Spain’s Orwellian “Citizens Security Law” Gag

By Melissa Dykes
Global Research, August 29, 2015
Daily Sheeple 27 August 2015
Region: Europe
Theme: Police State & Civil Rights

750px-Flag_of_Spain.svg_-400x266If you think our First Amendment rights are being trampled here in America left and right, check out what’s going on in Spain.

This woman posted the following picture of a police car parked in a handicapped spot on her Facebook page with the caption “Park where you bloody well please and you won’t even be fined.”

Now, because of Spain’s Orwellian “Citizens Security Law” which went into effect July 1st, they have fined her €800 or nearly $900 USD simply for sharing the picture on social media. Police were reportedly able to track her down within 48 hours.

That’s because the so-called “Citizens Security Law,” which the people in Spain lovingly refer to as the “gagging law,” has a clause that says, “the unauthorised use of images of police officers that might jeopardise their or their family’s safety or that of protected facilities or police operations”. The fines for this can go up to an astounding €30,000 (nearly $33,700 USD).

Apparently sharing the fact that your local officer can take up a parking spot designated for a handicapped person, an act you would be heavily fined for, is not “legal” in Spain because it “endangers” that cop’s “personal safety.”

When the police were asked how the photo had put them at risk under the definition of the law, spokesman Fernando Portillo said, “the officers felt the woman had impugned their honour by posting the picture,” according to The Guardian. Portillo said police can park wherever they want when they are in an emergency, and the officer in the photo parked in the handicapped spot because someone had vandalized a nearby park.

If you think about this logically, it obviously makes no sense. The only way a picture like that would endanger that cop’s safety is if someone saw the photo and got mad enough to commit violence against the cop because he parked in a handicapped spot… in which case, it would actually be the cop endangering his own safety and making himself look bad by parking in a handicapped spot to begin with.

Then again, there’s really no point in trying to argue with an Orwellian police state. It’s not there to make sense. It’s there to control everyone. Completely.

Not that it’s even necessary, but to further prove this is simply all about keeping Spain’s citizens from speaking out against their police in a public forum, the first guy who got slapped with a fine under the law was someone who merely called his local police “a pack of slackers” on Facebook.

Source The Daily Sheeple
Copyright © Melissa Dykes, Daily Sheeple, 2015

Sinn Féin ‘heavily involved’ in push for ETA ceasefire, says Gerry Adams

GERRY ADAMS LEADER OF SINN FEIN

GERRY ADAMS LEADER OF SINN FEIN

Writing in the Guardian, Gerry Adams says his party held a series of meetings with Basque separatists

Sinn Féin’s leader, Gerry Adams, said today his party had been heavily involved in pushing the Basque separatist group Eta towards calling a ceasefire at the weekend.

As the Spanish government ruled out negotiations and claimed Eta had announced the ceasefire because it was now too weak to carry out terrorist attacks, Adams, writing in the Guardian today, said the move had been the result of months of talks among Basque separatists.

“This dialogue also involved senior Sinn Féin representatives, including myself,” he said. “Sometimes the discussions were held in the Basque country, sometimes in Belfast and on a number of occasions in recent years Sinn Féin representatives travelled to Geneva for meetings with Basque representatives.” It was not clear whether the meetings were with members of Eta, or only with other radical separatist groups from the Basque country.

Eta had responded by calling a ceasefire that, Adams hoped, would be grasped by the Spanish government as an opportunity to start a peace process that might follow some of the principles used in Ulster.

The Sinn Féin leader’s words contrasted, however, with the reaction of prime minister José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero’s government in Madrid, which said it would not talk to Eta.

“Eta kills in order to impose itself, that means one cannot [have] dialogue,” said the interior minister, Alfredo Pérez Rubalcaba. “The word truce, as the idea of a limited peace to open a process of dialogue, is dead.”

Zapatero’s government last tried negotiating with Eta when it called a ceasefire four years ago. That truce ended nine months later when a bomb at Madrid’s Barajas airport killed two people. Rubalcaba agreed that Eta had effectively been observing a ceasefire for months, but said this was because it wanted to reorganise and escape intense police pressure in Spain and parts of Europe.

“What they do not say is that they decided to stop months ago because they were so weak,” he said. “Eta has stopped because it cannot do anything, and also in order to rebuild itself.”

He claimed the ceasefire announcement was also an attempt by Eta to keep control over the increasingly tired and fractious radical Basque separatist groups that have traditionally backed a terrorism campaign that has claimed more than 800 lives over four decades.

These are the same groups, headed by former leaders of the banned Batasuna separatist party, that Sinn Féin has been helping.

“The aim is to try to cover up their weakness,” said Rubalcaba. “Because if Eta is weak those groups in the separatist worldwho are rebellious against them grow in strength.”

One of Eta’s founders, Julen de Madariaga, said that the group’s current weakness was more the result of a loss of support among ordinary Basques than due to police action.

“The main reason for Eta’s weakness is that over the past 12 to 15 years the people who used to support it have abandoned it,” Madariaga, who distanced himself from the group’s tactics years ago, told the Guardian by telephone. He said the decision by leaders of the banned Batasuna party to stop bowing to Eta’s line and to push for peace was more than overdue.”It was time that Batasuna made things clear to Eta and took charge of itself,” he said.

Analysts pointed to a double bind for Eta as it was squeezed by police on one side and by its own supporters on the other.

“The ceasefire statement aims to give political meaning to a strategic rest decreed by Eta’s leaders six months ago in order to reorganise internally to cope with police pressure,” wrote Florencio Dominguez, an Eta expert, in La Vanguardia newspaper.

Dominguez pointed to the arrest in February of Ibon Gojeaskoetxea, a senior Eta commander, as a key moment. That arrest was hailed as the fifth time in two years that police had detained the person directly in charge of Eta’s handful of remaining armed units.

At the same time, police had prevented new units from being formed in several parts of Spain, and discovered Eta’s latest bombmaking laboratory. It had also dismantled its new bases in Portugal, to where Eta had hoped to move its support infrastructure that historically had been based in France.

It was in February, too, that Batasuna leaders won the support of thousands of local activists for a proposal for a new process of talks over the future of the Basque country that would require Eta to give up violence.

“Sunday’s statement did not come out of the blue,” said Adams. “I believe it has the potential to bring about a permanent end to the conflict with the Spanish state.”

EUSKADI TA ASKATASUNA DECLARES PERMANENT CEASEFIRE

 

Basque separatist group says ceasefire called four months ago will be permanent and verifiable by international observers

 

The armed Basque separatist group Eta has declared that a ceasefire it called four months ago is now “permanent and general” and open to verification by international observers.

In a statement released to the media the group said: “Eta has decided to declare a permanent and general ceasefire which will be verifiable by the international community.

“This is Eta’s firm commitment towards a process to achieve a lasting resolution and towards an end to the armed confrontation.”

The statement gives no details of how the ceasefire could be confirmed by observers.

The group calls for “dialogue and negotiation” which it says should end with some sort of vote among Basques. It also calls for a Basque right to independence to be formally recognised.

The solution to Basque independence “will come through the democratic process with dialogue and negotiation as its tools”, the statement says.

Three masked members of Eta, which is classified as a terrorist group by the European Union, have also recorded a video statement.

Rumours that Eta would take a step like this had been circulating for weeks.

There was no immediate comment from the government of socialist prime minister, José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero. Madrid is sceptical about Eta’s intentions and has demanded that the group simply declare it has given up violence once and for all.

Observers warn that Eta has called permanent ceasefires before and has later called them off. A previous ceasefire in 2006 ended with the bombing of Madrid’s Barajas airport in which two people were killed.

More than 800 people have died in Eta violence since the group was founded in 1968, but it declared a halt to “offensive armed actions” in September.

The group was believed to have been severely weakened by hundreds of arrests in recent years.