Was Michael Hasting’s Death an Accident or was he Murdered?

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Didn’t have to know you to know the truth of what happened, my colleague…

Today was announced that Ex-CIA head Petraeus pleaded guilty to giving classified material to lover. This is nothing new that we need to know. We knew about it through Michael Hastings investigative journalism.

Michael Hastings Tears Petraeus to Shreds on CNN

What we need to know is who killed Michael Hastings, and why President Obama didn’t demand a full investigation of the young journalist’s death. Michael Hastings died in a single-vehicle car crash on June 18, 2013. Due to Hastings ongoing investigations of CIA chief John Brennan and previous critical investigations of other well known figures, there was speculation of foul play. 

Michael’s wife, Elise Jordan, also a journalist, played a role in clearing up speculations about her husband’s death as being nothing more than a “tragic accident”

Michael Hastings (January 28, 1980 – June 18, 2013) was an American journalist, author, contributing editor to Rolling Stone and reporter for BuzzFeed. He was raised in New York, Canada, and Vermont, and attended New York University. Hastings rose to prominence with his coverage of the Iraq War for Newsweek in the 2000s. After his fiancee Andrea Parhamovich was killed when her car was ambushed in Iraq, Hastings wrote his first book, I Lost My Love in Baghdad: A Modern War Story (2008), a memoir about his relationship with Parhamovich and the violent insurgency that took her life.

He received the George Polk Award for “The Runaway General” (2010), a Rolling Stone profile of General Stanley McChrystal, commander of NATO’s International Security Assistance Force in the Afghanistan war. The article documented the widespread contempt for civilian government officials by the general and his staff and ultimately resulted in McChrystal’s resignation. Hastings followed up with The Operators (2012), a detailed book account of his month-long stay with McChrystal in Europe and Afghanistan.

Michael became a vocal critic of the surveillance state during the investigation of reporters by the U.S. Department of Justice in 2013, referring to the restrictions on the freedom of the press by the Obama administration as a “war” on journalism. His last story, “Why Democrats Love to Spy On Americans”, was published by BuzzFeed on June 7. Hastings died in a fiery high-speed automobile crash on June 18, 2013, in Los Angeles, California. Blue Rider Press posthumously published his only novel, The Last Magazine (2014), a year after his death.

In February 2012, Hastings reported that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) had been keeping tabs on the Occupy Wall Street movement. An October 2011 DHS report named “SPECIAL COVERAGE: Occupy Wall Street” noted that “mass gatherings associated with public protest movements can have disruptive effects on transportation, commercial, and government services, especially when staged in major metropolitan areas”.

Bowe Bergdahl: America’s Last Prisoner of War

In June 2012, Hastings wrote an article about the struggles of Private First Class Bowe Bergdahl, who was captured by the Taliban when he walked off his Army base in Afghanistan in 2009 after being disillusioned with the war. In an interview with MSNBC anchor Alex Wagner, Hastings discussed his article and said, “There are elements within the Pentagon who don’t want to make the trade for Bowe Bergdahl”. A White House official subsequently responded to these allegations by informing Hastings that “details of Sergeant Bergdahl’s capture are irrelevant”. Bowe Berghdal was traded for five Taliban prisoners in June, 2014.

President Obama’s foreign policy

In May 2013, Hastings denounced President Barack Obama’s foreign policy, and accused MSNBC contributor Perry Bacon, Jr., of being a “stenographer” for the White House.

Soon after his death, some press reports described the crash as suspicious. Former U.S. National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counter-terrorism Richard A. Clarke said that what is known about the crash is “consistent with a car cyber attack“. He was quoted as saying “There is reason to believe that intelligence agencies for major powers—including the United States—know how to remotely seize control of a car. So if there were a cyber attack on [Hastings’] car—and I’m not saying there was, I think whoever did it would probably get away with it.”  Earlier the previous day, Hastings indicated that he believed he was being investigated by the FBI. In an email to colleagues, which was copied to and released by Hastings’ friend, Army Staff Sergeant Joe Biggs, Hastings said that he was “onto a big story”, that he needed to “go off the radar”, and that the FBI might interview them. WikiLeaks announced that Hastings had also contacted Jennifer Robinson, one of its lawyers, a few hours prior to the crash, and the LA Weekly reported that he was preparing new reports on the CIA at the time of his demise. His widow Elise Jordan said his final story was a profile of CIA Director John O. Brennan. The FBI released a statement denying that Hastings was being investigated.

The FBI file on Michael Hastings and its attachments (totaling 21 pages) were released to the public on September 24, 2013, after investigative journalist Jason Leopold and MIT doctoral candidate Ryan Shapiro filed a joint suit in July 2013 against the FBI for ignoring their FOIA requests for the file. The FBI failed to respond to the requests within the allotted 20-day period. On August 15, Leopold released a statement that read, “The Department of Justice (DOJ) has indicated that the FBI has likely located responsive records pertaining to investigative journalist Michael Hastings”. Al Jazeera, along with Shapiro, released results from a FOIA request showing that the FBI’s Washington field office had opened a file on Hastings in June 2012 to store “unclassified media articles” and “memorialize controversial reporting by Rolling Stone magazine on June 7, 2012″. The attorney who filed the FOIA lawsuit, Jeff Light, suggested that it was uncommon for the FBI to open such files on reporters.

From The New York Magazine:

At the end of his life, Michael Hastings, like many of the progressive journalists he counted among his friends, felt besieged by an overreaching government. Hastings was living in Los Angeles, and at a Beverly Hills theater in April, he took part in a panel discussion about the documentary War on Whistleblowers: Free Press and the National Security State.

Interviewed in May on The Young Turks, a talk show on Current TV, Hastings railed against the Obama administration, which “has clearly declared war on the press”; the only recourse, he said, was for the press to respond: “We declare war on you.” On May 31, he dashed off an urgent tweet: “first they came for manning. Then Assange. Then fox. Then the ap.drake and the other whistle-blowers. Any nyt reporters too.” He attended screenings of his friend Jeremy Scahill’s film Dirty Wars, which seeks to expose “the hidden truth behind America’s expanding covert wars,” and when leaks about the NSA began appearing in The Guardian, and Edward Snowden was charged with espionage, Hastings was deeply troubled by the revelations and the Justice Department’s response. On June 7, his last post for BuzzFeed, where he was a staff writer, focused on “Why Democrats Love to Spy on Americans,” and at the time of his death, Hastings was working on a profile of CIA director John Brennan for Rolling Stone.

It was for Rolling Stone, where Hastings had a contract, that he’d written “The Runaway General,” the 2010 article that resulted in the cashiering of General Stanley McChrystal, America’s commander in Afghanistan, and made his name as a journalist. Mark Leibovich, in this summer’s inside-the-­Beltway big read, This Town, describes Hastings’s McChrystal piece as “the most consequential” journalism of 2010 and possibly Obama’s entire first term. But despite going after big game, Hastings tended to be nonchalant about possible repercussions. “Whenever I’d been reporting around groups of dudes whose job it was to kill people,” he said once, “one of them would usually mention that they were going to kill me.

By the middle of June, though, Hastings, then 33, had become openly afraid. Helicopters are a common sight in the Hollywood Hills, but he had told Jordanna Thigpen, a neighbor he’d become close to, that there were more of them in the sky than usual, and he was certain they were tracking him. On Saturday the 15th, he called Matt Farwell, his writing partner, and said Farwell might be interviewed by the FBI. Farwell was unsettled. “He was being really cagey over the phone, which was odd, very odd,” Farwell says. On the 17th, Hastings e-mailed colleagues at BuzzFeed to warn them that “the Feds are interviewing my ‘close friends and associates’ ”; he was “onto a big story” and needed to go “off the rada[r] for a bit … hope to see you all soon.”

“He was deeply agitated,” says The Young Turks host Cenk Uygur. Since Hastings didn’t want to say anything more over e-mail or the phone, Farwell, who lived in Virginia, set up a lunch for him the following Thursday with a trusted friend of Farwell’s, also in L.A., so that she could pass along whatever Hastings had to tell him on her forthcoming trip East.

The lunch never happened. At 4:20 a.m. on Tuesday, June 18, Hastings’s silver Mercedes C250 coupe, speeding south on Highland Avenue, crossed Melrose, jumped the median, hit a palm tree, and exploded. The charred body of the driver was identified by the Los Angeles coroner as John Doe 117 until fingerprints confirmed that the deceased was Michael Hastings.

Sergeant Joe Biggs, who met Hastings in 2008, when the reporter, on assignment for GQ, was embedded with his unit in Afghanistan, hadn’t spoken to his friend in three months, but Hastings had BCC’d him on the June 17 e-mail to BuzzFeed colleagues. “I tried calling him when I got that e-mail,” Biggs says, “ ’cause I felt so fucking scared, because it didn’t seem like him.” Biggs e-mailed BuzzFeed, too. “They weren’t helpful at all. I kept e-mailing back, ‘What should we do? I’m not a journalist. I don’t know how to go about this stuff.’ They never responded to me.” Biggs tried contacting other media to let them know about the ominous e-mail; the only person who got back to him was a local L.A. reporter. “If that thing didn’t get released,” Biggs told me when I first called him, two weeks after Hastings’s death, “people would keep thinking it was an accident.”

Hastings lived as he died. On the small side, with blue eyes and scruffy good looks that suggested Jude Law’s little brother, he did everything fast: chain-smoking Parliament Lights, calling and e-mailing people late at night, speaking in a jittery torrent, churning out copy. (The first, long draft of his McChrystal article was a 48-hour production.) “The dude was exhausting,” Farwell says. “He just kind of vibrated energy. He had a deep well of moral outrage and sadness that I think goes back to a lot of the hypocrisy he saw and felt.”

WikiLeaks poured on accelerant, tweeting on June 19 that “Michael Hastings death has a very serious nonpublic complication. We will have more details later.” It would turn out that Hastings had sent one of his I’m-being-investigated e-mails to WikiLeaks lawyer Jennifer Robinson. An unusual public disclaimer by the FBI, stating that Hastings wasn’t under investigation by the Bureau, became fuel for further conspiracy mongering. And Richard Clarke, the former counter­terrorism czar, told the Huffington Post that “my rule has always been you don’t knock down a conspiracy theory until you can prove it . And in the case of Michael Hastings, what evidence is available publicly is consistent with a car cyber attack.” Inside Edition asked: “Was it an accident or was it murder?

Sources: Wikileaks, The New Yorker

Flashback: Nirvana Play a Bit of Boston’s ‘More Than a Feeling’

Nirvana – Smells Like Teen Spirit (Live at Reading 1992)

 

 

When Kurt Cobain first came up with the “Smells Like Teen Spirit” riff, he didn’t think he had anything that special. “It was such a cliched riff,” he said. “It was so close to a Boston riff or ‘Louie Louie.’ When I came up with the guitar part, Krist [Novoselic] looked at me and said, ‘That is so ridiculous.'”

After the song became an enormous hit, many others pointed out that the main riff did indeed sound like Boston’s “More Than a Feeling,” even though they’re in different keys. They probably weren’t similar enough for Boston’s Tom Scholz to file any sort of legal action, but he said he didn’t mind at all.

“I take it as a major compliment,” he said in 1994, “even if it was completely accidental.”

The group made fun of the whole thing in the summer of 1992 when they played the Reading Festival in England. After the opening bars of the song, Kirst Novoselic and Dave Grohl sang the chorus of “More Than a Feeling” while Bivouac drummer Antony “Dancing Tony” Hodgkinson danced around wildly. After about 18 goofy seconds, Novoselic launches into the “I see Marianne walk away” part, but Kurt interrupts him by beginning the song for real. It’s a great moment, though completely absent from the official Live at Reading CD. You can watch it right here though.

A couple of years ago, Tom Scholz admitted that he’s extremely unfamiliar with Nirvana’s work since he has barely heard any new music since 1974. “The only times when I’ll hear other music will be at the ice skating rink or the gym,” he said. “It’s been debated whether [Nirvana playing a bit of “More Than a Feeling”] was homage or thumbing their nose. Regardless, Nirvana was, from what I’ve heard, a great band. I was really impressed by the couple of things I heard. Regardless of what the context was, it’s an honor to be heard in the same airspace as Nirvana.”

Kasabian Crush New York: Behind the U.K. Band’s Terminal 5 Invasion

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Backstage and onstage at an explosive show supporting their most recent U.K. Number One, ’48:13′

Kasabian released 48:13, their fourth consecutive U.K. Number One album, and played a headlining set in a pyramid stage at the country’s Glastonbury Festival in June. Three months later, they returned to the U.S., bringing the North American leg of their tour to New York’s Terminal 5 on September 27th. Rolling Stone caught up with the group in Manhattan, documenting their busy day in the Big Apple from the pool hall to the front row of their sold-out show.

BeforeKasabian’ssoundcheck, the band went to the Green Door in Hell’s Kitchen, a cozy bar where guitarist Sergio “Serge”Pizzorno (left) and singer TomMeighan (right) could shoot pool.

Having finished the game – solids appears to have won – Meighan and Pizzorno sit at the bar.

Soundcheck begins, and the band faces an empty Terminal 5.

The lights turn pink and (from left to right) bassist Chris Edwards, Pizzorno and guitarist Tim Carter discuss the set list.

The agreed-upon set list.

Drummer Ian Matthews warms up on the ledge that overlooks the Terminal 5 stage.

A crew member bringsPizzorno’s guitars to the stage.

Meighan mugs for the camera. The band’s pre-show playlist includes, at this moment, theBeastie Boys’ “Intergalactic” and up next, the Beatles.

About to go on.
Meighan onstage. The band would open with one of their new tracks, “Bumblebee,” before turning toward “Shoot the Runner” (from 2006) and “Underdog” (2009).

Meighan addresses the sold-out crowd. A set highlight came when the band turned the intro from “The Doberman” into 2009 track “Take Aim” midway through the show.

Pizzorno and Meighan work it.
A rock star’s rock star,Pizzorno knocks out a big riff in front of the drum riser.

The band laughs about the first portion of the show while catching their breath before the encore.

Pizzorno leaps during an encore performance of “Vlad the Impaler.” They would follow the song with a cover of Fatboy Slim‘s “Praise You.”

The view from the front of stage asKasabian took their final bow after closing with 2004’s breakout single, “L.S.F. (Lost Souls Forever).”

Exhausted, Pizzorno walks offstage. Kasabian’s 48:13 tour would continue the next night with a show in Washington, D.C.

Hear Julian Casablancas + the Voidz’ Wonderfully Bizarre New LP ‘Tyranny’

The last time Julian Casablancas released an album outside of the Strokes, 2009’s Phrazes for the Young, Rolling Stone described it as “his version of Thom Yorke’s The Eraser,” a record featuring “guitars submarined by wild-angled synths, off-kilter beats tripping up big ballads.” “A few songs have the old leather-jacket kick,” Jon Dolan wrote. “But things get weirder as he explores alienation from a Lower East Side he once ruled.”

Having moved upstate, the Strokes frontman is now backed by a band called the Voidz – Jeramy Gritter and Amir Yaghmai on guitar, Jeff Kite on keys, Jake Bercovici on bass and Alex Carapetis on drums – and together, they are ready to release an incredibly eclectic new album, simply titled Tyranny. The LP hits stores Tuesday (and can be pre-ordered at the Cult Records website), but you can listen to an exclusive advance stream of all 12 songs right here. It’s even got some of that old leather-jacket kick.

“Tyranny has come in many forms throughout history,” Casablancas said in a statement, explaining the title. “Now, the good of business is put above anything else, as corporations have become the new ruling body. Most decisions seem to be made like ones of a medieval king: Whatever makes profit while ignoring and repressing the truth about whatever suffering it may cause (like pop music, for that matter).”

U2 Surprise Album “Songs of Innocence”

U2 - Photo: Paolo Pellegrin.  PUBLICITY 2014

U2 – Photo: Paolo Pellegrin. PUBLICITY 2014

 

U2 invades your iTunes, get the eviction notice ready

 They release new album for free in iTunes

You may or may not like U2 or its frontman, but no other rock band does rebirth like U2.  No other band – certainly of U2’s duration, commercial success and creative achievement – believes it needs rebirth more and so often. But even by the standards of transformation on 1987’s The Joshua Tree and 1991’s Achtung! Baby, Songs of Innocence – U2’s first studio album in five years – is a triumph of dynamic, focused renaissance: 11 tracks of straightforward rapture about the life-saving joys of music, drawing on U2’s long palette of influences and investigations of post-punk rock, industrial electronics and contemporary dance music. “You and I are rock & roll,” Bono shouts in “Volcano,” a song about imminent eruption, through a propulsive delirium of throaty, striding bass, alien-choral effects and the Edge’s rusted-treble jolts of Gang of Four-vintage guitar. Bono also sings this, earlier in a darker, more challenging tone: “Do you live here or is this a vacation?” For U2, rock & roll was always a life’s work – and the work is never done.

Songs of Innocence is aptly named, after William Blake’s 1789 collection of poems about man’s perpetually great age of discovery – childhood. For the first time, after decades of looking abroad for inspiration – to American frontier spirituality, Euro-dance-party irony and historic figures of protest such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Nelson Mandela – Bono, the Edge, bassist Adam Clayton and drummer Larry Mullen Jr. have taken the long way ’round to metamorphosis: turning back andinward, for the first time on a whole record, to their lives and learning as boys on the way to uncertain manhood (and their band) in Dublin.

Bono’s lyrics are striking in their specific, personal history. In “Cedarwood Road,” named after a street where he lived, the singer remembers the fear and unrequited anger that drove him to music andto be heard – and which won’t go away. “I’m still standing on that street/Still need an enemy,” he admits against Clayton and Mullen’s strident, brooding rhythm and the enraged stutter of the Edge’s guitar. “Raised by Wolves” isa tension of metronome-like groove and real-life carnage (“There’s a man in a pool of misery . . . a red sea covers the ground”) based on a series of car bombs that bloodied Dublin one night in the Seventies.

In “Iris (Hold Me Close),” Bono sings to his mother, who died when he was 14, through a tangle of fondness and still-desperate yearning, in outbreaks of dreamy neo-operatic ascension over a creamy sea of keyboards and Clayton’s dignified-disco bass figure. “You took me by the hand/I thought I was leading you,” Bono recalls in a kind of embarrassed bliss. “But it was you who made me your man/Machine,” he adds – a playful shotgun reference to his youthful poetic conceit in Boy‘s “Twilight” (“In the shadows boy meets man”) and his wife Ali. The teenage Bono once gave her Kraftwerk’s The Man-Machine as a gift while they were dating.
For U2 – and Bono in particular – the first step on the road out of Dublin was the sound of a voice, and they name it in the opening track, “The Miracle (of Joey Ramone).” U2 have always been open in their gratitude to New York punk and the Ramones in particular, and this homage to unlikely heroism – that kid you least expect to take on the world and win – is suitable honor: a great, chunky guitar riff and a beat like a T. Rex stomp, glazed with galactic-Ronettes vocal sugar. “I woke up,” Bono sings, “at the moment when the miracle occurred/Heard a song that made some sense out of the world.” U2 also pay due diligence to the Clash in “This Is Where You Can Reach Me Now,” dedicated to Joe Strummer, and there is a strong hint of the Beach Boys’ allure – their standing invitation to a utopia far from the Dublin grit and rain – in the Smile-style flair of the chanting harmonies in “California (There Is No End to Love).” “Blood orange sunset brings you to your knees,” Bono croons in an awed register. “I’ve seen for myself.”These are the oldest stories in rock & roll – adolescent restlessness; traumatic loss; the revelation of rescue hiding in a great chorus or power chord. But Songs of Innocence is the first time U2 have told their own tales so directly, with the strengths and expression they have accumulated as songwriters and record-makers. This album was famous, long before release, for its broken deadlines and the indecision suggested by its multiple producers: Brian Burton a/k/a Danger Mouse, Paul Epworth of Adele fame and Ryan Tedder of the pop band One Republic. Those credits are misleading. Burton, Epworth and Tedder all co-produced “The Miracle (of Joey Ramone)” and contributed keyboards; that’s Epworth on the additional slide guitar in “Cedarwood Road”; and Burton arranged the chorale in “Volcano.” But the extra hands and textures are thoroughly embedded in the memoir. There is no time when the telling sounds like it was more than the work of the four who lived it.And it is a salvation, U2 believe, that keeps on giving. “Every breaking wave on the shore/Tells the next one that there will be one more,” Bono promises in the tidal sun-kissed electronica of “Every Breaking Wave.” And “The Miracle (of Joey Ramone)” comes with a pledge to every stranded dreamer who now hears Rocket to Russia, Give ‘Em Enough Rope or someU2 for the first time and is somehow, permanently, changed. “We can hear you,” Bono swears. “Your voices will be heard.”Just find one of your own. Then shout as hard as you can.

David Fincher’s ‘Gone Girl’ to Open 52nd New York Film Festival

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David Fincher’s ‘Gone Girl’ to Open 52nd New York Film Festival ‘Social Network’ director’s adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s bestseller will premiere at fest’s opening night 1 Comment Ben Affleck in “Gone Girl.”

‘Social Network’ director’s adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s bestseller will premiere at fest’s opening night

David Fincher’s Gone Girl, his adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s bestselling thriller about a husband suspected of murdering his missing wife, will kick off the 52nd New York Film Festival. The film, starring Ben Affleck, Rosamund Pike, Neil Patrick Harris and Tyler Perry, is scheduled make its world premiere as the festival’s opening-night selection on September 26th.

Gone Girl is so many things at once,” NYFF Director Kent Jones said in a press release.    “[It’s] sharp as a razor about many aspects of American life that have been untouched by movies, very tough and just as funny, brilliantly acted, and 100% entertaining — a wild ride from start to finish…directed by one of the best filmmakers alive. I’m so proud to have the world premiere of this film as our opening night.”

This is not the first time that Fincher has supplied the festival with a film for its first-night slot; The Social Network, his Oscar-nominated take on the origins of Facebook, kicked off the NYFF with its world premiere in 201o. The festival has long been a launching pad for awards-season hopefuls and big-name fall releases, especially in terms of its opening selections: Pulp Fiction opened the festival in 1995; Clint Eastwood’s Mystic River in 2003; Ang Lee’s Life of Pi in 2012; and Paul Greengrass’ Captain Philips in 2013.

The rest of the New York Film Festival’s lineup is expected to be announced within the next month. Gone Girl will hit theaters on October 3rd.

Gone Girl – Das perfekte Opfer – (engl.)

Something’s afoot in the first trailer for David Fincher’s upcoming mystery thriller, Gone Girl, an adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s novel of the same name. The new clip finds Ben Affleck as Nick Dunne, reeling in the aftermath of the disappearance of his wife, Amy (Rosamund Pike), amidst search parties, candlelight vigils and incessant television coverage. The mood, however, soon shifts when we’re shown shots of the couple fighting and detectives scouring the Dunne residence for clues. The clip ends with a smarmy sounding Nick telling a TV interviewer: “I did not kill my wife. I am not a murderer.”

While Elvis Costello’s devotional “She” provides the trailer with its eerily fitting soundtrack, Nine Inch Nails frontman Trent Reznor and longtime collaborator Atticus Ross are behind Gone Girl‘s score. Over on the film’s website, you can get a taste of the duo’s latest collaboration, a serene but disconcerting ambience of woodwind-like synths. The full soundtrack and score will be available this fall; Gone Girl hits theaters on October 3rd.

Reznor and Ross have scored two other Fincher films in the past: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, for which they picked up a Golden Globe nod, and The Social Network
, which earned the pair an Oscar for Best Original Score. In other Fincher-related news, the director will no longer helm the upcoming Steve Jobs biopic that would have reunited him with Social Network writer Aaron Sorkin and producer Scott Rudin, according to The Hollywood Reporter. During negotiations, Fincher was reportedly seeking $10 million up front in fees, as well as significant control over marketing, like he was given for The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. But that number did not jive with the film’s studio, Sony, who are looking to be more fiscally responsible after a disappointing 2013. Fincher could re-enter negotiations, but an industry source said he would have to scale back that $10 million, calling the figure “ridiculous,” and adding: “You’re not doing Transformers here. You’re not doing Captain America. This is quality — it’s not screaming commerciality. He should be rewarded in success but not up front.”

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SEARCH FOR AMAZING AMY CONTINUES

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Click image above to listen to soundtract.

While Elvis Costello’s devotional “She” provides the trailer with its eerily fitting soundtrack, Nine Inch Nails frontman Trent Reznor and longtime collaborator Atticus Ross are behind Gone Girl‘s score. Over on the film’s website, you can get a taste of the duo’s latest collaboration, a serene but disconcerting ambience of woodwind-like synths. The full soundtrack and score will be available this fall; Gone Girl hits theaters on October 3rd.

Reznor and Ross have scored two other Fincher films in the past: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, for which they picked up a Golden Globe nod, and The Social Network, which earned the pair an Oscar for Best Original Score.

Pink Floyd To Release First New Album in 20 Years This Fall

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Pink Floyd is about to return with their first album in 20 years. Polly Samson, the wife of singer-guitarist David Gilmour, surprised fans on Saturday when she casually announced over Twitter that the band has a new record in the works and it’s coming out this fall. A representative for Gilmour confirmed the release of the album.

“Pink Floyd album out in October is called ‘The Endless River,'” Samson wrote. “Based on 1994 sessions is Rick Wright’s swansong and very beautiful.” (Keyboardist and founding member Wright died of cancer in 2008 at the age of 65.)

The band had just celebrated the 20th anniversary of 1994’s The Division Bell with an extravagant reissue of the album on July 1st. The new material appears to be connected to unreleased recordings made during the Division Bell sessions.

Durga McBroom-Hudson, a singer who toured with Pink Floyd in the 1980s and 1990s and is apparently involved in the new project, offered more details on The Endless River through her Facebook page. “The recording did start during The Division Bell sessions (and yes, it was the side project originally titled ‘The Big Spliff’ that Nick Mason spoke about),” she explained. “Which is why there are Richard Wright tracks on it. But David and Nick have gone in and done a lot more since then. It was originally to be a completely instrumental recording, but I came in last December and sang on a few tracks. David then expanded on my backing vocals and has done a lead on at least one of them. That’s the song you see being worked on in the photo.” She went on to emphasize that the new album will consist entirely of unreleased songs.

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