Black Keys Plan Massive North American Tour This Fall

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Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys performs in Quebec City, Canada. Photo: Scott Legato/Getty Images

Band will be joined by Cage the Elephant, Jake Bugg and St. Vincent at various points during the trek.

The Black Keys will spend this fall hoofing it across North America on a massive tour behind their new record Turn Blue. After a headlining slot at Hangout Fest in Gulf Shores, Alabama and a stretch of dates in Europe, the band will kick off their North American tour at the Schottenstein Center in Columbus, Ohio on September 5th and wrap things up at the Sprint Center in Kansas City, MO on December 21st.

The band has also tapped various openers for the multi-leg trek: Cage the Elephant will join the group between September 5th and the 27th, up-and-coming UK rocker Jake Bugg will open shows from October 24th to November 16th and St. Vincent will take over from December 4th to the 21st.

You can check out a full list of dates below, as well as a silly tour announcement video in which a disgraced Dan Auerbach tries to make amends but receives only laughter and cheers, while the mere site of Patrick Carney elicits a swarm of boos.

 

 

 

The Black Keys’ video game has been on point, per usual, during the lead up to Turn Blue. After teasing the record with clips featuring a wackadoo hypnotist, the band went to church in the new video for “Fever,” with Auerbach preaching the gospel as a sweat-drenched televangelist.

Turn Blue, which follows up the Black Keys’ 2011 LP El Camino, sees official release on May 13th, but you can stream the album in its entirety now.

9/5 Columbus, OH – Schottenstein Cente
9/6 Cleveland, OH – Quicken Loans Arena
9/7 Grand Rapids, MI – Van Andel Arena
9/9 Milwaukee, WI – BMO Harris Bradley Center
9/10 Louisville, KY – KFC Yum! Center
9/12 Detroit, MI – Joe Louis Arena
9/13 Pittsburgh, PA – CONSOL Energy Center
9/14 Rochester, NY – Blue Cross Arena
9/16 Toronto, Ontario – Air Canada Centre
9/18 Montreal, Quebec – Bell Centre
9/20 Philadelphia, PA – Wells Fargo Center
9/21 Boston, MA – TD Garden
9/24 Brooklyn, NY – Barclays Center
9/25 Washington, DC – Verizon Center
9/27 Chicago, IL – United Center
10/24 Minneapolis, MN – Target Center
10/25 Winnipeg, Manitoba – MTS Centre
10/27 Calgary, Alberta – Scotiabank Saddledome
10/28 Edmonton, Alberta – Rexall Place
10/30 Vancouver, British Columbia – Pacific Coliseum
10/31 Portland, OR – Moda Centers
11/1 Seattle, WA – KeyArena
11/9 San Diego, CA – Viejas Arena at Aztec Bowl
11/10 Phoenix, AZ – US Airways Center
11/12 Salt Lake City, UT – Maverik Center
11/13 Denver, CO – Pepsi Center
11/15 Houston, TX – Toyota Center
11/16 Dallas,TX – American Airlines Center
12/4 Baltimore, MD – Baltimore Arena
12/5 Raleigh, NC – PNC Arena
12/6 Richmond, VA – Richmond Coliseum
12/8 Nashville, TN – Bridgestone Arena
12/9 St. Louis, MO – Scottrade Center
12/11 Atlanta, GA – Philips Arena
12/12 Charlotte, NC – Time Warner Cable Arena
12/13 Greenville, SC – Bon Secours Wellness Arena
12/15 Ft. Lauderdale, FL – BB&T Center
12/16 Tampa, FL – Tampa Bay Times Forum
12/17 Orlando, FL – Amway Center
12/19 Austin, TX – Frank Erwin Center
12/20 Tulsa, OK – BOK Center
12/21 Kansas City, MO – Sprint Center

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 2014 Induction Ceremony at Barclays Center

 

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Nirvana Reunite, Kiss Remain Civil at Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Evening wraps with Lorde, Kim Gordon, St. Vincent and Joan Jett all fronting Nirvana

Prior to the performance, Nirvana was introduced by R.E.M. frontman Michael Stipe, was was a close friend of frontman Kurt Cobain. “This is not just pop music, he said of the band. This is something much greater than that.” He continued, “Nirvana were artists in every sense of the word. Nirvana tapped into a voice that was yearning to be heard. Nirvana were kicking against the mainstream. They spoke truth and a lot of people listened.”

Grohl gave the first and longest of the acceptance speeches, using it to commemorate the four other drummers who played in the band, while also recognizing the D.C. punk band that inspired him as a musician. “For whatever reason, I got to be the luckiest person in the world,” he said.

Novoselic took time to remember Cobain.”I wish Kurt could be here,” he said. “His music meant so much to so many people.” He also thanked Sub Pop Records, the Melvins’ Buzz Osborne, and Steve Albini, among others.

Kurt Cobain’s mother spoke on her son’s behalf. “He would be so proud, he said he wouldn’t, but he would be,” she said.

Courtney Love provided the final remarks, saying, “I have a big speech but I’m not going to say it. I just wish Kurt could have been here.” She kept things civil, even giving a hug to Grohl.

Watch the full speech below.

 

 

It was exactly midnight when Joan Jett walked onstage with the surviving members of Nirvana and tore into the opening chords of “Smells Like Teen Spirit.” By that point, the capacity crowd at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center had witnessed a long evening full of miraculous moments only possible at the annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony: A beaming Peter Criss threw his arms around his supposed sworn enemy Paul Stanley during Kiss’ peaceful reunion, Cat Stevens led an arena full of Kiss and Nirvana fans through a sing-along rendition of “Peace Train,” Courtney Love embraced Dave Grohl in a huge bear hug after 20 years of nasty accusations and lawsuits and Bruce Springsteen played with two founding members of the E Street Band for the first time in 40 years.

But nothing could compare to the thrill of watching Joan Jett, Kim Gordon, St. Vincent and Lorde take turns fronting Nirvana. Dave Grohl, Pat Smear and Krist Novoselic hadn’t played a Kurt Cobain-penned song together in public since the frontman killed himself 20 years ago, and it’s quite easy to imagine they never will again. Jett kicked things off with a wild, thrashed-out “Smells Like Teen Spirit” that had men in tuxedos dancing on their chairs. Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon kept the energy high with a faithful rendition of “Aneurysm” and Annie Clark (St. Vincent) belted out “Lithium.” It wrapped up with Lorde’s gut-wrenching take on “All Apologies.” She was born two and a half years after Cobain died, but she somehow had the wisdom and confidence to deliver those agonizing lyrics.

The evening began a little after 7:00 PM with a speech by Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Chairman Jann Wenner. “We are thrilled to be here tonight in Brooklyn,” he said. “As Keith Richards has said so often, at this age we’re thrilled to be anywhere. We’re here to celebrate our youth, our music and that which keeps us forever young. Rock and roll offers hope and passion and joy and courage and love, a way to understand the world around us, and for so many of us, a way of life.”

Peter Asher handed out the first two awards of the night to Beatles manager Brian Epstein and Rolling Stones manager/producer Andrew Loog Oldham. “These are the first two managers ever inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame,” he said. “Each of them managed one of the most important ensembles in music history, let alone just rock and roll. And each of whom guided his band from anonymity to global stature, though in very different ways.” Epstein died in 1967 and Loog Oldham opted to skip the ceremony, so nobody was on hand to accept their awards.

Next up was Peter Gabriel, who delivered a hypnotic rendition of “Digging In The Dirt” before Chris Martin walked out to induct him. “He brings together sounds from all over the world,” said the Coldplay frontman. “At times it feels like he releases music at a snail’s pace. But one looks back now and sees this amazing cathedral of song. It was worth the effort and the time that it took. He’s always been an innovator and a seeker. He’s a curator and an inspirer. He also helped John Cusack get his girlfriend back in the movie Say Anything.

A very grateful Gabriel hoisted the award above his head Cusack-style before his acceptance speech. “Watch out for music,” he said. “It should come with a health warning. It can be dangerous. It can make you feel so alive, so connected to the people around you, connected to what you are inside. It can make you think that the world should and could be a much better place. It can also make you very, very happy.” He then sat at the piano and duetted with Martin on the 1992 obscurity “Washing of the Water” before bringing out surprise guest Youssou N’Dour for a long, euphoric “In Your Eyes” that brought everyone to their feet.

The vast majority of press leading up to the Hall of Fame centered around the never-ending drama of Kiss, so it was a little surprising to see their big moment come and go so early in the evening, though it did make sense because they were the only inductees in the house that decided not to perform. Longtime Kiss superfan Tom Morello gave a fiery induction speech for his heroes. “Kiss was never a critics’ band,” he said. “Kiss was a people’s band…The first Kiss concert I saw was the single loudest, most cathartic two hours of music I’ve seen to this day.”

Ace Frehley, Peter Criss, Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley walked onstage together to thunderous applause, and each of them looked a little choked up by the moment. Simmons spoke first, and, against all odds, was the most concise. “We are humbled to stand on this stage and do what we love doing,” he said. “This is a profound moment for all of us. I’m here to say a few kind words about the four knuckleheads who, 40 years ago, got together and decided to put together the kind of band we never saw onstage, critics be damned.”

After speaking kindly about his two former bandmates, he yielded the microphone to them. Peter Criss thanked everybody from the group’s former managers to their truck drivers, while Frehley rambled a bit since he had trouble reading his own notes without his proper glasses. “I was 13 when I picked up my first guitar,” he said. “I always sensed I was going to be into something big. A few years later, there I was. I experienced the Summer of Love.”

Stanley has been the most vocal critic of the Hall of Fame in the long buildup to this ceremony, and he used the opportunity to take some parting shots. “The people are speaking to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame,” he said. “They want more. They deserve more. They want to be part of the induction. They want to be a part of the nomination [process]. They don’t want to be spoon-fed a bunch of choices. The people pay for tickets. The people buy albums. The people who nominate do not.”

Any hopes of a surprise Kiss performance were dashed when they walked offstage and Art Garfunkel stepped out to induct Cat Stevens, who now goes by the name Yusuf Islam. “If Paul and I hadn’t split up around 1970 there’d be no room on the charts for Cat Stevens to take over,” he said. “‘Bridge Over Troubled Water had to go away so that Tea for the Tillerman could arrive.”

Cat Stevens gave a long speech where he name-checked everybody from Bach to Bo Diddley to Leonard Bernstein and Bob Dylan, even pausing in the middle to ask for a glass of water. He won the crowd right back when he picked up an acoustic guitar and delivered a flawless “Father and Son.” He’s 65 years old, but since he’s taken decades off from touring and lived a very healthy lifestyle, he sounded absolutely amazing. Paul Shaffer and his band then came out for “Wild World” and a rousing “Peace Train” where they got some help from a large choir. It served as a nice preview for the American tour that Yusuf is supposedly plotting for sometime in the near future.

Matt Taibbi Quits Rolling Stone to Join Omidyar’s First Look Media

Matt Taibbi

Matt Taibbi

Photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

Rolling Stone’s loss is Pierre Omidyar’s gain. Matt Taibbi is joining First Look Media, the same organization where Glenn Greenwald, Jeremy Scahill, and Laura Poitras are on the masthead at The Intercept– but Taibbi will lead his own publication focused on financial and political corruption. The new magazine does not yet have a name or a precise launch date.

Matt Taibbi, who made a name as a fierce critic of Wall Street at Rolling Stone magazine, has joined First Look Media, the latest big-name journalist to leave an established brand to enter the thriving and well-financed world of news start-ups, wrote Ravi Somaiya.

Mr. Taibbi will start his own publication focusing on financial and political corruption, he said in an interview on Wednesday. First Look is financed by the eBay founder Pierre Omidyar, who is worth $8.5 billion, according to Forbes. Mr. Omidyar has pledged $250 million to the project.

Read Matt’s thank you note to Rolling Stone Magazine:

Thank You, Rolling Stone

By Matt Taibbi
POSTED: February 20, 10:35 AM ET

Today is my last day at Rolling Stone. As of this week, I’m leaving to work for First Look Media, the new organization that’s already home to reporters like Glenn Greenwald, Jeremy Scahill and Laura Poitras.

I’ll have plenty of time to talk about the new job elsewhere. But in this space, I just want to talk about Rolling Stone, and express my thanks. Today is a very bittersweet day for me. As excited as I am about the new opportunity, I’m sad to be leaving this company.

More than 15 years ago, Rolling Stone sent a reporter, Brian Preston, to do a story on the eXile, the biweekly English-language newspaper I was editing in Moscow at the time with Mark Ames. We abused the polite Canadian Preston terribly – I think we thought we were being hospitable – and he promptly went home and wrote a story about us that was painful, funny and somewhat embarrassingly accurate. Looking back at that story now, in fact, I’m surprised that Rolling Stone managing editor Will Dana gave me a call years later, after I’d returned to the States.

I remember when Will called, because it was such an important moment in my life. I was on the American side of Niagara Falls, walking with friends, when my cell phone rang. Night had just fallen and when Will invited me to write a few things in advance of the 2004 presidential election, I nearly walked into the river just above the Falls.

At the time, I was having a hard time re-acclimating to life in America and was a mess personally. I was broke and having anxiety attacks. I specifically remember buying three cans of corned beef hash with the last dollars of available credit on my last credit card somewhere during that period. Anyway I botched several early assignments for the magazine, but Will was patient and eventually brought me on to write on a regular basis.

It was my first real job and it changed my life. Had Rolling Stone not given me a chance that year, God knows where I’d be – one of the ideas I was considering most seriously at the time was going to Ukraine to enroll in medical school, of all things.

In the years that followed, both Will and editor/publisher Jann S. Wenner were incredibly encouraging and taught me most of what I now know about this business. It’s been an amazing experience. I’ve had a front-row seat for some of the strangest and most interesting episodes of our recent history. At various times, thanks to this magazine, I’ve spent days hiding in a cell at the infamous Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, gone undercover in an apocalyptic church in Texas (where I learned to vomit my demons into a paper bag), and even helped run a campaign office for George W. Bush along the I-4 corridor in Florida, getting so into the assignment that I was involuntarily happy when Bush won.

I was at the Michael Jackson trial, so close to the defendant I could see the outlines of his original nose. I met past and future presidents. I shared Udon noodles with Dennis Kucinich in a van on a highway in Maine. And I paddled down the streets of Katrina-ravaged New Orleans, so deep into the disaster zone that a soldier in a rescue copter above mistook me for a victim and threw a Meal Ready to Eat off my head. I still have that MRE, it has some kind of pop tart in it – I’m going to give it to my son someday.

To be able to say you work for Rolling Stone, it’s a feeling any journalist in his right mind should want to experience. The magazine’s very name is like a magic word. I noticed it from the very first assignment. Even people who know they probably shouldn’t talk to you, do, once they hear you’re from the magazine Dr. Hook sang about. And if they actually see the business card, forget it. People will do anything to get into the magazine, to have some of that iconic cool rub off on them.

There were times when I would think about the great reporters and writers who’ve had the same job I was so lucky to have, and it would be almost overwhelming – it was like being the Dread Pirate Roberts. It was a true honor and I’ll eternally be in the debt of Will and Jann, and Sean Woods and Coco McPherson and Victor Juhasz and Alison Weinflash and so many others with whom it was my privilege to work. I wish there was something I could say that is stronger than Thank You.

No journalist has ever been luckier than me. Thank you, Rolling Stone.

—–
We’ll miss you Matt!

Fall 2013 Preview: MGMT’s new album ‘MGMT’ among the 26 Albums You Need to Hear

Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser of MGMT in the studio. Photo: Danny Clinch

Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser of MGMT in the studio.
Photo: Danny Clinch

MGMT’s Long Strange Trip: Inside Their Most Experimental Album Yet

How the psychedelic duo almost lost their minds

MGMT have released a new trailer for their self-titled third LP, out September 17th on Columbia, that features snippets of five new tracks, an NSA wire tap and one angry possum in a bathroom. Frontman Andrew VanWyngarden encounters the beast while brushing his teeth, kicking off a peculiar day that later finds his cohort, Benjamin Goldwasser, knifing open a speaker cabinet and discovering a suspicious looking beetle that seems to be spying on them. The bug (get it?) doesn’t belong to the snooping NSA, though, which means, as one agent explains with extreme gravity, “The Reptoids have heard the new MGMT album.” Things get even weirder when the band hops on a bus to get to the bottom of these nefarious doings — but it looks like we’ll have to wait and see if there’s a part two to this story.

Not long ago, something funny started to happen inside the tawny, shaggy head of MGMT’s Andrew VanWyngarden. He was in upstate New York with bandmate Ben Goldwasser, recording their third album (MGMT, due out September 17th) in a rustic room surrounded by keyboards, drum machines and sequencers – working 12-hour days for weeks on end. “Weird things would happen to me up there,” says the singer, sitting in a trendy Italian restaurant in New York’s East Village. “I had total mental breakdowns sometimes.” His solution: “I was like, ‘I’m gonna go in the grocery store, and if there’s a flier up that says FREE KITTENS, I’m gonna get one.'” He shows me a photo of his new cat on his phone.

Since their earliest dorm-room jam sessions at Wesleyan University, VanWyngarden and Goldwasser have reveled in a quirky, subversive approach to rock stardom. They took weeks to decide whether to sign with Columbia Records when the label made an offer in 2006. “We kind of treated it like a joke, the way we were treating most things at that point,” says Goldwasser, who had been working construction. “We were a little scared,” VanWyngarden admits. When they did sign, it took them a while to get used to being part of the music industry. “So many musicians have this really commercial sensibility about everything,” says Goldwasser. “That made me really disgusted. Looking at music as a product, talking about what we were doing like a brand? We had never thought about music that way.”

Then came the lackluster public response to their weird, arty second LP, 2010’s Congratulations. “If you want to see the most uncomfortable people in the world,” says VanWyngarden, “watch our red-carpet interviews at the Grammys in 2010.” Some blamed drugs for the duo’s majorly psychedelic detour; while they have nothing against drugs per se (VanWyngarden has fond memories of tripping in a hotel room during a New England sleet storm), the criticism got under their skin. “It got out of control,” says VanWyngarden. Goldwasser says their European tour for Congratulations is the worst memory of his life with the band: “I was thinking, like, ‘What am I actually doing right now?'”

That the label still trusted them enough to leave them to their own devices for the follow-up came as a relief. MGMT is their most experimental LP yet – electronic music that’s definitely not meant for dancing. “I don’t even know if it’s music we would want to listen to,” VanWyngarden says proudly. “It’s just what’s coming out of us. We didn’t make a single compromise.”

For their follow-up to 2010’s experimental, divisive Congratulations, Ben Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden went even weirder – immersing themselves in synths, drum machines and Eighties house records. You can hear those influences in the electronic throb pulsing through avant-pop jams like “Your Life Is a Lie” and “Plenty of Girls in the Sea.” “We used to think of crazy, improvised experimentation as a fun thing we’d do on the side,” says VanWyngarden. “But this time around, we thought we might as well embrace it.”

Media: Rolling Stone’s Accused Boston Bomber Cover Was A Commercial Success, For Better Or Worse – Adweek Reports

As controversial as it was, Rolling Stone’s July issue featuring an attractive photo of accused Boston bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on the cover was a hit for the magazine. Adweek reports:

Rolling Stone posted a preview of the cover on BPVOMoYCUAIPdIVRollingstone.com on July 16 and posted the cover story “Jahar’s World” the following day. (The practice of posting cover articles online is relatively new for Rolling Stone, which has been upping its digital game lately.) Together, the stories brought a sizable traffic surge: During the week ending July 21, the website attracted 1.5 million unique U.S. visitors, according to comScore—a 41 percent increase over the previous week’s traffic. For all of July, Rollingstone.com traffic was up 20 percent year over year, with 3.6 million uniques.

Sales for that issue also jumped 102 percent over the average issue sold within the last year.

Rolling Stone Sales of Magazine Skyrocket In Spite Of Boston Bomber Cover

Boston officials  raised hell over the cover, which they said it glorify the 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev — one of the alleged masterminds behind the Boston Marathon bombings — on it’s August cover,  and drug stores like CVS, 7-Eleven, and Walgreens flatly refused to carry copies of the issue at all.  However, according to one person familiar with the circulation numbers,  sales of Rolling Stone August issue are up 20 percent and counting.

Rolling Stone has long been an outlet for both social and political commentary and reporting. There is nothing out of line nor inappropriate with the piece about the Boston tragedy nor the cover. The hue and cry over this issue of Rolling Stone seems to be based upon raw emotion, which is understandable, and not about reporting, in depth, the particulars of this sad chapter in America’s history. It is important to understand the truth of the events that led a promising youngster to become a radical Islamic extremist who cares little for his life or the lives of those affected by his thoughtless and actions. I fully support Rolling Stone in their efforts to make the whole truth known; before judging this issue by its cover the public should read Ms. Reitman’s article. As for those companies who are refusing to sell this issue, they are woefully narrow in mind and vision.

AA

Behind Rolling Stone’s Cover, a Story Worth Reading – New York Times

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By DAVID CARR
Published: July 19, 2013

Of all the outraged responses to the Rolling Stone cover of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the 19-year-old suspect in the Boston marathon bombings, those from Boston were particularly acute. Mayor Thomas Menino wrote a letter of protest to Rolling Stone and several retailers with Boston ties said they would not sell the controversial issue.

And then on Thursday, Boston Magazine responded to Rolling Stone’s editorial decision with one of its own, publishing photos of the manhunt and arrest of Mr. Tsarnaev. The images were taken by Sgt. Sean Murphy, a photographer with the Massachusetts State Police who was described as “furious” about the Rolling Stone cover and accused the magazine of “glamorizing the face of terror.”

His protest, which included graphic photos of Mr. Tsarnaev during his capture, ended up creating a controversy of its own. According to Boston Magazine, Sergeant Murphy was relieved of duty just hours after he turned over hundreds of photos to the magazine.

Mr. Murphy’s actions may have put him in hot water at work, but it is not hard to understand the emotions that drove his decision. News developments, and the way they are presented in the news media, always fall harder on some than others, especially victims, families of victims and first responders.

The ubiquitous footage of the fall of the World Trade Center towers is disturbing for anyone to watch, but for the many thousands of people related to people who died there viewing that footage produces a far different experience. Similarly, people who are related to victims who lost their lives or limbs as the result of the Boston Maraton bombings — Mr. Tsarnaev has pleaded not guilty to federal charges in connection with bombings — were appalled by the magazine’s decision. But the misery of some should not determine the value to the whole. There are things we need to know, including the fact that Mr. Tsarnaev, almost banal in his teenage aspects, is suspected of having become a cold-blooded killer.

The power of visual context was vividly illustrated on Wednesday when vast swaths of the Internet — and several prominent retailers — vehemently protested the Rolling Stone cover.

Actually, it wasn’t the who, but the how and where. With his thick, tousled hair falling into his eyes above direct brown eyes and a young man’s goatee, the reported bomber looked like many other American teenagers. Except there he was on the cover of the Rolling Stone, a storied piece of American cultural real estate about which songs have been written.

Absent that context, the image was unremarkable. It was a self-shot photo, or “selfie,’’ and there is no more ubiquitous photographic image in the current media age. Young people use their phones to take pictures of a lot of things but they love taking pictures of themselves. They strive to look as good, and as hot, as they can. Those who found the styling offensive can blame Mr. Tsarnaev. That photo is the way he wanted the world to see him. It was a compelling enough image that The New York Times decided to use it on its front page, where it came and went without a great deal of reaction.

In other words, it was not the image of Mr. Tsarnaev that ignited outrage, it was the frame. With its headline callouts to Jay Z and Willie Nelson on the current issue, and a history of hosting rock luminaries, there were suggestions that the magazine was conferring iconic status on a man who has been charged with a brutal act of terrorism. People suggested that Rolling Stone used the image to sell magazines, which, of course, they did. Editorially, the cover was a win. (The Boston media writer Dan Kennedy called it “brilliant.”)

When is the last time someone said to you, “Did you see the cover of Rolling Stone?” In a cluttered informational marketplace, magazines are in a dogfight for attention, not just with one another, but with every other form of media.

Part of the mass umbrage would seem to stem from a misunderstanding of the magazine and its cover. From the very beginning, Rolling Stone has seen long-form journalism as part of its mission, and more recently has proven its journalistic chops with important stories about Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal and the so-called vampire squids of Goldman Sachs. Those were good, important stories and while the profile about Mr. Tsarnaev did not break a lot of new ground, it did an excellent job of explaining how someone who looked like the kid next door radicalized in place and, according to the federal charges, decided to attack innocents to make a political point. There is civic and journalistic value in finding out more about who this person is, and if the cover created in-bound interest, that would seem to be to the good.

Still, many piled on, accusing Rolling Stone of a cynical play for attention while they sought some of the same in their reaction. The actor James Woods, among others, found himself on the moral high ground, issuing a profane and personal rebuke to Jann Wenner, the owner and publisher of Rolling Stone.

The story and cover treatment of Mr. Tsarnaev was clinically an act of journalism. Commercial and editorial motives were at work, as they are when almost anyone publishes anything. People who read beyond the cover discovered that the pretty boy on the front appeared to have deep, nascent ugliness in his heart. Just as you can’t judge a book (or a magazine) by its cover, the kid behind that confident selfie was, it seems, a big, hot mess.