Anton Corbijn To Open “Waits/Corbijn ’77 – ’11” Exhibition On May 5th In Amsterdam

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On May 5th, WAITS/CORBIJN ’77 –’11, a limited edition book by Anton Corbijn and Tom Waits will be presented for the first time at &Foam the project space of Foam, the Photography Museum Amsterdam. To celebrate the book release, there will be an exhibition of unique material on display, allowing an insight into the book’s creative process and how this collaboration came to fruition. Anton Corbijn will be present at the event on May 5th to sign copies, ahead of the book’s worldwide release on the 8th of May. The presentation is organized by Foam, which since opening its doors in 2001, has established itself as one of Europe’s primary venues for photography. Foam has hosted solo exhibitions by key names in international photography, such as Henri Cartier-Bresson, Richard Avedon, Diane Arbus, Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin, Annie Leibovitz and Anton Corbijn, whose major exhibition of recent work “Inwards and Onwards” was Foam’s highest attended show to date.

LOOK INSIDE THE BOOK

slipcase

WAITS/CORBIJN ‘77-‘11
Photographs by Anton Corbijn
Curiosities by Tom Waits
Collector’s Edition of 6,600 copies
with slipcase

List price:
€ 148.- plus local VAT
(D) € 158.36 / (A) € 162.80 /
(CH) CHF 204.00
(US) US$ 200.00 / (GB) GBP 135.00

10 x 14⅙ in. / 25.5 x 36 cm
272 pages, 226 color and duotone plates

ISBN 978-3-8296-0555-7

THE BOOK

WAITS/CORBIJN ‘77-‘11 is the celebration of an artistic collaboration that reaches back more than 35 years, to those first black-and-white photographs of Tom Waits taken by a young and virtually unknown Anton Corbijn in Holland in 1977. Corbijn would go on to acclaim for his iconic, enigmatic portraits of musicians and other artists – from U2 and Miles Davis to Robert De Niro and Clint Eastwood to Damien Hirst and Gerhard Richter – also becoming a pioneer in music video and more recently, an award-winning director of feature films.

By 1977, Tom Waits was already known worldwide for a series of stunning, timeless albums, filled with songs of a noir-tinged Los Angeles that owed as much to writers like John Fante and Jack Kerouac as it did to the jazz, blues, and tin-pan alley that had soaked into Waits’ pores from childhood. Ahead of Waits lay his partnership with Kathleen Brennan – leading to such touchstone recordings as Rain Dogs and Mule Variations – his film work with the likes of Francis Ford Coppola and Jim Jarmusch, and his stage projects with legendary director Robert Wilson.

In those first photographs, then, are the seeds of these two intertwined careers, feeding off each other. Waits’ vibrant persona helped Corbijn define his narrative, cinematic style of still photography: images that felt as if you were coming in on the middle of some unfolding drama. In turn, Corbijn helped Waits evolve his visual style into a new theatrical self that synced beautifully with the experimental music he was making with Brennan. And lead him to his own photography, collected here for the first time under the title “Curiosities,” a visual handle to the artistic intelligence millions of fans know only through his music. Photographs of Tom Waits by Anton Corbijn, photographs by Tom Waits of the vivid quotidian, stretching down through the years, and presented for the first time in a beautiful clothbound book; side by side, these 226 images record one of the longest and most fruitful collaborations in the careers of both artists.

One of the best anti-war song/video: Hell Broke Luce by Tom Waits

Sources: Tom Waits-Anton Corbijn, Tom Waits news, YouTube, Wiki

Tom Waits and Anton Corbijn to Release a Collaborative Photographic Book “Waits/Corbijn ’77-’11”

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WAITS/CORBIJN ‘77-‘11, a collector’s edition linen slipcase book limited to 6,600 copies, is scheduled for a May 8th release in US and Europe by renowned German publisher Schirmer-Mosel. The coffee table art book not only features over 200 pages of Waits’ portraits taken by Corbijn over four decades, but also includes over 50 pages of the first published collection of musings and photographs taken by Waits himself. The linen bound book has introductions written by film director Jim Jarmusch, and the longtime music critic Robert Christgau.

WAITS/CORBIJN ‘77-’11 is the chronicle of an artistic collaboration that reaches back more than 35 years, to those first black-and-white photographs of Tom Waits taken by a young Anton Corbijn in Holland in 1977. Corbijn would go on to acclaim for his iconic enigmatic portraits of musicians and other artists—from U2 and Miles Davis to Robert De Niro and Clint Eastwood to Damien Hirst and Gerhard Richter—also becoming a designer, a pioneer in music video and more recently, an award-winning director of feature films. By 1977, Tom Waits was already known world-wide for a series of stunning, timeless albums, filled with songs of a noir-tinged Los Angeles that owed as much to writers like John Fante and Jack Kerouac as it did to jazz, blues and tin-pan alley that had soaked into Waits’ pores from childhood. Ahead of Waits lay his partnership with Kathleen Brennan—leading to such touchstone recordings as Rain Dogs and Mule Variations—his film work with the likes of Francis Ford Coppola and Jim Jarmusch, and his stage projects with legendary director Robert Wilson.

In those first photographs, then, are the seeds of these two intertwined careers, feeding off each other. Waits’ vibrant persona helped Corbijn define his narrative, cinematic style of still photography: images that felt as if you were coming in on the middle of some unfolding drama. Corbijn complimented Waits’ theatrical side in a way that synced beautifully with the experimental music he was making with Brennan. “Anton picks up a small black box, points it at you and all the leaves fall from the trees. The shadows now are long and scary, the house looks completely abandoned and I look like a handsome… undertaker. I love working with Anton, he’s someone with a real point of view. Believe me, I won’t go jumping off rocks wearing only a Dracula cape for just anyone,” Waits says.
Waits’ own photography, collected here for the first time under the title “Curiosities,” gives a visual handle to the artistic intelligence millions of fans know only through his music.

Photographs of Tom Waits by Anton Corbijn, photographs by Tom Waits of the vivid quotidian, stretching down through the years and presented for the first time in a beautiful clothbound book; side by side, these 226 images record one of the longest and most fruitful collaborations in the careers of both artists. “It’s rare”, Corbijn says, “to take photographs of someone over a 30+ year period. Our work together developed totally organically and that’s a beauty in itself. We are very serious about our work but when it comes to working together, we’re like children resisting maturity. It’s liberating and a much needed legal drug.”

Waits/Corbijn ’77-‘11
Photographs by Anton Corbijn
Curiosities by Tom Waits
Texts by Jim Jarmusch and Robert Christgau
Limited edition of 6.600 w/slipcase
272 pages, 226 color and duotone plates
ISBN 978-3-8296-0555-7

Sources: Tom Waits-Anton Corbijn, Tom Waits news, Wiki

Dream Brother: The Lives & Music of Jeff And Tim Buckley

The Buckleys’ motives were the antithesis of a record business built on verifiable goals. Their music was a journey without a destination. No wonder its allure endures.

Two singers who died young and relatively unknown — Jeff Buckley and his estranged father, Tim Buckley — are the subjects of a new book and are cited by countless performers as inspirations. Tim Buckley’s career is chronicled comprehensively for the first time on a new two-CD anthology, while the keepers of Jeff Buckley’s estate have more than doubled his recorded output since his 1997 death.

Tim Buckley and his son Jeff Buckley

Tim Buckley and his son Jeff Buckley

The Buckleys have never been more popular, their artistry as singers and songwriters never more respected. What’s going on here? Is this another case of death as the ultimate career-enhancing move, another sorry example of tragedy creating its own cult of hero worship, as was the case with pop-culture icons from the Doors’ Jim Morrison to rapper Tupac Shakur?

Not quite. Unlike Shakur, Morrison, Jimi Hendrix, Elvis Presley and others who have been milked for nostalgia and revenue long after their premature deaths, the Buckleys were not established stars when they died. They were intensely introspective lyricists and gifted singers, blessed with multi-octave ranges that held more than a hint of feminine delicacy and otherworldly power. They also were boyishly handsome, broodingly intense human beings who performed as though they were channeling their innermost secrets, doubts and desires without shame or censorship. Both appeared enraptured when on stage, in the grip of something or someone outside themselves, empowered to attempt the impossible even if it meant looking foolish, or worse.

In his most famous song, “Song to the Siren,” Tim Buckley anguished over a desire so deep it could drive a man to his death: “Now my foolish boat is leaning/Broken lovelorn on your rocks.” The imagery in that line was echoed in an interview with his son more than two decades later. “I want to be ripped apart by music,” Jeff Buckley said in 1994.

“I want it to be something that feeds and replenishes, or that totally sucks the life out of you. I want to be dashed against the rocks.”

Tim and Jeff Buckley both crashed before they had an opportunity to fulfill their promise. Tim Buckley died in 1975 of a heroin overdose; he was 28 and had recorded nine albums, none of which had spent any significant time on the pop charts. He wasn’t even deemed worthy of a review in the leading rock publication of the era, Rolling Stone magazine, until his last album. Jeff Buckley was 30 in 1997 when he drowned in the Mississippi River near Memphis while preparing to record what would have been only his second album. His first album, “Grace,” released in 1994, was a modest cult favorite, selling 180,000 copies — about an average week’s work for ‘N Sync — and leaving him millions of dollars in debt to his Columbia Records label for recording, video, promotional and touring costs.

Yet more than a decade ago, three of Tim Buckley’s songs were covered on albums by the ultra-hip chamber-pop ensemble This Mortal Coil, introducing him to a new generation of listeners. Now it’s possible to trace a straight line from Tim’s searching brand of folk-soul through the work of Patti Smith, U2, Radiohead and the Verve’s former singer Richard Ashcroft, whose latest album (“Alone With Everybody”) is rife with Buckley-isms.

Since his death, Jeff Buckley has directly inspired songs or entire albums by a bevy of artists, among them Hole’s Courtney Love (“Boys on the Radio”), former Soundgarden singer Chris Cornell (“Wave Goodbye”), Juliana Hatfield (“Trying Not to Think About It”), Aimee Mann (“Just Like Anyone”) and Duncan Sheik (“A Body Goes Down”).

U2 closed many of its 1997 stadium concerts by dedicating songs to Buckley, and Jimmy Page and Robert Plant have sung his praises, recognizing in Buckley’s soft-to-loud blend of acoustic pastoralism and electric shriekback echoes of their own work in Led Zeppelin.

But it’s on a legion of younger performers that Jeff Buckley has had the most profound impact. Philadelphia boho-rock trio Maggi, Pierce and E.J. dedicates their fourth album, “For” (EMP Records), to “the life and music of Jeff Buckley,” and Canadian-Portuguese singer Nelly Furtado says it was “Grace” that inspired her free-flowing vocals on her acclaimed debut album, “Whoah, Nelly!” (Dreamworks).

Singer-songwriter James Gnecco and his band Ours, a recent signing by high-profile talent scout Michael Goldstone (Rage Against the Machine), is indebted to Jeff Buckley’s sound on its debut album, “Distorted Lullabies” (Dreamworks). And a batch of new British bands suggests more than passing interest in the late singer’s career; Coldplay’s “Shiver,” with its swooping vocals, sounds like a lost track from Buckley’s final sessions.

To those who never saw the Buckleys perform, the level of worship might seem out of whack with the music they left behind. “Morning Glory: The Tim Buckley Anthology” (Rhino), a new two-CD retrospective, tries to make sense of the singer’s career, but it’s a thankless task. Buckley never stayed in one place for long, the restlessness of his artistic muse leading him from quaint folk ditties that sound almost Elizabethan in their formality to howling, sadomasochistic R&B fantasies. In between these sometimes embarrassing extremes, Buckley found his most profound voice in a stripped-down acoustic-jazz setting akin to Van Morrison’s “Astral Weeks.” Like Morrison, Buckley discovered in the elasticity of these arrangements a perfect complement to the rollercoaster emotions contained in his voice, which deepens on a live version of “Phantasmagoria in Two” and breaks into joyous scatting and near-yodeling on live takes for “I’ve Been Out Walking” and “Troubadour.”

Concert performances brought out the best — and worst — in Jeff Buckley, though unlike his father (who worked with such accomplished musicians as the guitarist John Underwood and bassists John Miller and John Balkin) the younger singer never found a band versatile enough to do his vision justice. Jeff Buckley was never more persuasive than when accompanied only by his electric guitar at the Uncommon Ground coffee shop in Wrigleyville on a winter’s night in 1994. His voice breaking into androgynous squeals and erotic moans, Buckley brought a hymn-like beauty to songs associated with Edith Piaf and Leonard Cohen.

A few months later, Buckley was melting down on stage at the Green Mill, after a drinking binge precipitated by a quarrel with his record company. The incident is examined in David Browne’s meticulously researched dual biography, “Dream Brother: The Lives & Music of Jeff & Tim Buckley” (Harper Collins; $25), which ties together the lives of two men who barely knew each other but who suffered much the same fate at the hands of an uncomprehending record industry.

Jeff Buckley typically avoided talking about his estranged father (Tim Buckley was divorced from his Jeff’s mother, Mary Guibert, when Jeff was still an infant). But “Dream Brother” suggests that he began to empathize with Tim Buckley’s relentless record-company struggles as similar pressures came to bear in Jeff’s life. Tim Buckley was never in the good graces of record executives for very long, in part because he never settled on an immediately accessible direction for his career, preferring to see his art not in terms of a linear path but as an ever-changing kaleidoscope of colors and possibilities.

Jeff Buckley’s sole studio release, “Grace,” suggests that he shared at least some of that philosophy; its ecstatic eclecticism points his career in a half-dozen directions at once. But by mid-1997, Buckley had already aborted sessions for a follow-up album and was struggling to find a new direction; his band had just flown into Memphis to work on the singer’s demo tapes when he drowned. The unfinished music from that period has since been released as “Sketches for My Sweetheart the Drunk” (Columbia), and it’s a difficult listen for the uninitiated, like overhearing one of the voices in an intensely private phone conversation — powerful, self-indulgent and, with a few exceptions, lacking in the immediacy that distinguished “Grace.”

Judged purely on the studio recordings they left behind, Jeff and Tim Buckley were works in progress, artists still searching for their identity in a music-business not known for indulging the whims of mavericks. But their best music has a rapturousness lacking in much of today’s product-pushing industry, a sense of risk that flirts with melodrama while chasing transcendence, and a soul-baring beauty that makes even their most abject failures seem somehow noble. The Buckleys’ motives were the antithesis of a record business built on verifiable goals. Their music was a journey without a destination. No wonder its allure endures.

The Art of Singing – Discovering and Developing Your True Voice (Vocal Instruction) [Paperback]

Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.

Author: Jennifer Hamady

Description
The Art of Singing: Discovering and Developing Your True Voice is a new, groundbreaking book about the psychology of singing. Using the voice as a medium, author Jennifer Hamady explores how fear, poor learning habits, preconceived notions, and an unhealthy mindset can and do often get in the way of optimal musical and personal performance. With practical advice for releasing mental and physical tensions, establishing confidence and vocal strength, and embracing personal and musical optimism and wonder, Jennifer offers musicians and non-musicians alike a path toward truly joyful self-expression. The book includes a chapter dedicated to vocal technique, as well as a CD, narrated by Jennifer herself, with exercises, tips, and suggestions for optimal vocal development.

To order from Amazon click HERE

Gender in the Music Industry: Rock, Discourse and Girl Power

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Marion Leonard
Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2007 – 239 pages
Leonard addresses core issues relating to gender, rock and the music industry through a case study of ‘female-centred’ bands from the UK and US performing so called ‘indie rock’ from the 1990s to the present day. Using original interview material with both amateur and internationally renowned musicians, the book further addresses the fact that the voices of musicians have often been absent from music industry studies. Leonard’s central aim is to progress from feminist scholarship that has documented and explored the experience of female musicians, to presenting an analytic discussion of gender and the music industry. In this way, the book engages directly with a number of under-researched areas: the impact of gender on the everyday life of performing musicians; gendered attitudes in music journalism, promotion and production; the responses and strategies developed by female performers; the feminist network riot grrrl and the succession of international festivals it inspired under the name of Ladyfest.

Exclusive Book Excerpt: ‘Amy, My Daughter’ by Mitch Winehouse – By Rolling Stone

Late singer’s father recounts the origins of ‘Rehab

‘Amy, My Daughter’ by Mitch Winehouse. Harper Collins

By Rolling Stone
June 27, 2012

After the tragic death of Amy Winehouse last year, her father, Mitch, agreed to write a memoir about his daughter’s brief life. In this exclusive excerpt from Amy, My Daughter, he recounts when Amy switched representation from 19 Management to Metropolis Music, her first meeting with producer Mark Ronson and their early work on the tunes that would form her blockbuster album, Back to Black. “You know, they tried to make me go to rehab, and I told them no, no, no,” she told Ronson during a walk in New York, talking about her family. “That’s quite gimmicky,” he said. “We should turn that into a song.”

Leaving 19 was a tough decision but it turned out to be the right one. In the end, Amy’s relationship with Raye Cosbert and Metropolis became, in my view, one of the most successful artist/manager partnerings in the music business. Very quickly, Raye set up meetings with Lucian Grainge at Universal, and Guy Moot at EMI. Raye’s energy was just what Amy’s career needed – like a kick up the arse. For some time Guy Moot had wanted Amy to get together with the talented young Mark Ronson, a producer/arranger/songwriter/DJ. In March 2006, a few months after she’d signed with Metropolis, Raye encouraged her to meet Mark in New York so the two of them could ‘hook up’. She knew very little about him before she walked into his studio on Mercer Street in Greenwich Village, and on first seeing him, she said, ‘Oh, the engineer’s here.’ Later she told him that she’d thought he would be an older Jewish guy with a big beard. That meeting was a bit like an awkward first date. Amy played Mark some Shangri-Las tracks, which had the real retro sound that she was into, and she told him that was the sort of music she wanted to make for the new album. Mark knew some of the tracks Amy mentioned but otherwise she gave him a crash course in Sixties jukebox, girl-group pop music. She’d done the same for me when I’d stumbled over a pile of old vinyl records – the Ronettes, the Chiffons, the Crystals – that she’d bought from a stall in Camden Market. That had been where she’d developed her love of Sixties makeup and the beehive hairdo.

Photos: Amy Winehouse Remembered

They met again the following day, by which time Mark had come up with a piano riff that became the verse chords to “Back to Black.” Behind the piano, he put a kick drum, a tambourine and “tons of reverb.” Amy loved it, and it was the first song she recorded for the new album.

Amy was supposed to be flying home a few days later, but she was so taken with Mark that she called me to say she was going to stay in New York to carry on working with him. Her trip lasted another two weeks and proved very fruitful, with Amy and Mark fleshing out five or six songs. Amy would play Mark a song on her guitar, write the chords down for him and leave him to work out the arrangements. A lot of her songs were to do with Blake [Fielder-Civil], which did not escape Mark’s attention. She told Mark that writing songs about him was cathartic and that “Back to Black” summed up what had happened when their relationship had ended: Blake had gone back to his ex and Amy to black, or drinking and hard times. It was some of her most inspired writing because, for better or worse, she’d lived it.

Mark and Amy inspired each other musically, each bringing out fresh ideas in the other. One day they decided to take a quick stroll around the neighbourhood because Amy wanted to buy Alex Clare a present. On the way back Amy began telling Mark about being with Blake, then not being with Blake and being with Alex instead. She told him about the time at my house after she’d been in hospital when everyone had been going on at her about her drinking. “You know they tried to make me go to rehab, and I told them, no, no, no.”

“That’s quite gimmicky,” Mark replied. “It sounds hooky. You should go back to the studio and we should turn that into a song.”

Of course, Amy had written that line in one of her books ages ago. She’d told me before she was planning to write a song about what had happened that day, but that was the moment “Rehab” came to life.

Amy had also been working on a tune for the “hook,” but when she played it to Mark later that day it started out as a slow blues shuffle – it was like a twelve-bar blues progression. Mark suggested that she should think about doing a Sixties girl-group sound, as she liked them so much. He also thought it would be fun to put in the Beatles-style E minor and A minor chords, which would give it a jangly feel. Amy was unaccustomed to this style – most of the songs she was writing were based around jazz chords – but it worked and that day she wrote “Rehab” in just three hours.

If you had sat Amy down with a pen and paper every day, she wouldn’t have written a song. But every now and then, something or someone turned the light on in her head and she wrote something brilliant. During that time it happened over and over again.

The sessions in the studio became very intense and tiring, especially for Mark, who would sometimes work a double shift and then fall asleep. He would wake up with his head in Amy’s lap and she would be stroking his hair, as if he was a four-year-old. Mark was a few years older than Amy, but he told me he found her very motherly and kind.

This was a very productive period for Amy. She’d already written “Wake Up Alone,” “Love Is a Losing Game” and “You Know I’m No Good” when we were on holiday in Spain, so the new album was taking shape. Before she’d met Mark, Amy had been in Miami, working with Salaam Remi on a few tracks. Her unexpected burst of creativity in New York prompted her to call him. She told him how excited she was about what she was doing with Mark, and Salaam was very encouraging. Jokingly, she said to him, “So you’d better step up.” Later she went back to Miami to work some more with Salaam, who did a fantastic job on the tracks he produced for the album.

When Amy returned to London she told me excitedly about some of the Hispanic women she’d seen in Miami, and how she wanted to blend their look – thick eyebrows, heavy eye-liner, bright red lipstick – with her passion for the Sixties “beehive.”

By then, Mark had all he needed to cut the music tracks with the band, the Dap-Kings, at the Daptone Recording Studios in Brooklyn. Shortly after that my mother passed away and Amy, along with the rest of the family, was in pieces. It wasn’t until a few weeks later, in June 2006, that Amy added the last touches to Back to Black, recording the vocals at the Power House Studios in west London. I went along that day to see her at work – the first time I’d been with her while she was recording. I hadn’t heard anything that she’d been doing for the new album, so it was amazing to listen to it for the first time. The sound was so clear and so basic: they’d stripped everything back to produce something so like the records of the early sixties. Amy did the vocals for Back to Black over the already-recorded band tracks, and I stood in the booth with Raye, Salaam and one or two others while she sang.

It was fascinating to watch her: she was very much in control, and she was a perfectionist, redoing phrases and even words to the nth degree. When she wanted to listen to what she’d sung, she’d get them to put it on a CD, then play it in my taxi outside, because she wanted to know how most people would hear her music, which would not be through professional studio systems. In the end, Back to Black was made in just five months.

Excerpted from the book Amy, My Daughter by Mitch Winehouse, out June 26th, with permission from It Books.

Read more: Rolling Stone Magazine

Hello Sunshine [Hardcover] – Ryan Adams (Author)

Editorial Reviews
From Publishers Weekly
Ryan Adams is among his generation’s most gifted and important singer/songwriters. Just into his 30s, Adams has already released a dozen albums jammed with soul-stirring songs and frighteningly precise lyrics about love, loss, and youthful wildness. Unfortunately, these distinctions and qualities do not translate to his poetry, which seems to be more a kind of performative journaling than an attempt at high art. But perhaps that’s a kind of poetry too. If so, it’s poetry in the manner of late Charles Bukowski—alternately ecstatic, drunken, droll, bewildered, jokey—and will appeal to a similar audience: teenagers looking for a guide through the confusing maze of adolescence. Adams’s many rabid fans will find much to enjoy in this second collection, following right on the heels of his poetry debut, Infinity Blues (2009). Adams takes his readers through his crazy days, high on adrenaline (bicyclemad/ born dizzy/ i am/ flying off the cliff of panic hill), praising the beloved (i love her/ my bug/ she knows…) and finding the symbolism in the everyday: the sky…/…just got back from the grocery store, smiling/ new particles to add to the table of contents/ in some lunar book/ written in wishes. (Dec.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author
Ryan Adams is an alt-country/rock singer-songwriter best known for his song “New York, New York.” In addition to releasing 5 solo albums, Adams has also produced an album by Willie Nelson and contributed to albums by Toots and the Maytals, Beth Orton, The Wallflowers, Minnie Driver, Counting Crows, and Cowboy Junkies. Also appeared on CMT’s Crossroads with Elton John.

AMAZON book details