I guess they’re thinking like, controversy, can’t hurt.

So, “Hot White Cum.” Did you just want to write a song about cum— [laughs hysterically]

—or did you want to write about something no one had done before…
No, there was none of that. That’s a me song, that’s all me. I was having really good sex and I wrote that song completely spontaneously. I knew it’s funny. There’s a lot of songs I’ve written—and I used to do it more—that were funnier and never saw the light of day, where people would be like, “Cute, Liz.” All the way back to Girlysound.

Like “White Babies.”
When I write a song I’m not thinking about marketing at all. There’s no marketing brain in me whatsoever. It just makes sense to me. It isn’t until later when it’s gonna go on a record that I start to get hives and freak out like, “Fuck!”

Does that happen?
That always happens. It’s what makes me different as an artist but it’s also what causes me great difficulty in life. I’m slow on the uptake, I don’t put two and two together. I can’t see far…I’m very in the moment. It’s always a later thing where I’m like, ‘Oh what have I done. Oh, oh my god.’

What causes the anxiety for you? Is it people learning the song’s about them or that people will be evaluating it…
That I’m saying such things in public! [laughs] It’s alwayslater that I realize that I’ve said such things in public. Always later. I never learn. I never ever learn. And there’s always a fevered night where I think like, ‘God, god, god, god.’ And the broader implications of everyone hearing it become crystal clear. It’s a bad night, it really isn’t funny! It’s a really bad night.

Was [‘Liz Phair’ follow-up] Somebody’s Miracle supposed to be more subdued in that way, or had you finally reached some pinnacle of…publicly embarrassing yourself, as you put it?
It’s mostly just the kind of songs I was writing. There may have been some of that because I’d just come off this arduous ordeal where I’d had to answer for the eponymous record and I had all these pissed-off fans that I didn’t want to lose, because I didn’t feel any different. Obviously I’d grown up and I’d done different things but I’m a very consistent person in that way. My personality’s always the same except I guess I did less drinking. You know what I mean? Like I’d grown up but I remember feeling a bit bruised and I didn’t want to do something controversial, I remember that. But I also was just writing those kinds of songs.

I feel like that record didn’t set out to piss anyone off and it still got the same cold shoulder.
Well maybe I’ll put this down to gender. Ready for this? People react to me anytime they react to my music, they can’t separate the two. They’re always judging me as a person. They can never just look at my music. And I’m not sure someone like Maroon 5 gets that. You know, “They’re a band, look what they did this time.” But women get judged for their personal decisions, like they can’t just take a record as the record, it’s like “Why did she decide to do this right now?” No one says of Paul Simon, “Why did he decide to make that? He politically said this earlier and now he’s going back on it…” There’s too much that people put on me as a woman,and they don’t separate the person from the music, and I do think that is kind of sexist. They think of me as a role model and I can’t think of a male solo artist who gets that kind of personal judgment like that.

If Adam Levine did a song called “Hot White Vagina” it might be an item for like, a week.
It wouldn’t be like smarmy, smug writing. It would be like “What’s up with that?” It’s a double standard.

I don’t think people would use terms like “career suicide.” I think to have a sex song without regret in it…

You mean like Lil Wayne’s “Pussy Monster” which I fucking love?

That song’s amazing.
But there’s no difference between that and “Hot White Cum!” Maybe his song’s better because he’s just awesome, but it’s the same spirit. Obviously I love it, too, it’s one of my favorite songs ever. But it’s the same thing. You better not write it that I think my song’s as good as his. But it’s the same exuberance, which is what rock and roll is about. Like, “I’m having awesome sex. Listen to this awesome, kind of funny songwriting but I mean it.”

When Guyville first came out, that was a shitstorm. Indie did not invite that right away. No sir. It was a brutal campaign, because half the people were like, “There’s so many worthy bands, she just came on the scene, nobody’s heard of her. She’s blonde, she’s white, she sells sex, she’s getting all the attention.” I was eviscerated multiple times in the indie world until it became…better than what I did later. [laughs]

After Pitchfork gave ‘Liz Phair’ a 0.0 out of 10, the Somebody’s Miracle review said they wasted the zero on the first one.
I’m all for funny hating, I don’t mind. But what I do mind is this fucking box that I can’t win. To be honest, to stick up for myself, you guys are idiots. A hundred years from now, it’s going to be cool that a woman like, said what she thought. It’s cool what I did, it just is, like as a large fact. Falling down, faceplanting, whatever I was doing, it was still rare. And the fact that they couldn’t see that, the fact that they were trying to…well I don’t know what they were trying to do. But they were missing the big picture. I wonder what would’ve happened if Girlysound, which had all these silly songs, if that had come after Guyville instead of before, would it be destroyed as well? Even though now it’s like all the rarities, I wonder what would’ve happened.

Now I’m making a much more, straight-ahead, the-way-I-ought-to kind of record, but not because I’m trying to garner any appreciation, it’s just because that’s what’s up in my creative world next.

Does it bug you that it will probably be regarded as some kind of “comeback” regardless of what the quality is?
No, I’m pretty much at peace. I’m pretty old now. I don’t see how I could be hated more and I don’t see how I could’ve been lauded more.

Do you know when it’s coming out?
No, much too early for that. We’re just kind of getting our sound for it.

What’s your favorite album of yours?
I don’t have one, I truly don’t. I’m not a favorite-picker, I’m not a hierarchical lister. I don’t have favorite records of all time, I’m an omnivore. I’m constantly chewing up new real estate. This winter I got super into jazz. I actually am against favorite-picking. Is that a word? Like a lateralist?

Do you have any regrets about ‘Liz Phair’?
No, not really. I like that record. I’ve always liked that record. When I listen back to it I usually think, “God that’s so good, what were they pissed about?” I don’t understand what it is to latch onto an artist and then expect them to…see I can’t even articulate it, you’ll have to do that. I wish I could’ve made them feel better; I don’t have a desire to upset people. I have a desire to free and to be provocative, but I came from a visual arts background and that’s what you’re supposed to do. Being challenging is what being an artist means to me. I wish something else could’ve been the focus, like people perceived it to be dumbed down, and I felt bad that’s what we ended up talking about all the time. But there’s more to that record: “Friend of Mine,” “Little Digger”…I thought “Firewalker” was a beautiful song. I’m sorry that’s what the conversation ended up being about all the time, but I don’t know that I could’ve controlled that. Except by not working with the Matrix, and I wouldn’t have given that up for anything in the world.

Uploaded on Feb 24, 2009

Music video by Liz Phair performing Why Can’t I?.

This interview was published two months ago by nousey.

The 15 most hated bands of last 30 years

John Mayer

John Mayer

Perhaps this is the only time you’ll see Limp Bizkit, Lana Del Rey and Insane Clown Posse on the same list

In order for something to be hated, it must first be loved; that love is what gives the hatred its roots. There will always be those unfathomably popular bands and singers that get an inordinate amount of airtime, and are loved by obsessed, cultish fans, only intensifying the hatred of those who realize one objective truth: that when you get down to it, the music isn’t even good. In fact, it downright sucks.

In the last week, Rush and the Eagles have been reappraised and argued about. We wondered which recent bands we might all be fighting about in 20 years. (When, by the way, they’ll still be terrible.)

Nickelback

Hating Nickelback used to be cool, but it’s so easy that it’s kind of just a fact, now. It’s sort of like hating Jonah Lehrer, partially because, like Lehrer, Nickelback plagiarizes itself and somehow still has fans. Oh, and also, Nickelback sucks.

98 Degrees

Even in the 1990s, there were only so many mock turtlenecks and cargo pants the front cover of Tiger Beat could handle before fans revolted against the fashion. In a musical genre already dominated by the Backstreet Boys and ‘N Sync, Nick Lachey’s ersatz boy band never really had a chance.

Smash Mouth

Smash Mouth is what would have happened if Limp Bizkit made love to a Lisa Frank poster. In theory, that sounds kind of amazing. In practice, it is not.

Black Eyed Peas

If the Black Eyed Peas, the creators of nonsensical hits like “Boom Boom Pow” and “My Humps,” qualify as music, then any kid with a Barbie Mix It Up DJ Turntable is Mozart. Who needs vocals when you’ve got auto-tune?

Insane Clown Posse

“The Most Hated Band in the World” gave birth to the most obnoxious fans in the world, the Juggalos, who are virtually a gang at this point. But at some point, founders Violent J and Shaggy 2 Dope sort of lost their way and now this is all that’s left of them:

Hootie & the Blowfish

If music on the radio in the early 1990s all sounded the same, that’s because it was All Hootie & The Blowfish, All The Time. The band’s bland music had no real edge and just enough melody to have comfortably become background noise, except then the booming baritone voice of Darius Rucker came on and bore into your skull like a drill. Twenty years later and chances are that you can still hear Rucker rattling around there in your brain.

The Goo Goo Dolls

Interchangeable with Matchbox 20, but technically not Matchbox 20. They are allegedly a different, other hated band.

John Mayer

John Mayer is that insufferable bro — you know, the one who wears a pukka bead necklace, is always shirtless, toting around a guitar at that house party you didn’t want to go to, anyway. He’ll suck the humor out of a joke and ruin the punch line every time, but no one else seems to care, because he’s a shirtless bro with a guitar. He probably likes Dane Cook. And misogyny.

Dave Matthews Band

Thirty-something adults who now now roll their eyes at Drake’s “YOLO” are no better: Chances are good that they used to follow around the cultish Dave Matthews Band 10 years ago, imparting profound, oft-quoted wisdom like “eat, drink and be merry” and “life is short but sweet for certain” while living it up in the suburbs and broadening their worldview by sneaking in SoCo and taking road trips to the Jersey Shore.

Lana Del Rey

It’s not that Lana Del Rey is bad, per se, it’s that her music seems fraudulent when compared to the ’60s-era musical acts she’s invoking. Her emotionless performance on “SNL” cemented her reputation as robotic, the product of overly manufactured pop perfection. She’s another reminder that we live in a post-Black Eyed Peas era.

Creed

Listening to even one song by Creed invokes a sea of nausea, as if your brain is fried from watching “Two and a Half Men” reruns for 24 hours. As Spin magazine put it, they’re like “Nickelback before there was Nickelback.”

Train

Basically the Goo Goo Dolls of the next millennium.

Phish

Reflecting on Phish’s 30 years of music, Grantland’s Steven Hyden puts the problem best: “In order to like Phish, you must consciously decide to like Phish.”

Limp Bizkit

Limp Bizkit is one of the rare band names that could not be made any more ridiculous if it were spelled “LiMp b!ZKiT,” an observation that makes the band’s unchecked anger so hard to take seriously. I mean, really, was the “he-said-she-said bullshit” that rage-inducing, Fred Durst?

Blink 182

Blink 182 began as an attempt to wean tweens off of boy bands, except they soon turned into self-parody when teenagers began to like them in earnest, ushering in an unforgivable era of wannabe-pop-punk rockers like Good Charlotte, Avril Lavigne and Jimmy Eat World.
Dishonorable Mentions not on this list: Kid Rock, Linkin Park, real Matchbox 20, Spin Doctors and Blues Traveler … rest assured you are all hated, as well.

The 21 Biggest Egos in the History of Pop Music

NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 13:  Kanye West takes the microphone from Taylor Swift and speaks onstage during the 2009 MTV Video Music Awards at Radio City Music Hall on September 13, 2009 in New York City.  (Photo by Kevin Mazur/WireImage)

NEW YORK – SEPTEMBER 13: Kanye West takes the microphone from Taylor Swift and speaks onstage during the 2009 MTV Video Music Awards at Radio City Music Hall on September 13, 2009 in New York City. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/WireImage)

Egos have been around for a long time. Odysseus had an ego, Louis XIV had an ego, Wu Zeitan had an ego. For as long as we’ve recorded history, there have been people feeling themselves, sometime for good reason. So, naturally, many of the people on this list are responsible for some truly amazing music, a feat that often leads to a lot of hubris. But who, in the grand history of pop music, is most convinced of their genius and relevance? Don’t worry, I’ve come up with a highly advanced formula to determine just that.

Each contestant’s ego was rated on five different aspects: 1) Self-Importance (how much better they think they are). 2) Self-Righteousness (how much better they think their ethics and practices are). 3) Diminished Self-Awareness (how little they’re aware of their own silliness). 4) Messiah Factor (how much they think they’re leading people out of darkness. And, lastly 5) General Dickishness (self-explanatory). The scores for each aspect are graded from 1-10, then all scores were added up into the ego’s representing number. In the event of a tie, I selected the contestant that just felt more deserving to by higher on the list.

Damon Albarn

Damon Albarn

21) Damon Albarn

Self-Importance: 6
Self-Righteousness: 8
Diminished Self-Awareness: 3
Messiah Factor: 2
General Dickishness: 8
Total: 27

Damon Albarn barely makes this list by being just enough of a dick to separate him
from boring stardom. Eventually the mountain of chiding, monosyllabic interviews and hoity-toity pop art pretensions earns you a reputation. Surprisingly, Albarn is perhaps the sanest of the Britpop icons.

Queen Beyonce

Queen Beyonce

20) Beyonce

Self-Importance: 9
Self-Righteousness: 7
Diminished Self-Awareness: 5
Messiah Factor: 6
General Dickishness: 1
Total: 28

Look, I know you don’t want to believe Beyonce has a big ego, and there’s no question she comes off as genuine and humble in plenty of interviews. But the woman has a museum dedicated to herself in her house. Is there anyone more caught up in the Beyonce mythology than Beyonce herself? Do you really think you could be friends with Beyonce?

Dee Snider

Dee Snider

19) Dee Snider

Self-Importance: 7
Self-Righteousness: 5
Diminished Self-Awareness: 7
Messiah Factor: 6
General Dickishness: 3
Total: 28

Dee Snider was the lead singer of Twisted Sister. Somehow that’s afforded him enough cultural capital to think he belongs on every VH1 talking-head retrospective that exists. If you are the guy from “We’re Not Gonna Take It” you are not an authority ofnanything.

Noel Gallagher

Noel Gallagher

18) Noel Gallagher

Self-Importance
: 6
Self-Righteousness: 8
Diminished Self-Awareness: 1
Messiah Factor: 5
General Dickishness: 10
Total: 30

I interviewed Noel Gallagher once. He told me he had a giant house that makes you feel like a rockstar, and implied that I would never even come close to tasting such a thing. It’s really hard to hate Noel, he’s a dick in such a pure, knowing way.

Adam Levine

Adam Levine

17) Adam Levine

Self-Importance: 7
Self-Righteousness: 5
Diminished Self-Awareness: 8
Messiah Factor: 5
General Dickishness: 7
Total: 32

I’m fairly certain Adam Levine has absolutely no idea why he should be on this list. That is what makes him tragic.

Steve Albini

Steve Albini

16) Steve Albini

Self-Importance: 5
Self-Righteousness: 8
Diminished Self-Awareness: 5
Messiah Factor: 5
General Dickishness: 10.
Total: 33

Steve Albini is so staunchly, antagonistically attached to his DIY ethics that it’s filled him with the same resentful, segregationist pretentions he was ostensibly fighting against. You’re not encouraging anyone when even Sonic Youth isn’t punk enough.

Madonna

Madonna

15) Madonna

Self-Importance: 8
Self-Righteousness: 9
Diminished Self-Awareness: 7
Messiah Factor: 7
General Dickishness: 2
Total: 33

If this was a couple decades ago, Madonna would probably be at the top of this list. But age has mellowed her, and in 2013 it seems like Madonna is very much comfortable in her Madonna-ness.

Gene Simmons

Gene Simmons

14) Gene Simmons

Self-Importance
: 8
Self-Righteousness: 6
Diminished Self-Awareness: 7
Messiah Factor: 8
General Dickishness: 8
Total: 37

In the next couple of years, Gene Simmons will be invited to teach a semester as a guest professor somewhere in America. He will not for one moment consider how lucky he is.

Henry Rollins

Henry Rollins

13) Henry Rollins

Self-Importance: 8
Self-Righteousness: 9
Diminished Self-Awareness: 6
Messiah Factor: 6
General Dickishness: 8
Total: 37

Henry Rollins is very good screaming in a punk band, and being a thoughtful person when asked a question. But along the way, it seems he’s started to believe he was the wisest person in the room.

Justin Bieber

Justin Bieber

12) Justin Bieber

Self-Importance: 9
Self-Righteousness: 4
Diminished Self-Awareness: 10
Messiah Factor: 7
General Dickishness: 8
Total: 38

There’s been enough written about Justin Bieber’s unsustainable ego that it’s not even worth a joke, but I will say I cannot wait to watch him fall into the sun.

Axl Rose

Axl Rose

11) Axl Rose

Self-Importance
: 8
Self-Righteousness: 7
Diminished Self-Awareness: 9
Messiah Factor: 8
General Dickishness: 6
Total: 38

Axl Rose believed the reason people liked Guns ‘N Roses was Axl Rose.

MIA

MIA

10) M.I.A.

Self-Importance
: 9
Self-Righteousness: 10
Diminished Self-Awareness: 6
Messiah Factor: 7
General Dickishness: 7
Total: 39

M.I.A. is the only person left on earth who thinks her music videos are transgressive.

Chris Cornell

Chris Cornell

9) Chris Cornell

Self-Importance: 8
Self-Righteousness: 8
Diminished Self-Awareness: 8
Messiah Factor: 7
General Dickishness: 9
Total: 40

Would it surprise you if Chris Cornell fucked to his own music? Like, would that even remotely shock you?

Bono

Bono

8) Bono

Self-Importance: 7
Self-Righteousness: 10
Diminished Self-Awareness: 9
Messiah Factor: 10
General Dickishness: 4
Total: 40

Here’s the thing. Bono isn’t a dick. In fact, by most accounts, he’s a perfectly pleasant man who’s incredibly passionate about the aesthetics and philosophies around music. But there are days when Bono is convinced that he controls the fate of the universe. There are moments where Bono feels he is the one thing fending off oblivion. That is the problem with Bono.

Lou Reed

Lou Reed

6) Lou Reed

Self-Importance: 9
Self-Righteousness: 8
Diminished Self-Awareness: 8
Messiah Factor: 9,
General Dickishness : 7
Total: 41

I mean, Lulu exists, so there isn’t anything really prescient to write here. I do wonder if Lou Reed ever believed he would someday be an entitled old man.

Courtney Love

Courtney Love

5) Courtney Love

Self-Importance: 8
Self-Righteousness: 9
Diminished Self-Awareness: 10
Messiah Factor: 5
General Dickishness: 10
Total: 42

The last time Courtney Love felt shame was sometime in 2002.

Kanye West

Kanye West

4) Kanye West

Self-Importance: 10
Self-Righteousness: 8
Diminished Self-Awareness: 6
Messiah Factor: 9
General Dickishness: 9
Total: 42

At this point it seems like Kanye West has internalized his reputation of being an egotistical monster, and has actually created a weird rampaging character constructed on the basis of that reputation. Really, it’s hard to understate just how weird Kanye is.

Prince

Prince

3) Prince

Self-Importance: 10
Self-Righteousness: 9
Diminished Self-Awareness: 10
Messiah Factor: 8
General Dickishness: 5
Total: 42

Prince has reached a level of punchdrunk superstardom that he actually thinks he is bigger than the internet itself.

Morrissey

Morrissey

2) Morrissey

Self-Importance: 9
Self-Righteousness: 10
Diminished Self-Awareness: 5
Messiah Factor: 9
General Dickishness: 10
Total: 43

In some ways I don’t think Morrissey even has an ego. He’s just so comfortably assured in his Morrissey-ness. It seems like he’s tried his hardest to embody even the pettiest and angriest imaginations of his role in pop culture. Because of that, there will never be another Morrissey.

Billy Corgan

Billy Corgan

1) Billy Corgan

Self-Importance: 10
Self-Righteousness: 10
Diminished Self-Awareness: 10
Messiah Factor: 10
General Dickishness: 10
Total: 50

This is it. If you could divide by zero when calculating the egos of famous musicians, it would compute the ever-staring bald head of Billy Corgan. He’s eluded shame, prudence, accountability, the antagonism of thousands of people, and the cold fact that the last good Smashing Pumpkins song came out sometime in 1998. Corgan has given us a truly virtuosic performance.

Liza Thorn

Liza Thorn

1) Liza Thorn

Self-Importance: 10
Self-Righteousness: 10
Diminished Self-Awareness: 10
Messiah Factor: 10
General Dickishness: 10
Total: 50

Back into the night. After a pit stop for some Cheerwine,  the next stop was a   heavy-metal bar in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, where a small recording company had organized a showcase of gothwave and dark, dark pop. You could count on one hand the number of people who weren’t wearing all black.   The Starred duo closed out the night, with its singer, Liza Thorn, bringing things to a narcotic lull. She looked wounded, and sounded even more so, in songs that sounded like funeral folk. It was unnerving, almost worrying. “Can I have some more monitor?” her band mate Matthew Koshak asked early in the set. “Can I have some more alcohol?” said Ms. Thorn.  She’s famous among The Walking Dead,  drinks like hell when singing in gritty, crusty and oh-so-cheap Brooklyn bars,  takes naps on Jim Morrison’s grave, and thinks she’s too hot to grant you an interview.  Loves to show her tiny breast and fur coats she buys at thrift shops.

Hope you enjoy this list of big egos!