The Many Solo Moods of George Harrison: Inside ‘The Apple Years’ Box

LONDON - 24th JUNE: George Harrison (1943-2001) from The Beatles arrives at EMI Studios in Abbey Road, London for a press call before the recording of 'All You Need is Love' on 24th June 1967. (Photo by Mark and Colleen Hayward/Redferns)

LONDON – 24th JUNE: George Harrison (1943-2001) from The Beatles arrives at EMI Studios in Abbey Road, London for a press call before the recording of ‘All You Need is Love’ on 24th June 1967. (Photo by Mark and Colleen Hayward/Redferns)

“It’s a great forest to explore,” Dhani Harrison says of The Apple Years 1968-75, the first boxed reissue – seven CDs with bonus tracks and a DVD – of the early solo work of his father, Beatles guitarist George Harrison. “People will be surprisingly pleased with how strange some of it is.”

The heart of the set, overseen by Dhani, is the 1970 masterpiece All Things Must Pass, and the spiritual 1973 hit Living in the Material World. But the set opens with George’s 1968 immersion in classical raga, Wonderwall Music, and the weirdly prophetic 1969 Moog recital, Electronic Sounds. “Every synth and dance record ever made is in there,” Dhani claims.At the other end of the box are 1974’s earthy Dark Horse and 1975’s R&B-tinged Extra Texture (Read All About It). “The deep tracks on those albums are among the best he ever wrote,” Dhani says. Dark Horse now includes an acoustic outtake of the title song, but Dhani says that The Apple Years is meant to celebrate “the canon. It’s been 13 years since my dad died. I’d like to let him speak with this music for a while.”

Watch Dhani Harrison Perform one of His Father’s Songs on ‘Conan’

The Beatles in Mono

Beatles-in-mono-773

The Beatles

 

The Beatles in Mono is a box set compilation comprising the remastered monophonic recordings by The Beatles. The set was released on 9 September 2009, the same day the remastered stereo recordings and companion The Beatles Stereo Box Set were also released, along with The Beatles: Rock Band video game. The remastering project for both mono and stereo versions was led by EMI senior studio engineers Allan Rouse and Guy Massey. It was announced that the box set will be remastered (this time from the actual tapes and not the digital process) again on 180-gram heavyweight vinyl and it will be released on September 8, 2014.

The Mono Box Set was released to reflect the fact that the Beatles’ catalogue (aside from Abbey Road, Let It Be and Yellow Submarine) was originally released in mono, with the stereo versions as an addition. Many feel that these mono mixes reflect the true intention of the band. For example, in the case of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, all the mono mixes were done together with the Beatles themselves, throughout the recording of the album, whereas the stereo mixes were done in only six days by Abbey Road personnel George Martin, Geoff Emerick and Richard Lush after the album had been finished, with none of the Beatles attending. George Harrison commented:

At that time […] the console was about this big with four faders on it. And there was one speaker right in the middle […] and that was it. When they invented stereo, I remember thinking ‘Why? What do you want two speakers for?’, because it ruined the sound from our point of view. You know, we had everything coming out of one speaker; now it had to come out of two speakers. It sounded like … very … naked.”“The goal was simple: make them sound like the artist intended.”
Steve Berkowitz

The thirteen-disc collection contains the remastered mono versions of every Beatles album released in true mono. The original 1965 stereo mixes of Help! and Rubber Soul are included as bonuses on their respective albums. (In 1986 both albums had been remixed by George Martin for their CD release in 1987.) The box contains a new two-disc compilation album titled Mono Masters, which compiles all the mono mixes of singles, B-sides and EP tracks that did not originally appear on any of the United Kingdom albums or Magical Mystery Tour.

Universal and Apple’s first official unveiling of “The Beatles’ original mono studio albums on vinyl”. The more canny of you will realize that the Beatles’ original studio albums are already available on vinyl, but time and entropy hasn’t been kind to the versions released between 1963 and 1968. So, on September 8 (September 9 in the US), The Beatles’ nine UK albums, plus the American-compiled Magical Mystery Tour, and the Mono Masters collection of non-album tracks will be released in newly mastered mono versions on 180-gram vinyl LPs with lovingly replicated original artwork.

He places the specially designed Ortofon cartridge on the first track, Love Me Do. It sounds clear and beefy, but not falsely so. Instrumental fluffs and those plosive ‘p’s on “pretend” have been kept in. It’s like someone has polished the original 51-year-old pressing with the best record cleaner in the world. We hear ten tracks in full. Here are the Top 5.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

U.S. Box

U.S. Box

 

The last song, the mysteriously lovely Goodnight is played and some figures are rolled out before the next audience is ushered in. Before MOJO leaves it discovers that…

• The records will be manufactured at Optimal Media in Germany. They are planning on producing something in the region of 35-40,000 boxes.

• Those willing to immerse themselves in the complete mono experience can purchase a specially manufactured Ortofon 2M Mono Special Edition “Beatles Tribute” Cartridge. Although the LPs will sound “just fine” with an existing stereo cartridge.

• George Harrison was once ejected from New York’s Plaza Hotel for playing his McIntosh stereo too loud.

• If a meeting goes on too long at Abbey Road the Beatles track they choose to play to hurry everyone out is Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da.

• The Beatles On Mono is available to pre-order at http://www.thebeatles.com/news/beatles-get-back-mono

Arctic Monkeys cover The Beatles at their biggest ever US gig

Alex Turner

Alex Turner

Arctic Monkeys played their largest headlining US gig of their career to date last night (February 8) at Madison Square Garden in New York.

While they’ve played MSG twice previously in 2012 supporting The Black Keys, this eighth date of their current US tour, which started in Miami, Florida on January 30, was the first time the Sheffield band had topped the bill at the prestigious venue.

Supported by Deerhunter, Alex Turner and co took to the stage just about 9.15pm and played for an hour and a half. With a giant ‘A’ and ‘M’ made out of lights behind them, the four-piece – augmented for most of the evening by touring keyboardist Tom Rowley – began their set with ‘Do I Wanna Know?’, off last year’s ‘AM’. In all, the band played 20 songs, which included all but three of that fifth record’s 12 songs, ‘No. 1 Party Anthem’, ‘I Want It All’ and ‘Mad Sounds’ being the ones they left out.

As he has been for a few of the other gigs on the tour so far, Miles Kane was in attendance, and Turner’s Last Shadow Puppets bandmate joined the band on electric guitar for ‘505’, the last song of the main set. He also walked back onstage with them for the start of the encore for a slow, moody cover of The Beatles’ ‘All My Loving’, played to commemorate, a night early, the 50th anniversary of the Fab Four’s first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show and the legendary group’s first ever US tour.

Only two songs – ‘Dancing Shoes’ and ‘I Bet You Look Good On The Dancefloor’ – were played from their debut album, ‘Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not’, but there was a smattering of tunes from their other records, including ‘Brianstorm’, ‘Fluorescent Adolescent’ , ‘Crying Lightning’ and ‘Don’t Sit Down ‘Cause I’ve Moved Your Chair’, the only song from 2011’s ‘Suck It And See’ to make an appearance. The encore was rounded out with ‘One For The Road’ and ‘R U Mine?’.

Arctic Monkeys played:

‘Do I Wanna Know?’
‘Brianstorm’
‘Don’t Sit Down ‘Cause I’ve Moved Your Chair’
‘Snap Out of It’
‘Crying Lightning’
‘Old Yellow Bricks’
‘Fireside’
‘Knee Socks’
‘Why’d You Only Call Me When You’re High?’
‘Arabella’
‘Dancing Shoes’
‘Pretty Visitors’
‘I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor’
‘Cornerstone’
‘I Wanna Be Yours’
‘Fluorescent Adolescent’
‘505’ (with Miles Kane)
‘All My Loving’ (with Miles Kane)
‘One for the Road’
‘R U Mine?’

John Lennon: “I believe in change”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Hey, there. We’re aware of a bug that’s preventing private tracks from playing in the Stream — sorry about this. While soundcloud work on a fix please read about the Beatle that believed in change while we try to get a hold of the interview files.

The hours-long audio tapes of this interview were acquired by Hard Rock in 1987 and with the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ U.S. debut approaching, the company is releasing the tapes to the public for the first time. The full interview, alongside transcripts, analysis and a memorabilia gallery, are available on Hard Rock’s website, but to give you a sample, we’ve got two exclusive audio clips from the interviews below.

In the first, Lennon discusses how he can affect social change and references the infamous Black Dwarf letter. That letter, written by music critic John Hoyland in 1968 in the radical newspaper Black Dwarf, lambasts Lennon and the recently released track “Revolution” as being hostile to the growing disillusionment of youth toward authoritarian figures.

“I’ve changed a lot of people’s heads,” Lennon says in the clip below. “I believe in change. That’s what Yoko and my scene is, to change it like that…And you’re not preaching to the converted … Well, what are they doing? What can they do? [Referencing the Black Dwarf letter] All I’m saying is I think you should do it by changing people’s heads and they’re saying, ‘Well we should smash the system.’ Now, the system smashing scene’s been going on forever, y’know? What’s it done?”

The second clip finds Lennon discussing the growing weariness of The Beatles toward each other and asking the interviewer if he’d heard of Rolling Stone, which published its first issue only one year before. “I’ve said it all, y’know, somewhere or other,” says Lennon. “It’s just a bit of a hassle to say it…Just read the Rolling Stone article. There’s quite a lot about it in there. Cause I went through it a bit, just about the album and different things. Have you heard of it? It’s a good paper.”

Lennon notes that contrary to other publications, Rolling Stone accepted an ad for Lennon and Yoko Ono’s 1968 album Unfinished Music No. 1: Two Virgins featuring the couple standing naked. “International Times wouldn’t take the front cover photo unless we gave them an indemnity against it, y’know,” says Lennon. “They’re so established… Amazing. But [Rolling Stone] just took it, and this paper…was cooled by it, cause they’ve had the biggest circulation they ever had.”

In a 2009 interview with the Guardian, Hindle recalled traveling to Lennon’s house for the interview. “We students crammed into the back of the Mini and John drove us up the bumpy private road that led to his house, Kenwood,” said Hindle. “In a sitting room at the back of the house we sat down on thick-pile Indian carpets around a low table, cross-legged. Yoko said little, as we all knew this was primarily John’s day – and he said a lot. Apart from a short break, when Yoko fed us macrobiotic bread and jam she had made, Lennon talked continuously for six hours.”

On Sunday, CBS will air The Night That Changed America: A Grammy Salute to The Beatles, an event that took place last month and featured a rare performance from Paul McCartney and Starr (who also played together during the Grammy Awards). The program will also show tributes from Stevie Wonder, Katy Perry, Dave Grohl, Pharrell, Alicia Keys, John Legend, Gary Clark, Jr., Joe Walsh and a reunited Eurythmics.

The Beatles’ momentous trip to America was the subject of a recent Rolling Stone cover story, which details everything from the band’s early trepidation about the trip, the U.S. press’s early criticism of the group (“They look like shaggy Peter Pans,” Time initially wrote) and their generation-defining three-night stint on Sullivan.

The Day John Lennon Died 2010 (full documentary)

John Lennon on Dick Cavett (entire show) September 11, 1971 (HD)

Watch: The Beatles’ last show ever on its 45th anniversary

screen-shot-2014-01-30-at-1-59-31-pm

Forty-five years ago, yesterday, The Beatles played their final show ever.

Back before elaborate album rollouts like worldwide projections or mysterious graffiti, the Liverpool quartet spontaneously previewed songs from their forthcoming album Let It Be to scores of Londoners, staging an impromptu 42-minute set on the rooftop of Apple, their label, on Savile Row.

Before Metropolitan police eventually halted the performance, filmmakers captured not only the memorable set, but also the reactions of its attendees and those in the nearby area. While the January 30th, 1969 event luckily made its way onto the Let It Be documentary, the unannounced rooftop concert ultimately signaled the last time people would see the Beatles perform together live.

Getting The Beatles to play any kind of a show during that time was surprising, considering they officially stopped touring in 1966. This was partially due to the legions of loyal fans drowning out their concerts, as well the obstacle of not being able to perform some of their new material’s more complicated arrangements live. Despite their fatigue with playing traditional gigs, the band wanted to continue premiering and recording new music.

George Harrison explained, “We went on the roof in order to resolve the live concert idea, because it was much simpler than going anywhere else; also nobody had ever done that, so it would be interesting to see what happened when we started playing up there.”

Once the band kicked things off with the rousing “Get Back”, word began to spread through the London streets. Dozens, if not hundreds congregated, crowding neighboring rooftops and balconies as well as stopping traffic and disrupting local businesses. Before the Metropolitan Police could shut down the scene, the band, along with the young keyboardist Billy Preston, got through nine takes of five songs. With George Martin, engineer Glyn Johns and tape operator Alan Parsons recording the takes onto two eight-track tapes in Apple’s basement, these early renditions of ”I’ve Got a Feeling”,”One After 909″, and “Dig a Pony” would end up on the final version of Let It Be.

Though it would be their last show ever, the band sounded as good as it always had. The aforementioned recordings were all rollicking, and despite the cold January day, everyone seemed to be in good spirits. Just as they were about to end their performance, McCartney improvised the lyrics of “Get Back” to poke fun at the situation singing, “You’ve been playing on the roofs again, and you know your Momma doesn’t like it, she’s gonna have you arrested!” The set ended with John Lennon’s famous line, ”I’d like to say thank you on behalf of the group and ourselves, and I hope we passed the audition.” The quote was a fitting send-off to one of music’s most important bands. The group would officially break up in 1970.

Revisit the memorable show below.

Video Setlist:
01. Get Back
02. Don’t Let Me Down
03. I’ve Got A Feeling
04. One After 909
05. Dig A Pony
06. Get Back

Full Setlist:
“Get Back” (three takes)
“Don’t Let Me Down” (two takes)
“I’ve Got a Feeling” (two takes)
“One After 909″ (one take)
“Dig a Pony” (one take)
“I Want You (She’s So Heavy” (Snippet)
“God Save The Queen” (Snippet)
“A Pretty Girl Is A Melody” (Snippet)

20 Best-Selling Vinyl Albums Of The Last 20 Years

20.2013_TheBeatles_Anthology_281013

The Official Charts Company has announced the 20 best selling vinyl albums in the last 20 years, and here they are from 20-1. At number 20 we have the The Beatles’ ‘Anthology 1’ Released in 1995, it was the first instalment of a trilogy set of albums by the Beatles. Comprising a mixture of 60 tracks of live performances and unreleased sounds.

19.2013_DjShadow_Endtroducing_281013

In 1996 the face of hip hop changed with the release of DJ Shadow’s ‘Endtroducing’ . The American studio album was produced under the label Mo’Wax and comes in 19th place. Despite the basic production and the high use of samples, this album is considered to be a landmark album.

17.2013_Oasis_BeHereNow_281013

Described as the second coming of The Beatles, Oasis was at the height of their fame 15 years ago. Released in 1997 ‘Be Here Now’ became Oasis’ third album and had been a highly anticipated album by their fans and critics. Being 17th top seller in vinyl comes as no surprise.

18.2013_Pulp_DifferentClass_281013

Pulp were seen to be pioneers in the Britpop movement and in 1995 ‘Different Class’ propelled the group to fame. The 5th studio album bought two singles: ‘Common People’ and Disco 2000’ both being in the top 10 in UK charts.

16.2013_NeilYoung_Harevest_281013

Canadian musician Neil Young’s ‘Harvest’ was the best selling album in the US in 1972. Doing something different within the rock genre he used London Symphony Orchestra, which helped him top the Billboard 200 album chart for two weeks.

15.2013_Prodigy_MusicForTheJiltedGeneration_281013

In 15th place Prodigy released ‘Music for the Jilted Generation’ in 1994. Focusing on electronic dance music the group remastered this album in 2008 including bonus tracks.

14.2013_Nirvana_UnpluggedinNewYork_281013

Nirvana recorded live album ‘MTV Unplugged In New York’. This was the first album released by the band since Kurt Cobain passed. This album is 14th in the countdown to number 1. It won a Grammy for Best Alternative Music album in 1996.

13.2013_Blur_Parklife_281013

Blur’s Parklife was the album that bought the band back to the forefront of the Britpop movement in 1994. Certified four times platinum in the UK, Blur fought off competition from Oasis with hit singles like: ‘Girls and Boys’ and ‘To The End’. Frontman Damon Albarn said Parklife was “the travels of the mystical lager-eater, seeing what’s going on in the world and commenting on it.”

12.2013_StroneRoses_SecondComing_281013

‘Second Coming’ was the second studio album by the Stone Roses. It took the band 2 years to record the album, released in 1994. At number 12 the band sold 1 million copies. The album has an unusual track listing with 99 tracks, 77 of which are silent after the song ‘Love spreads’.

11.2013_PaulWeller_StanleyRoad_281013

The third studio album by Paul Weller: ‘Stanley Road’ is at number 11. The album took its name from a road where he grew up in Woking. Paul told the BBC he hopes he can one day create an album as perfect as this one.

10.2013_Prodigy_TheFatOfTheLand_28101310.

As of 2012 the Prodigy’s ‘Fat Of The Land’ has sold 10 million copies worldwide despite being released in 1997. Drawing inspiration from the old English phrase, the band will definitely be living well. The album comes in the countdown at number 10.

9.2013_Queen_MadeInHeaven_281013

‘Made In Heaven’ released by Queen in 1995 was the 15th and last album that featured the late Freddie Mercury. The album debut at number one in the UK and went four times platinum, selling 20 million copies worldwide.

8.2013_MassiveAttack_ProtectionNoProtection_281013

Massive Attack’s Protection/No Protection is the second album remixed by British producer Mad Professor. This album bought a fusion of different sounds and genres together.

7.2013_Beatles_Liveatthebbc_281013

‘Beatles Live At The BBC’ is rated 7th highest selling vinyl. Made in 1994 it is an album dedicated to performances by the Beatles which were originally broadcast by the BBC in 1963 to 1965.

6.2013_Leftfield_Leftism_281013

Leftfield’s Leftism is the first album by electronica musicians Paul Daley and Neil Barnes. Released in 1995 by Columbia Records the album features reworked songs and some new original pieces.

5.2013_Radiohead_KingOfLimbs_281013

The King of Limbs by Radiohead was a self-released album in 2011. With it being their 8th studio album the band let little information out before its release. The album was originally released as an MP3 download followed by a CD. It’s 5th in the best-sellers list.

4.2013_TRAVIS_TheInvisibleBand_281013

The Scottish indie pop band Travis released ‘The Invisible Band’ in 2001. The name of the album refers to the band having famous and influential songs but not being regarded famous themselves.

3.2013_Portishead_dummy_281013

‘Dummy’ is Portishead’s debut album. Based in Bristol the group made the album in 1994 and later won the Mercury music prize in 1995.

2.2013_OASIS_DefinitetlyMaybe_281013

With ‘Definitely Maybe’, Oasis went straight to number one in 1994 in the UK, gaining positive commercial and critical success. Oasis helped revitalise the Britpop genre along with other groups like Blur.

1.2013_OASIS_WHATS_THESTORYMORNINGGLORY_281013

What’s The Morning Story Glory’ by Oasis is the number one selling vinyl in the last 20 years. Released in 1995 won the award for the Best British album in the last 30 years at the 2010 Brit Awards.

“99 Revolutions” live video from Italy as part of ONE’s ‘iconic protest songs’

Jun. 12, 2013

Green Day have been included in a new collection of protest songs in Bono’s ONE campaign, in a new initiative called agit8. The list is being launched with some 50 songs including music from Elvis Costello, Mumford & Sons, Tom Waits, and The Beatles.

The goal of the list is to help influence politicians attending the G8 summit to help end poverty. Some of the artists involved are covering songs or releasing special versions. As for Green Day’s involvement, the band has now released this special live version of 99 Revolutions from Bologna, Italy.