Video: Phoenix – Lizstomania / One time too many – A Take Away Show

Photographs by Vincent Moon – Copyright

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La Blogotheque
Phoenix – Lizstomania / One time too many – A Take Away Show from La Blogotheque

“It’s a weird game going on between the band and the place where they play. A mesmerizing Eiffel Tower or Trocadero usually steal the show with their size and more or less spectacular tricks, but here’s a band no one would expect to find there, competing with all those crowd-pullers. ”

Produced by Chryde for la Blogotheque
Filmed by Vincent Moon
Sounds by François Clos and Guillaume de la Villeon
Edit by Guillaume Guerry
Mix by Francois Clos
HD

9 OCTOBER 2009
TROCADERO, EIFFEL TOWER, PARIS

Sources: La Blogotheque, Vimeo
Special thanks to Phoenix and Vincent Moon.

Take Away Show #41 — THE ARCADE FIRE

Members of Arcade Fire at the 2011 Grammy Awards.

The creation of Take Away Shows is linked to Arcade Fire. Before the cancellation of their European Tour, Arcade Fire played two amazing video sessions in Paris: one in a lift, and, after, into the crowd.

From Vincent Moon / Petites Planètes
Paris, L’Olympia, March 2007

Take Away Show #41 _ THE ARCADE FIRE

Text by Chryde
Images & edit by vincent moon
Sounds by adrien cordier & chryde
Mix by francois clos
Produced by chryde for la blogotheque

blogotheque.net/Arcade-Fire,2868

Win Butler had to slouch a little to fit into the freight elevator. He went directly to the back, leaned against the iron door, turned around, looked at the cramped space, and asked us, “Think we can all go back now?” Then he smiled a smile that a kid would give, pure and honest, like he had just found his hiding place. Win Butler smiled, and five weeks of work seemed to crumble before us.

During those weeks, I had been in continual contact with Vincent Morisset, who runs the Neon Bible site. Win and Régine had been responsible for coordinating our Take Away Show. We had discussed dates and places, imagining the Madeleine at night, the knoll at the Île de la Cité, an old café, a roundabout behind the Olympia…We checked the weather every day and despaired about the cold front that was passing through Paris. We had surveyed the entire inhumane neighborhood from top to bottom, trying to anticipate the crowd, the willpower of the group, the cold, and the fatigue. Then, suddenly, we had a plan. Win asked if there was a freight elevator. We found it, Win smiled, and the Take Away Show was no longer in our hands.

We knew that the Take Away Show with Arcade Fire wouldn’t be like the others. The project was made for them because they’re of a different kind, a different essence. We had spent the afternoon with them when suddenly we realized, in a flash: “yes, this group is different.”

We had been playing the role of “outsider” the entire day, like a foreign body that latches onto the daily grind of these magnificent musicians. We had to adapt, through astonishment and wonder, as the band took up their instruments and started to play. But Arcade Fire didn’t take us as outsiders. It all seemed to unfold naturally: we entered into their logic as they awaited us and eventually swallowed us up. It was now Win Butler’s Take Away Show, and we followed.

It was too cold to play outside after the show, so we initially thought about playing in the entrance hall during Electrelane’s performance, but the Olympia didn’t allow it. All we had left was the freight elevator, and we had to do a little convincing to make it happen. On the other side of the elevator, there was a door that would lead us into the concert hall. They could go back to the pit in the Olympia by exiting through there, and then re-exit through the door near the stage. Win wasn’t so hot on the plan…the venue was a little too big and the whole thing sounded complicated. It took us about 20 minutes to convince him, not knowing at all what was waiting for us at the other end of this crazy idea. Win went back to tell Richard and Will to follow him to the elevator, with everyone asking when to play, or whether this was going to happen before or after the show. It was going to be before. Régine was the only one who thought differently, and there were a few seconds of furious looks, which immediately mellowed and eased into resolution. The big guy won, and everyone went back to reconfigure the set-list.

Arcade Fire is a unique group. Everyone’s split up during the day, managing and wandering through his/her own affairs in the dressing rooms and corridors. No one seems to move about as much as Win, who manages everything, knows everything, watches everything, and hears everything. Afterwards, as show time approaches, everyone slowly comes together again, each still folded into him/herself. A couple of notes sound from a bugle, Régina taps on a box, Jérémy amuses himself with a drum, and Tim does a little Monty Python dance. A mobile cacophony, a music that takes form, several people coming together, and some random and various snippets of songs to come. Everyone is concentrating alone, but at the same time following a trace towards the group’s uncanny unity. As the orchestra tuned and grew powerfully aligned, we started towards the elevator.

The rest waits on film. We all bunched into the elevator, and I took my position at Richard’s feet. They started off with an enchanting version of “Neon Bible” and the door opened, allowing us to approach and penetrate the massive torrent of fans. I didn’t think about anything more. I was taken by the fervor, watching Vincent Moon with his camera, screaming in silence, and thinking over and over again: “We did it. Shit, we really did it!”

Bear in Heaven: ‘I Love You, it’s Cool’ Review

Bear in Heaven band

The Brooklyn band’s third album grabs the listener from its first play.

If you’ve got a spare four months you might like to listen to the stream of I Love You, It’s Cool which Brooklyn’s Bear in Heaven have slowed down by 400,000%. The as-good-as interminable 2,700 hours of pure drone is a neat skit, and it allows reviewers to make the know-it-all point that, actually, you need to give this band time. Aren’t we writers just so perceptive?

Time isn’t necessarily what you need to give this album at all, though. The Reflection of You is an immediate winner that grabs you by the lapels and pulls you right in close. It’s a synth-driven pure pop gem that requires next to no time to take hold.

Sinful Nature is another effort that’s deliciously hooky from the first taste, and while Bear in Heaven’s card might’ve been marked as psychedelic prior to this third LP’s release, there are no outré elements purely for the sake of it, and nothing is ever overblown.

Almost everything is tight and controlled, returning time and again to the simple power of a pop song. Frontman Jon Philpot seems in thrall to John Travolta on The Reflection of You when he winks, “If you come dance with me / I think you will like my moves.” Elsewhere, with his big mouth and strut strapped on, he very nearly channels Ian Brown on the stomping Space Remains.

But if there’s a criticism to direct this trio’s way, it’s that they perhaps could get lost in the moment a bit more, as when they do it’s glorious. Three-minutes-fifty into World of Freakout and then again during Sinful Nature they stretch the song at hand further than it should go, upping the ante, volume and intensity into elongated crescendos that Hot Chip would be proud of. And maintaining these directions even longer wouldn’t have seemed self-indulgent – they could swell to mountainous proportions and please any listener.

The qualities that may have led to comment that this album needs time to sink in are found during slower, moodier moments: lugubrious grooves like Warm Water and Noon Moon, each a thoughtful slice of modern electronica. Longevity might ultimately be an issue, but if we’re living in the moment – as the superb title of this record seems to suggest we do – then who cares? Just dance.

Bear in Heaven – “Reflection of You” (Official Video by John Lee of PFFR)

Tracks

1 Idle Heart
2 The Reflection of You
3 Noon Moon
4 Sinful Nature
5 Cool Light
6 Kiss Me Crazy
7 World of Freakout
8 Warm Water
9 Space Remains
10 Sweetness & Sickness

About the band:

Bear in Heaven is a Brooklyn-based rock band formed by Jon Philpot. The sound of the band incorporates influences from psychedelic music, electronic music, and krautrock.

Jon Philpot has previously released music as part of the duo Presocratics, in collaboration with guitarist and composer Need Thomas Windham. Presocratics released two albums on the record label Table of the Elements in 2001; both were produced by Philpot.

The first Bear in Heaven release (Tunes Nextdoor to Songs, Eastern Developments 2003) was an EP of solo recordings by Philpot, with guest musicians performing on various instruments. Shortly after the release of Tunes Nextdoor to Songs, Philpot joined with guitarist Adam Wills, keyboardist/guitarist Sadek Bazarra (a graphic designer with Brooklyn design collective GH avisualagency), guitarist David Daniell (of San Agustin), and bassist James Elliott (Ateleia, School of Seven Bells). Eventually drummer Joe Stickney (formerly of Perpetual Groove, drummer with Paul Duncan, Rhys Chatham’s Essentialist project, and current touring drummer with Panthers) was added to the lineup. Daniell left Bear in Heaven in 2005 to focus on his solo project.

In 2006 they did a Take-Away Show video session shot by Vincent Moon.

Red Bloom of the Boom, Bear in Heaven’s first full-length album with the full band, was released in 2007 by the Hometapes record label.

Elliott left the band after the completion of the recordings of Red Bloom of the Boom to focus on School of Seven Bells and his solo project, Ateleia. Bear in Heaven now performs as a four-piece with Philpot on vocals, guitar and keyboards; Wills on guitar and bass; Bazarra on bass and keyboards; and Stickney on drums.

Their 2010 album, Beast Rest Forth Mouth, received the “Best New Music” award from Pitchfork Media, with the reviewer stating: “Beast Rest Forth Mouth is as familiar-feeling as it is difficult to pinpoint. Mostly made up of textural, spacious three- to four-minute pop anthems with towering choruses, BRFM is a welcome reminder that an album doesn’t have to be bombastic to feel huge and important. Take out the earbuds and let it fill a space: This is music that’s bigger than your iPod—music you’ll want to feel all around you. Though not quite coming out of nowhere, BRFM seems like a surprise gift—a striking consolidation of the spiky psych-prog tendencies of their debut into a pop framework.”

Their most recent album I Love You, It’s Cool was previewed to fans on the band’s website in March 2012 – capturing the album and slowing it down to 2,700 hours of drone. It has so far received positive reviews and was previewed by the website NPR. The album was released on April 3rd.

Discography

Tunes Nextdoor to Songs – Eastern Developments CDEP, 2003
Red Bloom of the Boom – Hometapes CD, 2007
Beast Rest Forth Mouth – Hometapes CD, 2009
Beast Rest Forth Mouth UK release – Hometapes/Dreamboat Records CD, 2010[5]
I Love You, It’s Cool – Hometapes CD, 2012

Beirut, New York child prodigy


Beirut is an American band which was originally the solo musical project of Santa Fe native Zachary Francis Condon, and later expanded into a band. The band’s first performances were in New York, in May 2006, to support the release of their debut album, Gulag Orkestar. Beirut’s music combines elements of indie-rock and world music.

Zach Condon was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico on February 13, 1986. He grew up partly in Newport News, Virginia and partly in Santa Fe. Condon played trumpet in a jazz band as a teenager and cites jazz as a major influence.

Condon attended Santa Fe High School, where he was a student until he dropped out at the age of 17. According to a 2011 interview with David Dye on NPR, growing up in Santa Fe meant that Condon was exposed to Mexican music such as mariachi. He also worked at a cinema showing international films and this piqued his interest in Fellini arias and Sicilian funeral brass as well as providing his first experience of Balkan music, including perhaps that of Goran Bregović and Boban Marković.

He later enrolled in community college, but only attended for a short period before traveling to Europe at the age of 17 with his older brother, Ryan. This discovery and Condon’s subsequent exploration of world music proved to be instrumental in the development of Beirut’s melodic sound. Zach’s musical legacy has also stemmed to his younger brother Ross Condon, who plays in the Brooklyn based band Total Slacker.

On his return from Europe, Condon enrolled at the University of New Mexico, where he studied Portuguese and photography. Condon recorded the bulk of the material used for Gulag Orkestar by himself in his bedroom, going into the studio to finish the album with the assistance of Jeremy Barnes (Neutral Milk Hotel, A Hawk and a Hacksaw) and Heather Trost (A Hawk and a Hacksaw), who became early members of the band Beirut.

On the strength of the recordings, Condon was signed under the name of Beirut to Ba Da Bing! records, and Gulag Orkestar was given a May 2006 release. Condon recruited some friends to play the music live for the first shows in New York, and Beirut was born.

Beirut’s first official music video was for the song “Elephant Gun”. The second video, which was for the song “Postcards from Italy”, was directed by Alma Har’el, and was released later. 2007 saw the first release of the full band with the Lon Gisland EP.

Beirut’s second album, The Flying Club Cup, was recorded largely at a makeshift studio in Albuquerque and completed at Arcade Fire’s studio in Quebec. The music on the album has a French influence due to Condon’s interest in French chanson during its recording. Condon has cited Francophone singers Jacques Brel, Serge Gainsbourg and Yves Montand as influences. He also expressed interest in French film and culture, claiming this was his original reason for travelling to Europe. The Flying Club Cup was officially released in October 2007. In September 2007 they did a Take-Away Show acoustic video session shot by Vincent Moon. A DVD, Cheap Magic Inside, was shot but quickly sold out; in December 2010, Beirut, BaDaBing, and Blogotheque authorized its dissemination via digital download.

On April 3, 2008, Beirut canceled a previously announced summer European tour. The band had already been touring and had completed the U.S. leg of the tour, but before the European leg, Condon stated that after two months of touring, he was suffering from exhaustion. Zach Condon explained the cancellations in a post on the official Beirut website, stating that he wanted to put the effort into ensuring that any shows would be “as good as humanly possible”. In January 2009 the double EP March of the Zapotec/Holland EP was released, containing an official Beirut release based on Condon’s recent trip to Oaxaca (March of the Zapotec), and electronic music under the “Realpeople” name (Holland). On February 6, 2009 Beirut made their debut television performance in the United States on the Late Show with David Letterman, performing “A Sunday Smile”.

In early June 2011, amidst touring the US, Beirut announced that their newest album, The Rip Tide, which had been recorded the previous winter in upstate New York, was to be released on August 30. The band simultaneously released a single from the album, “East Harlem” (which was first recorded on Live at the Music Hall of Williamsburg ), with the B-side “Goshen”. The new album is recorded, managed, and released under Condon’s own Pompeii Records. Reviewers and fellow musicians have noted that, unlike the prior albums which drew heavily on foreign music from Mexico, France, the Balkans, etc., this one has shown Beirut with its own, more pop-oriented sound; saying, “what emerges [on The Rip Tide] is a style that belongs uniquely and distinctly to Beirut, one that has actually been there all along.” One reviewer noted that “the Euro influences [of Beirut’s previous albums] are still there, but the presiding spirit is old-fashioned American pop.” This album also differs from Beirut’s previous albums in that the music was recorded as a band playing together rather than laying down individual tracks one at a time, though the lyrics were only added by Condon after all the music had been recorded.

Albums

Gulag Orkestar (May 9, 2006)
The Flying Club Cup (October 9, 2007) UK #69
The Rip Tide (August 2, 2011) UK #49, CAN #48 US #80

EPs

The Guns of Brixton / Interior of a Dutch House (November 13, 2006) – Calexico/Beirut 7″ split single
Lon Gisland (January 30, 2007)
Pompeii EP (February 28, 2007)
Elephant Gun EP (June 25, 2007)
March of the Zapotec/Holland EP (February 16, 2009 – Unofficially released onto iTunes on January 27) US #87 UK #101

Compilations

Dark Was the Night Beirut contributed the song Mimizan to the charity compilation benefiting the Red Hot Organization

Again in 2011, they contributed a cover of Caetano Veloso’s song, “O Leãozinho,” to the Red Hot Organization’s most recent charitable album “Red Hot+Rio 2.” The album is a follow-up to the 1996 “Red Hot+Rio.” Proceeds from the sales will be donated to raise awareness and money to fight AIDS/HIV and related health and social issues.
DVDs

Cheap Magic Inside (2007)
Beirut: Live at the Music Hall of Williamsburg, Brooklyn, NYC (2009)

Source: Wikipedia

Vincent Moon – Health, Live Video

HEALTH _ a live film (paris, 2009)
by Vincent Moon / Petites Planètes Plus 2 years ago

HEALTH, LIVE
12minutes
shot in Paris, october 2009
one camera, 40min show, edit of 4 songs
watch in the dark, listen carefully with headphones

filmed and edited by vincent moon
sounds by francois clos
produced by la blogotheque

“Hi, we’re HEALTH. We’re from Los Angeles.”

OK, I’m pretty sure that BJ did say that. Or Jake. But then…I have no idea. Beneath the mess of mutated sounds and the heinous volume that is HEALTH, it’s pretty damn hard to hear a single thing the guy is singing. Which is fine. No one came to the Nouveau Casino expecting to hear Facebook status-quality poetry. Nobody was expecting words of wisdom. People see HEALTH for the experience, the attack on the senses that leaves you just a bit disoriented. Before they go on I meet up with a friend from Los Angeles, a huge fan of HEALTH since the get-go. For weeks he has been going on about the band’s bassist, John Famiglietti. Supposedly the guy makes weird sounds on his bass, but I never really got any more specifics than that. These conversations usually end in my friend dancing on the sidewalk or making sounds that I am confident no one can ever reproduce.

At the show there’s almost a mosh pit. There’s a lot of teenagers not really grooving. There is a guy dressed as a clown. And there is my friend from LA, six foot fourteen. Completely freaking out. The bass, the bass he’s pointing and waving, the bass ! Dean Moriarty come to life. And I cock my ear, searching. And there it is.

The moment that seals the deal comes at the end of “Tabloid Sores,” when all of the band’s energy, the steamroller churning and remarkably tight pummeling of snares, the waves of guitar like bits of glass all come to a screeching halt, leaving only a bass loop that sounds like an animal, an android, Abraham Lincoln. Anything but a bass. And that’s when I start going crazy too.

text by Max